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October 13, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-13

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY UNSETTLED
WEATHER TODAY

ot
Aflir I an

kit

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WlRE
SERVICE

I

. _

VOL. XXXI. No. 8. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, O.CTOBER 13, 1920 PRICE THREE CENTS

t t

CLEELANDTALES,
SERIES, WINNING
FOURTH STRAIGHT
ONLY TWO BROOKLYN PLAYERS
REACH SECOND
BASE
STANLEY COVELESKIE
BRINGS TEAM SUCCESS
Robinson Praises Wonderful Team
Work of Cleveland Organiation
Throughout Series
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Oct. 12.-The Cleveland
American League club won the su-
preme title in baseball here this aft-
ernoon, when the Indians defeated the
Brooklyn Nationals In the seventh and
deciding game of the 1920 series, by
a score of 3 to 0.
Tonight Cleveland is celebrating in
a manner adequately in keeping with
the honor, and it is doubtful if a
government proclamation announcing
the selection of this city as the future
capital of the United States would
create a ripple of interest among the
frenzied fans.
Coveleskie Star Pitcher
The shutout victory was chiefly en-
gineered by Stanley Coveleskie, the
spitball ace of the local team, who
has proved to be a pitcher of remark-
able skill and endurance during the
series. Backed by air tight defense on
the part of his team mates at critical
moments of the game, Coveleskie let
the Robins down with five hits. Only
two Brooklyn players reached second
base and only five of the invaders were
left on bases.
Coveleskie's feat, in winning three
of the five games necessary to clinch
the championship, will go down as one
of the outstanding features of world
series victories.
Indians Deserve Champonship
In the shutting out of the Nation-
als in the final game this afternoon
the Indians, led by Manager Speaker,
rose to playing heights whih bore out
the complete confidence of the club
backers and fans in their ability to
prove their right to wear the base-
ball palm of the universe. They
reached the spitters of Burleigh
Grimes, the National league hurlers,
for seven hits; clinched their game
before the half way mark, and top-
ped the play with several pieces of
baseball strategy that has marked the
team as a championship organization.
"Cleveland has a wonderful ball club
and Tris Speaker and his men cer-
tainly deserve the splendid support
they have reecived from the city,"
Wilbert Robinson, manager of the
Brooklyn Dodgers, manager of the
was a well fought and earnestly play-
ed series. We did our best but we
could not hit the Cleveland pitchers."
After the game it was announced by
the national commission that the paid
attendance was 27,525, the largest of
any of the seven games. Receipts
were $83,900.
Library Showing
Specimens of 18th
Century Writings

Books from the Library's collec-
tions of English dramatic literature
have been placed on exhibit for sev-
eral weeks in the male corridor of the
general library. The exhibit is plan-
ned primarily for the educators who
will be in Ann Arbor for President
Marion L. Burton's inauguration and
also for showing the scope of the
dramatic collection of the 18th cen-
tury in the Library.
Facsimilies of early plays by
Shakespeare's predecessors and by
Shakespeare are being shown. Sever-
al eases are devoted to Shakespeare,
exhibiting editions of his works,
translations, and adaptations.
Another case is devoted to books
with the lives of famous actors of the
18th century. One book written in
1797 is for the instruction of young
clergymen.
"She Stooped to Conquer," by Doc-
tor Goldsmith, and "Irene," by Sam-
uel Johnson, are some of the dramas
exhibited.

Former Professor
Dies In Colorado
James H. Brewster, Ph.D., LL.B.,
former professor in the Michigan Law
school, died in Denver, Colo., Oct. 7,
according to information received by
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school. A general breakdown was
given as the cause of death.
Professor Brewster, a graduate of
Yale university in 1877, took his LL.B.
in 1879, and went to Detroit to prac-
tice law. In 1897 he was made a pro-
fessor of the law of conveyancing in
the Michigan Law school. During his
time at Michigan Professor Brewster
wrote a book, several magazine ar-
ticles, and did considerable other in-
vestigation work.
Developing tuberculosis in 1910
Professor Brewster left for the West,
where he practiced law in Colorado
for four years until he felt strong
enough to assume a proffered position
as professor in the University of Col-
orado law school. After a year there,
he engaged in private practice in Den-
ver until the time of his death.
Dean Bates, speaking of Professor
Brewster while in the University said
"Professor Brewster was a sound,
scholarly man with a keen analytic
mind that made him an expert in his
field. His inspiring personality was
a factor recognized by all who came
in contact with him and made him a
man both popular and respected in the
Law school."
At the time of his death, Professor
Brewster was making an indexed di-
gest of the first 19 volumes of the
Michigan Law Review.
INITIAL MEETING OF
COUNCIL TO 01 TONIGHT
MANY IMPORTANT MATTERS TO
BE TAKEN CARE OF
BY BODY
The Student council will hold its
first meeting bf the year at 7:15
o'clock tonight in room 306 of the
Union.
The presid~ent hopes to get a line on
the work of each of the members for
the coming year at this time so that
the various committees may be ap-
pointed as soon as possible. All mem-
bers are requested to be present.
There are several important mat-
ters that must be taken care of at
once by the council, among which are
Traditions day, the pep meetings for
the Illinois and Chicago games, fall
games between the two underclasses,
freshman conduct, and campus activ-
ities in general.
The president wishes it understood
that the council desires at all times
to serve the best interests of the cam-
pus, and he wants all students to
feel free to offer suggestions.
MANY TO VOTE BY
ABSENT BALLOTS
More than 250 students including
25 girls have sent home their applica-
tions for ballots and many of this
number have also registered by mail,
a representative of the Republican
club stated yesterday afternoon. This
club furnishes free the necessary
blanks for all students who wish to
vote by mail.
It has been estimated by the club
that there are 2,000 student voters
here from the states of Ohio, Indiana,
Illinois and New York. Since these
states are the crucial ones in the pres-

idential campaign this year, the club
feels more than justified in making
the effort to poll these votes.
Many able speakers are being se-
lected at the present time to come
here to address the students in the
near future, said a representative of
the club. He stated that meetings
would be held soon, the first probably
next week.
ASTRONOMY STORY HAS NO
BASIS PROF. HUSSEY STATES
Prof. W. J. Hussey, of the astro-
nomical department, states, in an an-
nouncement in today's Official Bulletin
that the practical demonstrations
and engagement of instructors to take
care of this work as appeared in a
story in The Daily of Saturday is con-
trary to facts.
The basis of the article was the
view of an assistant, and Professor
Hussey says that they were not sanc-
tioned by him.

GREEK, 1u YEARS OLD,
YOUNGEST FRESHMAN
Spiros Vinieratos '24E, only
15 years old, is the youngest
freshman on the campus. He
completed the work in the gym-
nasium in his home town of Ar-
gostoli, on the island of Cep-
hallenia, Greece, and came hereI
to study marine architecture. f
His father, mayor of Argos-
toli, came with him as far as
New York, but from there he
came alone. Vinieratos has had
only two. years of English at his
home, and although he can read j
quite fluently, he has difficulty
in understanding the lectures.
He has no friends or relatives
in America, but he expects to
remain here during the four
years of his course, before he
returns home.
LAW SCHOOL GRDS
PASS 6BAREM
Every Michigan Man Passes Rigid
Tests Given Recently by State
of Illinois
LOCAL DEPARTMENT RATED
HIGH AS RESULT OF SHOWING
Figures showing the efficiency of
the Michigan Law school have recently
been received that place the work
done here far above that of the ma-
jority of law schools.
Illinois Record Good
In the recent Illinois state bar ex-
aminations, in which men from law
schools all over the country took part,
there were 400 men who took the
tests. Of this 400, only 37 per cent
passed, this percentage being a fair
average according to officils, and it
is not exceptionally low. The striking
fact about the examination was that
every Michigan man who took the ex-
amination passed. Advices report that
several of the Mid-West law schools
were hard hit by the showing of their
men.
In the Ohio state bar examinations
this fall the percentage of those
passed is not available, but the re-
ports show that all Michigan men
passed in these also.
All Pass Fall Exams
Last spring, when the Michigan
state bar examinations were given,
92 men entered. Of this number 42
passed, making the percentage 45.7.
The fall examinations were given re-
cently, and every Michigan man en-
tered in the tests passed.
Authorities in the Law school are
highly pleased with this showing as it
bears out the confidence placed in this
school by the leading law firms of the
country, many of whom place re-
quests with the dean every year for
men to enter their offices. Figures
from the Dean's office show that more
requests for Michigan graduates were
received last year than ever before
and that the number has been steadi-
ly increasing.
BROOKLYN THROUGH WITH
MARQUARD, SAYS EBBETTS
Cleveland, Oct. 12.-Pres. Charles
Ebbetts of the Brooklyn National
league club, tonight announced that
Rube Marquard who was fined -$1.00
and costs today for violating the ex-

hibition ticket ordinance would never
play with Brooklyn again.
"I'm through with him absolutely,"
said Mr. Ebbetts. "He hasn't been re-
leased, however, and if anybody else
wants him, they can have him but
Marquard will never again put on a
Brooklyn uniform."
ADELPHI SOCIETY HAS
FIRST MEETING OF YEAR
The Adelphi House of Representa-
tives convened for the 11th session in
Adelphi hall. George D. Wilner of the
oratorical faculty spoke to the society
on 'The Man Who Does Make a
Team."
Mr. Wilner was followed by short
talks by L. Grubaugh, 22, P. H. Scott,
22, J. Hindes, 21, 0. Brown, 21, S.
Shetzer, 21, and H. August, 21. There
were a large number of new men pres-
ent.

POLISH-RUSS PACT
IN EFFECT* 19TH
AN)UNCEMENT BRINGS LARGE
CROWDS TO PUBLIC
SQUARE
TREATY OF GIVE AND
TAKE BETWEEN NATIONS
Riga Settlement to Put Bolsheviki at
Peace with All Their Baltic
Neighbors
(By Associated Press)
Riga, Oct. 12.-A preliminary peace
treaty' and armistice was signed by
the Polish and Russian soviet peace
delegates at 7:10 o'clock tonight. The
armistice actually becomes effective
at midnight Oct. 18 or 144 hours
from midnight tonight. The announce-
ment ,that peace was to be signed
brought great crowds to the public
square.
About 200 persons, including the
entire diplomatic body and prominent
Lettish officials, crowded a small
room, many of them standing.
Fear Treaty Will Not Satisfy
The head of the soviet delegation
described the peace as "a peace with-
out victo.ry and without vanquished"
in a brief address before the signing
of the treaty. That describes the Riga
agreement as it appeared to disinter-
ested onlookers. It was a peace of
give and take which followers fear
will not be popular with either the
Poles or the Soviet.
The Riga armistice will put the Bol-
sheviki at peace with all their Baltic
neighbors and leave the Wrangle
movement as the only great military
operation remaining against the So-
viets.
Nations Tired of War
M. Jompe called attention to the
many difficulties encountered in ar-
ranging the armistice and also to the
harmonious manner in which the del-
egations carried out the negotiations.
He also expressed the belief that the
foundation had been laid for a per-
manent peace, as both nations are ab-
solutely tired of war and unwilling to
assume the responsibility for continu-
ing the struggle.
MAU DEFEATS
SIRBARUTON 8 LENGTHS

DECLINES MOVIE OFFER
TO WEAR FRESHMAN POT

f r

1 hWouldtyou turn down a
chance to make a trial picture1
for two prominent picture pro-
ducing companies, the success
of which would mean the sign-
ing of a five year contract?
Would you turn this down after
you had been a successful en-]
trant in a contest of a New York
publishing house and had your
picture published in the Motion
Picture magazine and in Film
Fun? Really, would you do all
this Just to come to Ann Arbor
and wear a freshman pot?
Well, there is one man who
did and he is Leo Niedzielski,
one of the several thousands of
yearlings who daily trot about
the campus in quest of knowl-
edge.
All of the above happened to
Leo, yet he prefers to be a stu-
dent at Michigan.
ROOM COMMITTEE
FACES DIFFICULTY
Wholesale Exodus of Students from
Contracted Rooms Causes Con-
siderable Trouble
PRICES FALL SUDDENLY AS
HOUSING SPACE INCREASES
Considerable difficulty is being ex-
perienced by the committee on appeal
in connection with the housing situ-
ation because of a wholesale exodus
within the last few days of students
from contracted rooms.
The large number of rooms available
in Ann Arbor at the present time has
been the cause of a sudden lowering
of room rents by landladies. In many
cases students shave moved out of
contracted rooms, taking quarters at
a much lower figure.
Complaints Received
Complaints have been received by
the housing committee from irate
landladies who are left with empty
rooms, and the committee has taken a
firm stand in regard to the situation.
No student may vacate, according to
the committee, any room or suite of
rooms contracted for, until the end of
the semester, without first securing a
tenant to take his place. In the event
that an exorbitant figure is being
charged for the rooms, the matter will
be ironed out by the housing commit-
tee.
Troubles Settled
Few differences of the latter type
have been brought to the attention of
the committee, but in each case they
have been settled to the satisfaction
of both landlady and student-tenant.
The housing committee will be in
session to hear all complaints from 2
to 3:30 o'clock Wednesday, Thursday,
and Friday afternoons of this week
in room 302 of the Union.
SOCIETY HEADS TO
MEET WITH COOLEY
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the
engineering college will meet with
C. N. Johnston, '21E, president of the
Engineering society, the four presi-
dents of the different branches of the
society, and the managing editor and
business manager of the Technic, T.
R. Gustafson, '21E, and W. R. Harri-
son, '21E, respectively, at 10 o'clock
Saturday morning in his office.
The meeting is for the purpose of

arranging the activties for the coming
year to the plan of the new constitu-
tion of the Engineering society.
The society will hold meetings twice
a month during the present year in
order that the faculty and the students
may be brought into closer contact
with one another.
PROFESSOR SCOTT TO TELL
OF EXPERIENCES IN EUROPE
Prof. Fred N. Scott of the Rhetoric
department will be the speaker at the
meeting of the Quadrangle society this
evening. Taking as his subject "A
Tale of Two Cities," Professor Scott
will give the impressions he received
while in England and France during
the past summer, when he went as
one of the American delegates to the
Anglo-American Conference of Pro-
fessors of English.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR
INAUGURATION DAY
ARECMPLTE9
DELEGATES AND OFFICIALS WILL
BEGIN TO ARRIVE THIS
EVENING
RECEPTION AND SMOKER
TO BE GIVEN TONIGHT
Advance Copies of President's Speech
Have Been Mailed.,to State
and National Papers
With the selection of the line of
march for the academic procession
and designation of places of assembly
for the units participating, practical-
ly all the important arrangements
were completed yesterday afternoon
for the inauguration of President Mar-
ion L. Burton at 10:30 o'clock to-
morrow morning.
Start from U. Hall
Forming in front of University hall,
the procession will move along State
street to North 'University avenue, to
the library, then to Waterman gymna-
sium, and down North University ave-
nue to Hill auditorium. There will be
no procession in case of rain. A de-
tailed statement as to places of as-
sembly for those taking part In the
procession is made this morning in
The Daily Official Bulletin.
Students not holding tickets or -the
exercises will assemble at 8:30
o'clock south of the Engineering
building on South University avenue.
Delegates and official guests will be-
gin to arrive this evening, according
to Prof. W. P. Lombard, chairman of
the sub-committee on hospitality. All
who have been registered are to be
entertained at the homes of faculty
members and citizens of Ann Arbor.
Visiting university trustees and re-
gents will be the guests of the Uni-
versity at the Michigan Union.
To Show Guests City
Auto service, under the direction of
Prof. H. P. Thieme, will be provided,
and guests will be met at the train
and taken to the homes where they
are to be entertained. Cars marked
"Committee" will be on the streets
at all times for the disposal of guests
and their hosts. Drives through the
city have been arranged for Thursday
and Friday afternoons.
President Burton and Mrs. Burton
will be at home informally tonight to
delegates and guests, and the Univer-
sity club will give a smoker during
the evening for the early arrivals.
University hall and other buildings
are being decorated with American
flags and the University colors, yel-
low and blue.
Mal Copies of Speeches
Advance copies of the address of
President Burton on "The Function of
the State University," were mailed
last night to 650 papers inethe state
of Michigan by the committee on pub-
licity, of which Prof. J. L. Brumm is
chairman. Copies were also sent to
30 leading papers throughout the
country. Abstracts of speeches to be
delivered at the educational confer-
ence were sent out earlier.
Mrs. Booth Will
Talk Here Mron day

Mrs. Maude Ballington Booth,
known as "the little mother of the
prisons," will speak at 8 o'clock Mon-
day evening in Hill auditorium under
the auspices of the King's Daughters
of the Congregational church. Mrs.
Booth and her husband, the son of
General Evangeline Booth, of the Sal-
vation Army, founded the Volunteers
of America.
The work of this organization is to
re-establish released prisoners and to
look after their families during the
term of imprisonment. The prisoners
have given Mrs. Booth her title in
appreciation of her talks to them and
the interest she has taken in their
welfare. During the war she was
overseas with the Y. M. C. A.
Mrs. Booth is an English woman, a
sister of Florence Barclay, author of
"The Rosary." She will be entertain-
ed at Helen Newberry residence while
she is in Ann Arbor.

AMERICAN JOCKEY SLOWS
MOUNT IN LAST
QUARTER

UPI

(By Associated Press)
Windsor, Oct. 12.-The thorough-
bred championship of the continent
tonight rests on the American side
of the border. Man-of-War, the great-
est three year old of years, galloped
home with the honors at Kennilworth
Jockey club thisnafternoon, a full
eight lengths in front of Sir Barton,
the great four year old from Com-
mander J. K. L. Ross' stables. The
time was 2:03, more than a full. sec-
ond faster than the old Canadian rec-
ord for this distance.
Samuel D. Biddle of Philadelphia,
oowner of the victor, is the richer to-
night by $75,000, the purse, and a gold
cup valued at $5,000. The race was
over a course of a mile and a quarter1
at weight for age, the winner carrying
120 pounds to the loser's 126. Between
29,000 and 30,000 persons paid to see
the great horse race.
Sir Barton drew the pole and was
away with a jump, but the lead was
short lived. Jockey Kummer sent
Man-of-War alongside and then
ahead. When the stands were reach-
ed at the end of the first quarter, the
Biddle. horse had a two lengths lead.
Kummer kept Man-of-War in check
to the third quarter pole then let out
a wrap, and the great three year old
responded with a burst of speed that
left Sir Barton eight lengths behind
before the stretch was reached.
The last quarter mile around the
stretch was an easy gallop with Kum-
mer visibly easing up his mount.
The slow time was plainly due to
the fact that the victor was never in
danger from the time he took the
lead at the first sixteenth pole.

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