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January 21, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
NOT MIUCH CHANGE IN
TEM4PERATURE

rar1AIw

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

I

I

I

VOL. XXXI. No. 80. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

E I

CAN RID COUNTRY
OF SPECULATION
LIMIT QUANTITY HANDLED, SAYS
FORMER NATIONAL FOOD
ADMINISTRATOR
SUGGESTS BOARD TO
REGULATE EXCHANGES
Proposed Bureau of Markets Would
Aid in Co-operative Selling
of rarm Products
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 20. - Manipula-
tions in grain could be eliminated
through voluntary agreement of ex-
changes to limit the quantity of the
commodity where it could be handled
in speculative trade, Herbert Hoover,
formal federal food administrator,
said today, in appearing before the
house agricultural committee, which
is holding hearings on bills to re-
strict speculation in future ex-
changes.
For the improvement of marketing
conditions, Mr. Hoover suggested cr0-
ating under the department of agri-
culture a national marketing board
of experts with regulative powers
within limits over the exchanges.
"Such a board," he added, "could
assist materially in solving present
problems by establishing standard
practices and by laying down regula-
tions which would secure for farmers
the privilege of storing their grain
at country elevators. The farmers
would be given warehouse receipts on
which they could secure credit."
Assistance in developing co-opera-
tive marketing could be given by a
board such as he proposed, Mr. Hoov-
er said, suggesting that a bureau of
markets might perform administra-
tive functions.
Supplement Takes
up Vital Jfatters
Charging that Michigan is in a state
of coma as far as intellectual activity
on the part of students is concerned'
and depicting an attitude of absorp-
tion rather than one of research and
discussion in the pursuance of stud-~
les in the University, The Daily Sup-
plement for Sunday, Jan. 22, contains
the opinions of students from the cam-
pus at large as written and submitted
to the The Daily for publication.
Campus Evils Aired
Every conceivable campus evil is
aired and an attempt is made in most
instances to allocate the blame where
it is rightly due. The oft discussed
topics of fussing, loss of athletic pres-
tige, indifferent observance of time
honored Michigan traditions, and many
other vital questions are reviewed and
opinions offered both pro and con. The
discontinuance of the- J-Hop and the
general low morale of students other
than those interested in a professional
vocation are also topics accorded
places of prominence in the articles
written by the students in an effort to
change the order of affairs as they ex-
ist on the campus today.

Questions Discussed
Is Michigan asleep? Are we stu-
dents, as representatives of Michigan,
indifferent towards if not ignorant of
the pressing problems of the day and
hour? If so are we attempting to rem-
edy such woeful conditions or are we
satisfied to pass the responsibility to
others, recognizing as we do so that
either we are incapable or are indif-
fekent? These are some of the ques-
tions discussed in the issue.

WILL DEBATE HERE TONIGHT

HUMORIST SPEAKS
SATURDAY N1,G H T

Stephen Leacock Appears on
Oratorical Association

the

Michigan's.
and O.

Affirmative
A. Brown,

Debating Team, P. H. Scott, '22; L. E. Rariden, '21,
'21, Which Meets Northwestern Tonight.

IDEA Of UNIIERSITY CONOCUTION RECEIVES
HERTY BACKING Of PROMI NENT STDET

ONLY ONE
TO

DISAPPROVES OF PLAN
HAVE GENERAL
GATHERING

That convocations would have elim-
inated the situation which has arisen
because of the calling off of the Junior
Hop, and are a future need at the Un-
iversity was practically the unanimous
opinion yesterday, of- several students
prominent in campus activities. Var-
ious reasons were expressed for the
advisability of holding such meetings,
chief among them being that Mich-
igan's increasing size has made im-
possible personal contact between the
students and the professors and even
amongst the students themselves.
Le Grand A. Gaines, Jr., '21E, pres-
ident of the Student council, stated
that the meeting which has been call-
ed for Sunday afternoon in the Union,
was expressly for this purpose. He
supported the convocation idea.
"Michigan students," declared
Gaines, "undoubtedly lack the close
touch with the faculty which some
other universities enjoy, and the need
for closer contact is becoming more
noticeable as our members increase."
Would Improve Spirit
"In my opinion, convocations about
once a month would bring about a bet-
ter spirit of co-operation between the
students and the faculty.
"The large attendance at such meet-
ings would," he continued, "make open
discussion of campus matters impos-
sible. My idea is that juniors and
BURTON ON PROGRAM FOR
DETROIT ALUMNI MEET

.seniors, on the campus, should get to-
gether about once a month and I have
called such a meeting for Sunday aft-
ernoon. If the meeting is successful,
others Ill be held throughout the
year.
"It might be that sentiment express-
ed at these meetings could be brought
before the faculty by a joint meeting
of a committee, representing the Sen-
ate council, and a.committee consist-
ing of members of the Student coun-
cil. This plan is only as a suggestion.
I am heartily in favor of any ideas
which may better the understanding
between faculty and students."
Eaton Favors Plan
Paul Eaton, '21, president of the
Union, brought out the fact that in
such a manner Michigan's unwieldy
student body might be brought togeth-
er. He said: "If convocations were
given over to the presentation of im-
portant questions, then I believe that
they will prove of value to Michigan.
In the first place, they will do away
with the misunderstanding which now
exists, as a result of the recent action
of the Committee on Student Affairs;
secondly, they will aid the Student
council to better explain, than through
publications, the reason for certain of
its actions, and finally, they will cause
to bring together the student body
which seems too large to be reached
by any other means.
a- Problems Confusing
"Existing problems, perhaps confus-
ing to the members of the faculty,
may be presented at a convocation of
the entire student body, who I be-
lieve will show no hesitancy in making
sincere and frank expressions," assert-
ed Fred Petty, '21, president of the
senior lits. "Certainly such a plan
would bring about increased under-
standing and co-operation and tend to
alleviate many unnecessary difficul-
ties.
"All students wish to know Presi-
dent Burton better and if a definite
(Continued on Page Eight)

Program
"LITERARY FOLLIES OF THE
PRESENT DAY" IS SUBJECT
Stephen Leacock will be back in
Ann Arbor tomorrow night after an
absence of about a year. He will talk
on, "Literary Follies of the Present
Day," at 8 o'clock Saturday evening
in Hill auditorium.
The Canadian humorist, consider-
ed by many to be the best in Amer-
ica today, drew the best house of any
speaker appearing on the Oratorical
association program last year. It was
because of the constant appeals to
have him here this year that the as-
sociation booked him for tomorrow
night.
Many people, who think that pro-
fessors lack a sense of humor, might
be mistaken in hearing Leacock, as
he is head of the department of po-
litical economy at McGill university
of Canada.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB HAS
U LECTURES IN SERIES
LOCAL PROFESSORS TO DELIVER
ALL THE TALKS; COURSE
BEGINS FEB. 4'
Six numbers are listed on the pro-
gram of the Cosmopolitan lecture se-
ries announced yesterday by S. H. Lii,
'22, who has had charge of the ar-
rangements. Prof. Robert T. Crane,
of the political science department,
will open the series on Feb. 4, speak-
ing on the "League of Nations."
Other lecturers on the program
are:
Feb. 25-Professor Wilbur Humph-
reys, of the english department,
"Proverbial- Unwisdom."
March 11-Prof. 'E. C. Case, of the
geology department, "Our Common
Descent."
March 24-Prof. Guy M. Whipple,
of the department of education, "The
Search for Brains and Skill Among
Three Million Men."
April 1-Prof. David Friday, of the
economics department, "The Labor
Problem."
April 22-Prof. George LaRue, of
the zoology department, "Parasites."
COUNCIL COMITTEE DESIRES TO
SEE VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONS
A Student council committee de-
sires to meet authorized representa-
tives of the following organizations
at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon in room
306 of the Union: Griffins, Les Voy-
ageurs, Scalp and Blade, Rochesterl
club, Chinese club, New England
club, Pontiac club, Dixie club, Penn-
sylvania club, Upper Peninsula club,
Kentucky club, United States Marine
Corps, and Cosmopolitan club.

Tonight's Central Debating
contest, consisting of three
between teams of Michigan,
western, and Chicago, will be
because of the fact that no
decision will be given.
The reason for the change
it was thought that it wouldl

league
debates
North-
unique
judges'

Gabrilowitsch To
Present Concert
The next concert in the Choral
Union series will be given Monday
evening, Jan. 24, in Hill auditorium,
when Ossip Gabrilowitsch with the
Detroit Symphony will make its first
appearance in Ann Arbor this sea-
son.
To Gabrilowitsch belongs a great
deal of the credit for the wonderful
reputation made by this organization
during the years that it has been in
existence, it now ranking among the
half dozen great orchestras in the
UnitedStates. On its recent tour of
the great cities of the East it was
received with tremendous enthusiasm,
and critics were united in words of
highest praise.
NO-DECISION DEBATE TO
BE CONTESTED TONIGHT
MICHIGAN HAS AFFIRMATIVE
AGAINST NORTHWESTERN
TEAM

is
be

that
bet-

CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION
ENTERTAIN PRESIDENT
AT LUNCHEON

TOI

ter to give the audience a clear idea
of the subject debated rather than
to attempt to win, which would bring
in various means of trying to throw
the opposing side off guard and ob-
scure the subject. In order that the1
full spirit of the debate may be car-I
ried out, the half hour following the
contest will be devoted to answering
questions of the audience.
Michigan Has Affirmative
Michigan will take the affirmative
side against Northwestern at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
Michigan's team will be made up of
Preston H. Scott, '22, Lake E. Rar-..
den, '21, and Oscar A. Brown, '21. The
personnel of Northwestern's teamt
was not known up to last night. J
Question Stated
The question of the debate is: "Re-
solved That the Parliamentary Form1
of Government Should Be Adopted byf
the United States." Michigan's ieg-4
ative team meets Chicago at Chicago,
and Chicago's negative team meets]
Northwestern at Evanston.1
The plan of no decision contests is1
not to be considered permanent, ac-7
cording to officers of the Oratorical
association, who state that it is mere-
ly put on trial for this year.
French Faculty
Presents Comedy
Gilbert Lounsbery, chief cost ac-
countant for the Fisher Body corpora-
tion of Detroit, will speak at 3:30
o'clock Sunday afternoon in the As-'
sembly hall at the Union. This is'
the second of the series of Sunday
afternoon meetings held at the Union
to acquaint men with conditions they
will have to face after leaving the
University. It is the plan of Union
officials to bring to Ann Arbor the
recognized national leaders in each
line of work.
"Diamonds or Chips" was announc-
ed yesterday as the subject of Mr.
Lounsbery'stalk. Although his spe-
cialty has been cost accounting, he
will not confine himself to that
alone, but will discuss in a general
way the relationship between the col-
lege man and the business man.
A college graduate himself, he will
endeavor to point out just what is ex-
pected by a business man of a col-
lege man. He will distinguish be-
tween -what he considers is essential
in college courses, and what is not
essential.
Mr. Lounsbery's talk will begin
soon after the Junior-Senior meeting
called by the Student council to be
held at 2:30 o'clock Sunday after-
noon.
Iron County Club to Send Daily
At a meeting last evening of the
Iron County club it was decided to
send The Michigan Daily for the re-
mainder of the year to the high
schools of Iron county, including
Crystal Falls, Iron River, and Stam-
bough.

U~S MAlY S U PPORT
DSHRMAMENTOF
SENATE FOREIGN RELATIONS
COMMITTEE APPROVES
RESOLUTION
DISCUSSION OF PLAN
IN UPPER HOUSE SOON
Borah Proposal to Negotiate with
England and Japan for Naval
Reduction Favored
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 20. - A definite
step towards international disarma-
ment was taken by the senate for-
eign relations committee today in or-
dering a favorable report on the res-
olution of Senator Borah, Republi-
can, Idaho, proposing negotiations be-
tween the United States, Great Brit-
ain and Japan to reduce naval pro-
grams.
Discussion of the resolution in the
senate is not planned before next
week and action on it at the present
session of congress is conceded to be
in doubt. Advocates of the resolu-
tion, however, hope the senate debate
will give impetus to general disarma-
ment sentiment here and abroad.
The committee approved the Borah
resolution without a roll call after it
had voted down, 8 to 3, an alternative
resolution by Senator Walsh, Demo-
crat, Montana, proposing Aierican
participation in discussions of the
league of nations disarmament com-
mission.
Engineers Set
Time For Exams
Semester examinations in the engi-
neering college have been arranged,
and schedules will be ready for dis-
tribution at the office of Secretary L.
A. Hopkins within the next few days.
The date of examinations will be the
same as that for the literary college,
Feb. 7 to 12, inclusive. Morning sec-
tions commence at 8 o'clock, and aft-
ernoon exams at 2 o'clock. All con-
flicts should be reported to Prof. W.
L. Badjer, representing the classifica-
tion committee, in room 208, Chemis-
try building. The times for exami-
nation follow:
Monday classes-At 8, second Mon-
day morning; at 9, first Tuesday
morning; at 10, second Tuesday
morning; at 11, first Monday morn-
ing; at 1, second Thursday morning;
at 2, first Friday morning; at 3, first
Thursday afternoon.
Tuesday classes-At 8, first Satur-
day morning; at 9, first Thursday
morning; at 10, first Monday after-
noon; at+11, first Saturday after-
non; at 1, first Wednesday morning;
at 2, second Wednesday morning; at
3, second Wednesday afternoon.
Irregular examinations are: Shop
1, first Friday afternoon; shop 2,
second Tuesday afternoon; shop 3,
second Wednesday afternoon; shop
4, first Friday afternoon; drawing 4,
first Wednesday afternoon; drawing
5, first Tuesday afternoon; E. M. 1,
2, 5, first Tuesday afternoon; C. E.
2, first Tuesday afternoon; M. E. 3,
first Thursday afternoon.

LEGISLATURE COMMITTEE
INSPECTS UNIVERSITY

President Marion L. Burton will de-
liver an address at a mass meeting
of Detroit alumni of the University
which is to be given at the Detroit
Board of Commerce at 8:15 o'clock
on the evening of Thursday, Jan. 27.1
Both men and women graduates are
invited to attend the meeting.
This will be the first time that
President Burton has appeared be-
fore a meeting of the alumni in his
capacity as head of the University~.
and the Detroit committee is making
extensive preparations for the event.
Luncheon for Burton
President Burton will be entertain-
ed at luncheon at noon on the same
day by officials of the Detroit board
of education. In the afternoon he
will speak to the meeting of all the
teachers of Wayne county. He is to
be the guest of a number of prom-
inent citizens of Detroit at a private
dinner in the Detroit club previous
to his attendance at the mass meet-
ing.
U. of X. Club in Charge-
The mass meeting is being arrang-
ed under the direction of the U. of M.
club of Detroit. Committee members
in charge of the event are: Walter
S. Russel, general chairman; Charles
H. Campbell, chairman arrangement
committee; Sidney R. Small, vice-
chairman; Emmett Connolly, chair-
man of ticket distribution; George W.
Star, chairman of publicity commit-
tee.

Chinese Students' Club Stages
Unique Vaudeville Production

AN APPRECIATION
To the faculty members of the
University of Michigan, the Am-
erican friends on the relief com-
mittee, the student organiza-
tions, the churches, and the cit-.
izens of Ann Arbor who helped
to make the Spotlight a success,
we hereby tender our most sin-
cere thanks.
TSANG G. NI, Chairman,
Chinese Relief Committee.
(By Marion Stahl)
Extraordinarily unique was the in-
troduction to the. campus of Chinese
music, instruments and magic at the
Spotlight given by the Chinese Stu-
dents' club at Hill auditorium last
night. Most interest attached itself
to the exhibition of "Black Art" by
S. Q. Wong, '21E. The presentation
of Chinese magic, and later a danc-
ing skeleton in a specially lighted

apparatus were features not often'
seen on the American vaudeville'
stage.
Gowned in a robe which might have'
looked splendid on one of the old
Chinese empresses, Miss L. T. Fong,
'21, amused the audience by her
answers to questions propounded
through mental telepathy.
L. Y. Hu, '22, and J. Wu, grad.,
playing duets on the moon mandolin,
Chinese violin and other native in-
struments, took their hearers quite
by surprise in their rendition of
singular Oriental melodies. A Jew-
ish monologue by Arden Purvis, '22,
and "Just Talk" by George E. Sloan,
'23, drew a number of laughs. Rhodes
Brothers' orchestra furnished the
American jazz music for the evening
and responded to an encore. Theodore
Rhodes, '23, playing the saxophone,
received particularly favorable atten-
tion. The Union orchestra opened
and closed the program.
A large crowd attende the Spot-
light, the proceeds of which will be
sent to China for the relief of the
famine stricken millions.

Body

Made Up of Senators
Representatives; Burton
Consulted

and

IMPORTANT MEETING
OF UPPERCLASSMEN
There will be a meeting of all
junior and senior men in Union
assembly hall promptly at 2:30
o'clock Sunday afternoon for the
discussion of campus problems.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL,
By Le Grande A. Gaines, Jr.,
President.

A Joint committee from the senate
and house of representatives of the
State legislature made an inspection
of the University yesterday with spe-
cial regard to the needs of the insti-
tution as brought out in the building
program now before the legislature.
Four of the committee arrived Wed-
nesday night, and the other members
came in yesterday morning. The
committee conferred with President
Marion L. Burton in his offce. during
the morning. At noon they were en-
tertained at luncheon in t'he ' Union,
and in the afternoon they were taken
for an inspection of the campus
buildings.
The committee will conclude its
investigation today.

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