100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FHE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUfr £idii auptDali
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OI THE UNIVERSTTv
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the r
y year by the Board in Control of Student Publieahtrns
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
[he Associated Press is exclusively entitled ti tht
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it, > n
edited in this paper and the local news published therer
Entcred at the postoitice at Arw bot b " Mrhehi
ss matter.
Subscription >y carrier oi mail. $3.50 -
Offices: Ann \rbor Press butildiner, l.'...
Phones BusinessQ oo ditorial t414
loriuunicatuzs tnut to exceed jvc w',, ds, it eigiid, tht t;
tune not iecessarily to appear in print, but a .au evidence
th. and notices of events will be ipublished is 1'h4 lDaily at i,-
cretion of the Editor. if 'eft at of maild to tht llai~ y ic,
signed commtinicationt will receive no cnnsideraion N
ript will be returned artless the writer itteltoses ;otagt
T'he fDaily does not necessarily endlors,- the. aenf:ti,.,
'sstd i Yth eomirunications,
"WVhat's Going On" notices will not he received ater
the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
LNAGING EDITOR..........GEORGE O. bROPHY JR
ms Editor .........Chesser M Campbell
ght Editors- -
T.H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B .CabelJ. E. McManis
J.L.Dakbne T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Ren~ad Sherwood
day Editor....... ... .. ....A.. . A. Bernstein
torials................ Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern. T. J. Whinery
ustant'News ............. ..................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
rts ..........................................Robert Angell
men's Editor...............................Mary D. Lane
scope ......... .............................JackW .elly

in his picture, and he must rise or fall by the all-
around product of his genius. The competition thus
engendered is a good thing for photoplay progress;
it is the reason for most of the rea reel art pro-
duced in the, past, and the promise of more in the
future.

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES

AND DESK CALENDARS
AT

hine Walde
G. Weber
beth Vickery
C"-Ift.

Assistants
Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace F. Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer
Hughston McBain
Frank M. McPike
J.A. Bacdn ,..
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
. W. Hume, Jr.
Pyron Darnton

M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Bleata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton.
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr
Sara Wailer
H. E. Howlett

othy Monfort
ry B. Grundy
ices Oberholtzer
-ert . Adams
ge L. Stone

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960

ISINESS MANAGER .........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
vertising .........< .....................D. P. Joyce
sifieds......................................Robt. 0. Kerr
blication ............. ..................F. M. Heath
;counts................................. ..E]. R. Priehs
culation ................ ......................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
gmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
ster W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

A CONVOCATION HOUR
University convocations have received the hearty
endorsement of the campus at large. It is appre-
ciated on every hand that Michigan, as a whole,
must meet together more often to preserve'its unity
as its departments become more specialized and its
attendance increases. The University is now the
third largest educational institution in America. The
days are long since past when the president taught
several subjects in addition to performing his ex-
ecutive duties. There has, of necessity, been a ten-
dency for student and student, and students and
faculty to drift apart. It is not a vain hope that
convocations will go a long way toward counteract-
ing this undesired companion of growth and bring-
ng all Michigan- closer together again. -
In the wake of the convocation plan as first pro-
posed, have come important movements for the in-
auguration of meetings of parts of the student
body, such as the upperclassmen, who have been
very successfully called together. These meetings-
have much to commend them. Formation of poli-
cies in gatherings that tax the capacity of Hill aud-
itorium - for such will be the regular convoca-
tions - will be difficult at least and will be greatly
facilitated if matters are thrashedout a little be-
forehand.
But it should be remembered that the arrange-
ment of group meetings is not ~the main objective.
These gatherings should be only supplementary. To
stop with them would be to stop before the great-
est possibilities of the convocastion plan have been
realized.
It should be possible to weld the group meetings
and the regular convocations into one big system
that will result in the greatest good. This has much
to be said for it in view of thq practical problem of
setting meeting times, alone. One hour could be
set aside each week when all student and faculty
activities would cease. This time would be avail-
able, first, for a convocation if conditions demanded
it, or if such a gathering were in the opinion oft
President Marion L. Burton 'unnecessary, the hour
would be open for class, inter-class, and inter-de-
partment meetings and the like.
What hour is set aside is immaterial as long as
some hour is made available. In many respects
Wednesday is a convenient day aijd the sugges-
tion that there be no academic work scheduled for
Wednesday at two o'clock is not a bad one. The
essential point is that some action be taken to pro-
vide a convocation hour for next semester.
"Caught wife in bear trap, Southern 'wild man'
says," runs a headline in Sunday's Chicago Trib-
une. Oh, Burroughs, spare the rest of us from
thy gospel.
Judging from the recent example of police mark-
manship, it might be safer if the officers would
aim at the students when trying to scare them.
The International Conductors' association has
adopted a new song entitled, "Carfare Must Not
Ring Tonight !"

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Bletweeni
Detroit, AnnX rbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and , Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. tn. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
1,ocals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m
and every two hours to 9:00 p. in.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti only.
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m.. and 1:15 a.m
Locals to Jackson-7 :54 a. in., and
12:10 p.m.

S DaiLry Lunch:
Our food is the best
Our prices are right
HOURS
7 A.M. TO1P.M. e
5 P. M. TO 7 P.M.
SUNDAYS
-8 A. M.TO 7:30 P.m.
512EAST WILLIAM STREET
ftE 11 B11lli [Ili1 1l II 111111111111 n7

GKA1AN 'S

Both

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

{

JAtNUARY
M~ T' W T

s

2
9
16
23
34

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
25

;

12
19
20

Ii
13
20
27

F S
1
7 8
11 15
21 22
28 29

F

VENUS
S thest"ent orprof.,
rivals all for perfect pencil
work. 17 black degrees and
3 copying.
American Lead
PencilCo.
A0FfhAe. ear
Vlarest sell~hzt -
s qait penci
i the world

-

.

, _

I

I

91
C8
'a

,.,

1:,

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
ue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
all news to be printed that night,
4TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1921.
Night Editor-HUGH W. HITCHCOCK

NOW FOR THE BOWL
Announcement that the plan of building a "U"
t Ferry field has been abandoned brought little
urprise to the many persons on the campus who
ad heard of the discovery that a "bowl" similar
> the Yale stadium and almost unlimited in capac-
:y possibilities could be sunk in the high ground
authof the field for the same or less expense than
he "U". The Board in Control of Athletics is to
e commended for its quick revision of plans and
s decision to build temporary and movable stands
n the old field to take care of the needs of the
ext year or so as well as possible.
The fact that these temporary stands will not by
ny means provide for the great demand for seats,
hich last year was estimated at 50,000 for a sin-
le game, must not be forgotten. Every great game
ayed with the.inadequate stands will mean a loss,
f possible income. The movement for the com-
etion of the "U", which was swifly gathering
omentum before the bowl idea was broached,
ust not be allowed to die ; the momentum should
e turned at once to bring to realization the more
-actical proposition of the bowl.
THE DIRECTOR'S AGE.
The old movie days when stars used to insist on
eir own names in foot-high carmine type on all
splay ads are passing. No longer do the con-
acts read "and none but Cynthia' Cylph's name
call appear." The actor is fortunate indeed if his
gnomen appears even in the smaller subdecks; fo
e era when the star was the picture is becoming
ily a memory, and the director, once a mere me-
anic with a megaphone, has come into his own.
"MARSHALL NEILAN presents 'Dinty';"
)AVID WARK GRIFFITH'S great dram of
e and death;" "A CECIL De MILLE Produc-
n ;" "An ALLAN DWAN picture;" "GEORGE
)ANE TUCKER'S MiracleMan "-- so the list
es on. Some of the greater stars have managed
bridge the gap by becoming their own directors
d even writing their scenarios: The great trium-
rate, Pickford, Fairbanks, and Chaplin, come in
is category.
The change is certainly significant; and most fol-
wers of the film art believe that it is a change for
od. The glamor of a star's good looks and mere
esence on the screen was often used to advantage
producers who foisted poor films on the public
justified trust in that, public's blind wopship of
pularity. As long as the sight of an actor's name
a billboard was sufficient to crowd the picture
uses, little hope for real cinema art was in sight.
t the revolt came, slowly and 'convincingly; and
w, to be ,a true success, a photoplay must pos-
s plot, good photography, and above all the di-
tion which binds a play- together into a coherent
I interesting whole. For all of these qualities the
ector is responsible; and the rise of men of Grif-
's type, who could transform a mediocre Henry
Llthall and Mae Marsh into those wonderful cre-
ins. the "little colonel of "The Birth of a Na-
n" and the modern-day heroine of "Intolerance",
he truest guarantee of future greatness which
movies possess.
the director stands apart. He does not appear

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refitished and re-
blocked with all new trinings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hit Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1 792.
EXCEPTIONS TAKEN
TO HOBBS' VIEWS
In no uncertain terms, Prof. Thomas
C. Trueblood, of the oratorical depart-
ment in the University, replied in an
interview yesterday afternoon to Prof
W. H. Hobbs criticism of the Orator-
ical association's choice of speakers
for the lecture course this season.
"There is only a word to say," said
Professor Trueblood, "the chairman of
the lecture committee consulted the
President and several heads of de-
partments in regard to the course be-
fore publishing the list of speakers.
However, all understand that it is just
Hobbs, the irresponsible, self-appoint-
ed campus censor.
"The accusations gainst Rabbi Wise
ande Vice-President Marshall all may
be answered by them, if- they choose
to take any notice, and Senator 1'ev-
eridge will have a chance to reply
when he returns next June. The ar-
ticle is a severe reflection on the gen-
tlemen who introduced the distin-
guished speakers. I would suggest
that Professor Hobbs consult an 'ad-
visory committee' of 'enlightened Am-
ericans' of the faculty, before rushing
into print."

Where they all go

N'LUNCH

..i1111111111111111111 11111 ise I hlin ligini li 111 isii ii v iii 1 iii Utnut 111111111
EXT RA! =
SUBSTANTIAL REDUCTIONS,
On All KODAKS and CA MERAS
to go into effect at once.
Take advantage of these prices
- and this weather.
~LYN DON & COMPA NY
719 NORTh UNIVERSIfY
_ m

1116 So. University Ave.

Can't somebody think up an argument why
Soph prom should be stopped?

the

Thde Telescope
A girl insane imagines she's a princess
And it makes a truly mournful scene;
But here we have an even sadder sight -
I,500 co-eds, each believing she's a queen.
Our idea of adding insult to injury is to have
to stick around about half an hour every time you
go into one of these local banks, and then get a
statement at the end of the month charging you
$-5 ofor the "SERVICE" they rendered you in
keeping your money.
How to Be the Life of the Party
LESSON NO. IV
The following- lesson is intended primarily for
law students, and to obtain the best results should
be first tried out in a sorority house. Thus seated
on the divan with several of the sisters clustered
about you ask:
"Girls,how would you decide the following case
if you were a judge? A, B and C live on a side
bill. A has a peacock. A's peacock flies over into
B's back yard and lays an egg which at once rolls
over into C's front yard. Who owns the egg?"
When the argument has waxed strong among the
sisters as to what party should rightly own the eggs
you suddenly hold up a restraining hand and say:
"You're all wrong, girls. 1either A, nor B, nor
C owns the egg."
When somebody finally manages to get their
breath long enough to ask "Why?" you reply non-
chalantly
"Why, because peacocks don't,-lay eggs," and
you've forever enshrined yourself in their girlish
hearts as the house cutup.
Famous Closing Lines
"A parting of the weighs," he cried as the scales
broke under the weight of the stout lady.
NOAH COUNT.

1-

Fresh Lot White Shirts
I 52.25
GEORGE KYER'S

The

P'

i

i

SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
ETERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOB
LIGHT LUNCHES

i

Quarry Prescription Store
Corner So. State and No. University

ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL
OUR POLICY
Many Sales
Small Profits
Special This Week
White Shirts $2.25

SELLS

I

Creams for Chaps
Vanishing and Cold

GEORGE KYER
721 N. University

H- ;

re tll1il i i lntti ttt[ lltl ttti tttlll lttlttltttttlttt11111ltl l ittt l InI nInIIt~tlt
SPECIAL PRICES ON EVERY
r#
Dari ,~ a-mall
224-226 S. State
rnn g itlgiH i~~iiidiintrn1 a gt

THINC

7 Nickels Arcade

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan