100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 23, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FHE MICHIGAN DAILY

P f t r t O FICIA L NEW SPAPER OF rTH E N j t-
OF MICHI,AN
I 'Uli sheo ver mtIrrmnxn except M nd
V a, by the Roard in Control of Stii* ;e r
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATE1 't,
.. s Ciatcd I frret,- r clz .r 1'dv
ited in thi paper und the 'cat Inw'a ml .1 I
E.ntcred a the postothCe a nr \rbt \bl t clza i- -
matter.
Subscription by carrier o, mail, $x3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard ;<-.
Phones: Business. g6o: 1ditorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 3o words, if signed, the sig
re not Necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
. and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
etion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office
gned communications will receive no consideration. No man ,
pt will be returned unless the writer incluses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse, the sentiments v:
ed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received afttr 8 o'cioek
he evening preceding insertion.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR ..........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR,
Editor .............................Chesser M. Campbell
tEditors-
T. H. Adams I. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
y Editor......... ................J. A. Bernstein
ials.. ... ....Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
ant News.. ............................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
S.........................................Robert Angell
en's Editor.....................Mary D. Lane
raph ................................ --.West Gqlogly
ope ................................. ....Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
hine Waldo Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klaver
G. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
eth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
Cark Hughston McBain Beata iasley
,e Reindel Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
hy Monfort J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
B: Grundy W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
s Oberholtzer Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
t E. Adams J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
eL. Stone Byron Darnton H. Z. Howlett

Iti
re

-11

.,

- ,

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
SINESS MANAGER.... .....LEGRAND r,. GAINES JR.
'ertising........................................ D. P. Joyce
sifeds.......................................Robt. O. Kerr
)ication . ........... ,...............F. M. Heath
:unts....................................1 .R Priehs
lation ..................................V.F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Rober'tson
G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
.und Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
ter WV. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
e of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full chargt
11 news to be printed that night.

be to round out our lives and make them as nearly
as possible, balanced and complete. The "grind"
spends so muchtime studying the serious thoughts
of others that he loses touch completely with the
delightfully human lighter side of life. The man
who goes in unreservedly for this and that and the
other "activity" has no time and little thought to
waste on the really serious problems, excepting as
he is forced into direct, personal contact with them.
The one is apt to become didactic and dry, the
other enthusiastic but superficial.
We, should try to avoid the extremes in this as
in other things. We shall come closer to the at-
tainment of the ideal if we spend a fair amount of
time at studying, in campus and social activities, and
in thinking of the problems which must be solved
if our own and others' lives are to be as full of pro-
ductive results as they should be. This broader
view is our awakening.
PRACTICAL IDEALISM
Ideals are the privilege of youth. From cradle
to early manhood they crowd out the material
things of life, and often Youth steps out into the
world with airy strides after a goal of intangible
abstraction, utterly blind to the existence of oppos-
ing realistic forces. But sooner or later the pure
idealist, like Shakepeare's Hamlet, finds himself
confronted with facts that he cannot evade, and
disillusion which totters his ornate throne of
dreams. Then it is that the unreasoning idealist
must learn to reason, or like the tragic Prince of
Denmark, be blown aside as chaff in the gale of
.life.
On the other hand. an equally unfortunate hand-
icap hampers that Youth which through circum-
stance or environment has lost' all its ideals and
illusions. For without some aesthetic or spiritual
tendencies life can mean only existence, which in
turn signifies the satisfying of physical desires, and
leads to vice or often crime. Germany's pre-war
development of material efficiency to the exclusion
of all else, culminating in the very commercializa-
tion of "Gott",bears witness to the depths to which
Zolaistic realism can delude.
There is only one alternative, then, from which
to choose. We must believe in our ideals; that is
important; but we must take them, to use an old-
saying, with a pinch of salt. We must realize that
there are facts, but not make them our God. We
must balance the abstract with the material. The
man who is able to take the aspirations of his aes-
thetic or spiritual nature and apply them to the real
things in life, the practical idealist, is the one who
will relese the bonds upon the craft of success.
This column did its best to stage a hockey game
at 45 degrees in the shade, but the ice wouldn't
bear it up in the undertaking.
Coach Zuppke of Illinois is trying landscape'
painting in his spare time. Coach Yost, we under-
stand, is trying cases.
Zion City must smash all jazz records, demands
its head. Paint 'er red Zion !
the Telescope
Help! Help! Help the Telescope!
Why defeak the Blue Laws?
They're a boon to college men.
A Sunday date without expense
Would be possible under them.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In-Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Detoit ~Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and eery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. in.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson--7:54 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

ST UD Y LAMPS
and all kinds of
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES

go to'

I

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

JANUARY
SM TW T

F S
I

I PHONE 273

200 WASHINGTON ST.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 1921.
Night Editor-J. E. McMANIS.

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
GRAHAM'S

Both

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

. ._._..

For

2 3 4 5 d, 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 95 28 27 28 29
30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look Just like new, wear just as
long and saves you Ave to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main ยข& Huron
707 North University Ave.
TUTT LE'S
LUNCH ROOM-
A Nice Cozy Place Where-
You Enjoy Your Nleal
One half block South
of "MAJ"

GOLF AN'D POLO

WHITE OXFORD

SHIRTS

Fs,

TYSON

tI

ti

GIFTS THAT MULTIPLY
We in America who have suffered comparatively
ittle as a result of the recent European war can
hardly appreciate the conditions that prevail in for-
eign countries and the need of all classes; we
American students with our electrically lighted,
team heated rooms and our regular three meals a
day, can hardly realize that in some European
:ountries University men and women are without
lecent shelter, are wearing tattered clothes and uni-
:orms, relics of pre-war days, and are not only un-
tble to obtain medical attention but are often forced
:o go without food.
Much less can we appreciate the ravages of hun-
,er and sickness which prevail among the peoples
f Asia and particularly among the Chinese. When
ye try to conceive of 45 ooo,ooo people starving
ind an area of 125,000 square miles being almost
levastated by thy. scourge of hunger and death, our
magination ceases to function and we are apt to
hrust such suffering from our minds as being too
:ar away from our consideration.
Such conditions do prevail, however, and if we
n this well-fed country are to be honest with the
-est of the world we must face the problem which
he serious conditions abroad have made. One way
we can do it is. through the nation-wide campaign
vhich has just been launched, under' the guiding
land of Herbert Hoover, for the purpose of rais-
ng funds to send to the relief of foreign students
ind of the millions of starving people in China. The
>rganization for this campaign in the University
ias been completed and solicitations will begin in
arnest Tuesday, combined with the European ap-
>eal.
It may involve a little sacrifice for any one of us
o give three or four or five dollars of his allowance
o such a fund. But consider what such an amount
vill mean to persons in the condition of many whom
he money will go to save. With American funds
here worth many times their original value to us,
.nd with the cost of living lower in most cases
han we find it here, we can see what our gifts will
lo toward the relief of suffering. Our contributions
nultiply in transit.
We frequently go out for an evening, spend
rom two to four dollars, and think not a great
Leal of it. Can we not afford to sacrifice an even-
ng's entertainment for the aid of other human be-
ngs? The University of Illinois has raised more
han twice our quota. How well will Michigan
espond to the test?
HOW FAR ARE WE ASLEEP?
The charge that Michigan students are asleep has
een made so many times of late that sheer force
f repetition will convince us the statement is true
f we do not stop to analyze it. But is it unquali-
.edly true? Most of us are members of one of
wo groups: either we spend most of our time with
ur books and none in campus activities, or we pay
ttle attention to our books and devote ourselves
xclusively to the pursuit of purely temporary ends
avina to do with some phase of University life.
Each class exhibits the same shortcoming, a lack
f mental perspective. The aim of education should

$2.95

1921 Spring

Price

TINKER

& COMPANY

S. State St. at William St.
All of our stock has been reduced
to meet the new scale of prices

c -1 9 -Fj

(I-S -t

ItII i 111111 i 11111 1111lHMi 111.1 1 11 HIM Il li InII I II III III III 111W l 1111 1111 III I I i l11IlI I.
SPECIAL PRICES ON EVRYTHIN G
_ w
224-226 S. State 7 Nickels Arcade
: Ilillllllthhh11 111U llilh hlh iiitll I 111111 11 11 111111 11111111 l l Illf l Ill lIllIllillIlllllIll Ill Ill ifil

We buy now a box of sweets,
"Three-fifty," chimes the clerk;
A movie show and a fruit parfait
Completes the dirty work.
And when we'show her home again,
Pa is .ust behind the door,
So we get a smile and handshake,
Just that - and nothing more.
But in future times, oh boy ! Oh joy!
No movies Sunday night !
No more will seventy-seven be paid
For a dish of "Lover's Delight."

We're at her home, a guest of pa,
And we know he hates expense,
So out go all the 'lectrics
That's the Blue Laws' recompense.
John Dough.
It Takes Nerve to Pull This One
"There is a fine opening for a good dentist at
Berrien Springs," states an ad in my favorite
Daily. Would this properly be termed a cavity?
Perry Goric.
The Near- Humorist
The bird who, when you ask him if he ever used
William's shaving cream, replies, "No, he don't
stay at our house."
This Ought to Make the Girls See Red
May-Pass me that rouge, Belle, I'm going to
the fancy dress party.
Belle-Whad'ya going as, "A Study in Scarlet?"
May-No, "Under False Colors."
Famous Closing Lines
"A delver after knowledge," sighed the lad as
the dentist began probing at his wisdom tooth.
NOAH COUNT.

Are You a Judge of Va
JOHNSTON & MURPHY SHOES
Viscolized Brogue ..............
Cordovan Brogue. ...... ......
Cordovan Brogue Oxford......... .
Cordovan Plain Oxford. . ..........
WAGNER QUALITY
WAGNER & COMPANY
State Street at Liberty
Established 1848

lues?,

$18.90
$16.90
$14.75
$ 9.75

.1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan