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January 22, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-22

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~

THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COLDER
TODAY

r4 Li ikau

I aiti

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERTICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 81. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

WOLVERINES BEAT
IOWA FOR FIRST
CONFERENCE WIN

BRILLIANT
LEADS

WORK OF
TEAM INTO]
GAME

KARPUS
FAST

VARSITY STARTS WITH
RUSH AND HOLDS LEAD
Ball Goes Down Floor Faster Than in
- Any Game This Season;
Kaufman Stars
Michigan went into the Conference
win column Friday night by defeating
Iowa 19 to 15 in a fast and rough
game. Michigan was in the lead all
of the time, except at the end of the
half, when the score was tied at 7
all.
Captain Karpus had the basket eye
with him and threw in three counters
from the field, and as many more
fr9m the foul line. He was high
scorer with a total of 9 points, with
Shimek of the visitors close behind
with 7. It is difficult to pick a win-
ner from the Michigan team, as all of
the . men played winning basketball.
Miller's two baskets in the last half,
and the like number that Dunne drop-
ped through the ring, all came at
times when the points were needed.
Ball Goes Fast
Le Galley, playing his first Confer-
ence game, proved a strong guard, and
one that followed the opposing play-
ers every minute of the contest. De-
spite a lack of polished team play on
the part of both quintets, the men
played well together, and the speed
with which the ball was worked down
the floor was greater than that of any
other game here this season. Many
fouls were called on the members of
both teams. Iowa, the team that
went through the Minnesota game
making only one foul was guilty of
seven slips, three of which Captain
Karpus converted into points.
Michigan Starts with Rush
Captain Kaufmann, of the Hawk-
eyes, played a steady game on de-
fense, and proved himself especially
adept at breaking up the Michigan of-
fensive. Aubrey Devine, football star,
played one of the fastest games of the
evening, and added 2 points from the
floor to his team's total.
Michigan started with a rush, and
two sensational baskets by Captain'
Karpus carried the Varsity into the
lead, which they never relinquished
for any length of time.
Iowa turned the table at the start
of the second period, 4and secured a
three point advantage, but Karpus
again proved his ability and tied the
score alone. Dunne and Williams
then counted for Michigan, and Miller
sewed up the game with four points,
his latter basket being the prettiest
of the game, a long one handed shot
from the side of the court.
Varsity Shooting Improves
Michigan's -close guarding, and the
improved basket shooting of the play-
ers, makes the Varsity look dangerous
(Continued on Page Six)
SENIOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
INTERVIEWED BY WICKENDEN
Western Electric Personnel Manager
Describes Work Offered
Graduates
Electrical engineering seniors were
interviewed yesterday regarding em-
ployment after graduation by William
E. Wickenden, personnel manager of
the engineering department of the
Western Electric company. Mr. Wick-
enden's purpose was to describe the
general aspects of work with his con-
cern, preliminary to his visit here
next March, when he will make defi-
nite arrangements for employment.
Men accepting positions will begin
work in the New York office of the
company at an approximate salary of

$30 a week, with additional compensa-
tion for previous engineering experi-
ence.
The general slump in business ac-
tivity, according to Mr. Wickenden,
has not affected his industry as much
as others, due to its connection with
public seivice utilities. Although
there is a slightly lessened demand
for men this year, enough positions
are open to accommodate those gradu-

Former Captains
Will Talk Track
All mep. interested in track are in-
vited to attend the annual track pep
meeting at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday, Jan.
25, in the Physics lecture room.
Speeches will be made by several
officials and former track stars.
An outline of the prospects for the
track season will be presented by
Coach Steve Farrell. Prof. Ralph W.
Aigler, chairman of the Board in
Control of Athletics, will discuss the
eligibility rulings and P. G. Bartel-
me, director of outdoor athletics, is
to speak on this year's trac6 sched-
ule.
Short pep talks will also be given
by former captains, "Eddie" Carroll,
17, "Red" Donnelly, '19, Carl John-
son, '20, this year's captain, 'Larry"
Butler, '21, and Harry Carver, '15.
MONTREAL UNEMPLOYED
RECEIVINGFREE MEAS
Montreal, Canada, Jan. 21.-The city
tonight served notice on its unemploy-
ed that free meals would be served
them at any hour of the day or night
but that disorder would be sternly
suppressed. This notice was issued
after several raids had been made on
restaurants by ex-service men, who
dispersed in one case without disor-
der after food had been served them
and melted away upon the sight of
the heavy police guard around another
establishment.
Police leaders wh during the day
held reserves in readiness for any em-
ergency, theh closed'the headquarters
of the exservice men's unemployment
association which this afternoon had
announced the raid had not been au-
thorized. Paraders also were searched
for -weapons but no arrests were
made.
New Debate Form
Given Trial Here
Michigan experienced its first no-
decision debate when it met North-
western in Hill auditorium last night,
speaking on the advisability of the
parliamentary form of government for
the United States. Michigan took the
affirmative here. At the same time
Michigan's negative team took the
negative side against Chicago at Chi-
cago and Chicago met Northwestern
at Northwestern.
Thosein charge of debating at Mich-
igan were rather skeptical of the
idea of continuing the system of no-
decision debates, believing that the
contest was incomplete, or rather
that the "kick" was lacking. The half
hour following the debate was given
over to allowing the audience to ask
questions. This carried out the idea
of informing rather than winning.
A, I. FRAZER, '81; SUCCESSFUL
DETROIT LAWYER, SUCCUMBSj
Allan H. Frazer, '81, died Thursday
afternoon at his home in Detroit aft-
er a long and successful career as a
lawyer. He was one of the oldest
members of the Detroit bar, having
ben admitted in 1882. In 1889 he was
made assistant prosecuting attorney,
in 1913 was made attorney for the
police department, and later became

corporation counsel. While occupy-
ing these offices he won fame in rid-]
ding Wayne county of lawlessness and
dishonest politicians.
Besides his widow, Mr. Frazer is,
survived by a son and daughter, John
P. Frazer and Mrs. Charles M. Car-
michael, both of Detroit.
LOUNSBERY WILL TALK ABOUT
COLLEGE MEN IN BUSINESS
A practical instructor as well as
an expert cost :accountant, Gilbert
Lounsbery of the Fisher Body cor-
poration of Detroit, who speaks at:
3:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon in they
assembly hall of the Union, will tell'
how he trains young men who wish.
to learn accounting in the 18 fac-,
tories under his supervision. In his'
informal talk on "Diamonds or Chips":
he will tell in addition what the busi-
ness world demands of the college
man. This is the second of the se-:
ries of Sunday afternoon meetings
given under the auspices of the
Union. l

Principle of Charter Commission
Safeguard Public without
Repelling Capital

to

'FIME LIMITS OF FRANCHISES
AND CITY RIGHTS, ISSUES
"Ann Arbor would be particularly
well guarded against the encroach-
ments of public utilitiescorporations,
under the proposed charter," said
Prof. Edwin C. Goddard of the Law
school, yesterday concerning the
provisions for governing public utili-
ties corporations under the propos-
ed charter.
"The guiding principle of the char-
ter commission," he said, "has been
to safeguard the public as far as pos-
sible without tieing down the util-
ities so that they could not attract
capital. We have worked in the be-
lief that the interests of the city and
the companies are one in that the ob-
ject of a public service is to manage
the company so that the investors will
have a fair return on their capital
and so that the public will receive
satisfactory service at a price as low
as is consistent with good earnings
and efficient management."
Provisions Fundamental
"The provisions are of the most
fundamental character, as much must
be left to negotiations varying with
the character of the utility concern-
ed. The principle provisions concern
the time limit of franchises, rights of
the company to sell the franchise,
rights of the city to govern or pur-
chase the franchise, and stipulations
as to the rights of citizens to know
of the conduct of the company.
"In the first place, only a 30 year
franchise can beagranted and that
only upon a three-fifths vote of the
people. The council can grant a re-
vocable franchise but upon petition
of five per cent of the voters any
franchise must be submitted to them.
A majority vote may allow it to go'
into effect. If additional privileges
are added to the original document,
they must terminate with the orig-
inal. The street car troubles in De-
troit about rights of franchise, some
of which have expired while others
still are in effect, show the need of
this rovision.
City Will Govern Sale
"A company holding a franchise
may not sell it to another company
without the consent of the city by a
majority vote. This will prevent
owner:hip by any large corporation
with its offices in New York, whose
interests in the concern are only in
the size of the check coming from
Ann Arbor to New York.
"At the termination of any fran-
chise the city may purchase the plan
according to provisions in the docu-
ment, or if there are no terms fixed,
then by condemnation.
Companies Will Report Annually
"The right is reserved to the city
to regulate in the most complete
manner all utilities for the safety,
welfare and accommodation of the
city. Under this provision the use of
the same poles by two companies, in-
terchange of transfer service, and
other similar economies may be or-
dered by the city. If the city grants
a franchise it shall never be requir-
ed to pay for it, either upon purchase
by the city or in fixing rates to be
charged. 0
"Another great cause of dispute be-
tween the companies and the public
has been the lack of knowledge by
the public of the investment and
earnings of the company. The char-
ter requires full and complete rec-
ords to be kept by the utilities, with
full reports annually and a right of
inspection at all reasonable times."
ANN ARBOR MAYOR APPOINTS
DELEGATES TO ROAD CONGRESS

Mayor Wurster, of Ann Arbor, has
appointed Prof. Arthur H. Blanchard,
of the highway engineering and trans-
port department, and John J. Cox,
Washtenaw county highway commis-
sioner, to attend the annual good roads
congress and national good roads show
to be held at the Coliseum in Chicago,
Feb. 9 to 12. The congress is called
for the purpose of discussing the
problems confronting highway officials
and the up-to-date methods of high-
way construction and maintenance.

PROPOSED CHRE
WILLROFC GUODARD CITY

Courses Changed
In literary College
The supplementary announcement
of the Literary college for the second
semester indicates that a number of
courses will be omitted and others
added to those announced in the cat-
alogues at the beginning of the year.
Those which will be omitted next
semester are Botany 12, 30; Econom-
ics 10; Education 14; History 52, 54,
58; Latin 2 Sec. 2, 16a; Public Speak-
ing 1b; French 5a, 8 Sec. 4 and 5,
14a Sec. 5.
The following new courses are of-
fered: "The elements of Political
Economy" by Prof. David Friday,
which is open to students who have
had courses la or 1E; "The Prin-
ciples of Education" by Prof. A. S.
Whitney, which is designed for the
analysis of the individual process, the
social process, and the educational
process; "The Annals of Tacitus" and
also "Epigrams" by Prof. H. A. San-
ders.
Additional provisions have also
been made for the rhetoric depart-
ment.
'FAMOUS HUMOR S1K OISHT
Popular Canadian Humorist Moved
Big Audience Last Year, Says
Professor Trueblood
ORATORICAL PROGRAM SPEAK
ER ONE OF BEST ON COURSE
Stephen Leacock, who speaks at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium on
the subject, "Literary Follies of the
Day," is one of the best speakers on
this year's oratorical program, ac-
cording to an opinion expressed yes-
terday by Prof. Thomas Trueblood of
the oratory department.
The professor asserted: "The audi-
ence at Leacock's lecture last year
was the most responsive that I have
heard since Mark Twain was here in
1884. Leacock kept his house in hi-'
larity from the moment he began his
speech until he ended."
Leacock's humor has appeared in
many American publications, among
them Judge, Harper's and Vanity
Fair, and critics declare him to be one
of the wittiest of present day writ-
ers. At present he is a professor of
political economy at McGill univer-
sity, from which institution he was
graduated. The Canadian professor
will be banqueted by several faculty
members during his stay in the city.
MARDIGRAS REVELRY T
LEAGUE PARTY TONIGHT
MASKS, COSTUMES, MUSIC, AND
DANCING ON EVENING'S
SCHEDULE
Gay costumes, music, dancing and
"minstrelsy" will combine to give the
Women's league fancy dress party
this evening a typical Mardi Gras at-
mosphere. Just as in New Orleans,
Mardi Gras with its revelry and mer-
ryma-king precedes the solemn time
of Lent, so will the masked dance
precede the serious and thoughtful

season of examinations.
The party will begin at 8 o'clock,
when guests, unmasked,- will enter
Barbour gymnasium by the lower
door.1 The junior class stunt will be
given at 8:15 o'clock, and following
it, between dances, Newberry resi-
dence, Pi Beta Phi, Alpha Chi Ome-
ga, and Alpha Xi Delta will enact
their stunts.
At 9:30 o'clock the grand march
will take place, and costumes will be
judged. The rest of the evening will
be taken up with dancing and stunts
by the sophomore class, Kappa Kappa
Gamma sorority, Martha Cook build-
ing, O'Hara house, Gamma Phi Beta
sorority, the senior class, Gill house,
and the freshman class.
The gymnasium has been attrac-
tively decorated for the dance, and
has taken on a gay, holiday appear-
ance. An All-girl orchestra consist-,
ing of picked players from the Girls''
Mandolin club will furnish the mu-'
sic.

RELIEF FUND DRIVE FOR BENEFIT OF
EUROPEAN STUDENTS, CHILDREN AND
STARVING CHINESE TO OPEN TUESDAY

IMPORTANT MEETING
OF UPPERCLASSMEN
There will be a meeting of all
junior and senior men in Union
assembly hall promptly at 2:30
o'clock Sunday afternoon for the
discussion of campus problems.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL,
By Le Grande A. Gaines, Jr.,
President.
ATHLTIC BOARD ACTS
ON STADIUM TONIGHT
INADEQUATE SEATING CAPACITY
OF PROPOSED "U" CAUSES
ITS REJECTION
The advisability of revising the stad-
ium construction plans will be con-
sidered at the meeting of the Board
in Control of Athletics tonight at the
Union. The meeting has been called
by the president of the board after ar-
rangements for the erection of a
$400,000 concrete "U" had been prac-
tically completed, because it was
deemed unwise to build a stadium
which would have a seating capacity
of only 43,000.
It is believed by the officials that
this would be an inadequate number
of seats for future requirements, and
since the "U" plans provide no means
for enlargement a new scheme for
building will have to be worked out.
The proposition which has been of-
fered is to build permanent stands of
wood and steel at the' west end of
Ferry field with a capacity of from
10,000 to 12,000 to provide for increas-
ed attendance for the next three or
four years. In the meantime provis
ions will be made for the erection of
a stadium of the Yale bowl type, which
could be added to as the needs de-
manded.
Faculty Perform
Clever Comedy
(By L. P. W.)
No knowledge of French was nec-
essary to appreciate the one act com-
edy, "Un Monsieur qui ' Prend la
Mouche" (The Touchy Gentleman),
presented last night in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall by the French faculty,
under the auspices of the Cercle
Francais. Students of French had a
rare opportunity to view their in-
structors "in action," and the ap-
plause following the play was a sign
of their appreciation.
Prof. Rene Talamon, taking the
part of Beaudeduit, the touchy young
Frenchman, kept up a rapid fire ac-
tion throughout that greatly enliven-
ed the play, and proved him quite ca-
pable of taking the difficult role re-
quired. Mrs. A. 0. Lee charmingly
took the part of Cecile, the young
lady whom Beaudeduit eventually
marries. Her clearly spoken French
and stage presence characterized her
as a natural actress.
Mr. Charles Carry, as the father,
proved highly entertaining, and his
interpretation of the part was excel-
lently done. Mr. Edouard Mathieu,
as the impertinent servant, furnished
numerous laughs, while Prof. Arthur
Canfield as the aged friend of the fa-
ther, and Mr. Antoine Jobin, as the
servant of Beaudeduit, supplied the
remainder of a truly well-rounded

cast. Dancing in Barbour gymna-
sium followed the play.
Committee Is Shown University Needs
Concluding its investigation of the
needs of the University yesterday
morning, the joint committee from the
senate and house of representatives
of the state legislature returned to
Lansing yesterday afternoon. The
committee spent the morning in con-
ference with President Marion L. Bur-
ton. A luncheon was given in the
Union at noon for the members of the
committee.

$15,000 IS MICHIGAN'S QUOTA;
PRESIDENT WILL ADDRESS
" WORKERS
"SAVE A LIFE" TO BE
SLOGAN FOR CAMPAIGN
Campus Societies Will Go Soliciting
Among Independents Speakers
Will Visit Houses
"Save a life" will be the slogan of
the Michigan relief fund drive for the
benefit of needy European students
and children and the starving Chinese
which will be inaugurated next Tues-
day on the campus. Organization
plans for the drive are rapidly nearing
completion and the committed is plan-
ning to put forth prodigious efforts
to raise the quota of $15,000 which has
been set.
Three Campaigns Combined
Three nation-wide campaigns will
be included in the campus drive--the
campaign for the department of stu-
dent relief, that for the European chil-
dren's fund, and that for the Chinese
relief fund. Similar drives are being
made in all other universities in the
fund. Similar drives are being made
in all the other universities in the
country, and at those institutions where
the campaigns have already been held
the students have shown their appre-
ciation of the worth of the different
causes by contributing generously.
The University of Illinois raised $30,-
000-twice the total set as Michigan's
goal.
Fred J. Petty, '21, is chairman of the
drive, which is under the general di-
rection of the Student council. Don-
ald Thorpe, '21, and Clarence John
ston, 21E, have been selected to take
charge of the independents among the
men. The campaign among the fra-
ternities is under the supervision of
George Duffield, '21. Marguerite Clark,
'21, has complete charge of the drive
among the women on the campus.
The campaign will also be carried'on
among the members of thefaculty,
Societies Called On
The various campus societies will be,
called upon to wage the campaign
among the independent men. Each so-
ciety is being called upon to furnish
a certain number of workers each
of whom will be given a list of men
to solicit. Following is a list of the
societies and the number of solicitors
each is expected to supply: Triangl-
es, 20; Sphinx, 15; Vulcans, 20;
Druids, 12; Web and Flange, 12;
Quarterdeck, 18; Griffins, 20; LesVoy-
ageurs, 12; Craftsmen, 25; Commerce
club, 20; Forestry club, 10; Men's
Educational club, 20; Cabinet club, 15;
Scalp and Blade, 20; Saginaw club,
20; Newark club, 5; Bayonne club,
5; Mt. Clemens club, 10; Rochester
club, 10; Round Up club, 15; South
African club, 10; Chinese club, 30
Cosmopolitan club, 20; New England
club, 15; Tau Beta Pi, 20; Westerners,
15.
The quotas of the following socie-
ties have not been determined as yet:
Pontiac club, Dixie club, Pennsylva-
nia club, and Canadian club. Since
these societies will have the solicita-
tion of the-majority of the students in
their hands they are being heavily
counted on to put the drive over the
top.
Will Try for 100 Per Cent
The chairman of the campaign in
the fraternities has selected a group
of speakers who will visit every house
on the campus either next Tuesday
(Continued on Page Six)
ADDITIONAL TRYOUTS WANTED
NOW FOR UNION OPERA CAST

More tryouts for the Union opera
are wanted. especially singers. The
size of the cast is larger than last
year as is also the total number to
appear on the stage, also the roles
are more difficult. A larger number
of tryouts are needed in order to en-
able E. Mortimer Shuter, director of
the opera, to find a sufficient number
of men to meet exacting requirements.
The need is felt notwithstanding the
fact that more men have come out
during this week than appeared dur-
ing the entire tryout period last year.
The cast will be tentatively chosen
by Feb. 1 when tryouts will cease.

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