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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univei
ty year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
redited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ess matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business. 960 Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig
ature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence
ith. and notices of events will be published in The D)aily at the
scretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The l)ail oftice
nsigned communications will receive no consideration Nc , ma
script will be returned unless the writer incluses postage
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the entr+.' t -
essc~d in the communications,
"What's Going On" notices will not he received atter x "'1
the evening preceding insertion.
EIlTORpIAL 2TAFF
telepbone 2414

NAGING EDITOR

GEORGE 0 bROPH Y JR

ws Editor .-Chess..r M. Camphb
'hi tVditors-
T. H.Adams H. W. mlitchcock
B P Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I Dakin T W Sargent, ii
Renaud Sherwood
dx. Fditor .J . A. Bei'nstet
orials.. ............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Ken, T. 3.Whinery
stilNews ... .... . ,......... ,..........E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
ts............................... RobertA \ngell
men'sn Edito-., ..... . .........Mary D Lane
graph ....................................West Gallimzy
scope ....................................Jack W. Kelly

sephine Waldo
vlG (:Weber
zabeth Vickery
i~, Clark
orge Reindel
rothy Monfort
rry B. Grundy
,,ies Oberholtzer
,bert E.AAdams
3yron Darnton

Assistants
Thomas E, Dewey
Wallace. F.Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer
Hughston McBain
Frank H ,McPike
J. A. Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
J. W. Hume, Jr.
H. U. Howlett

M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr
Sara Waler

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER........LEGRANi) a. GAINES JR.
Advertising.....................................D. P. Joyce
lassifieds......................................Robt. O. Kerr
Publication ...................................F- M. Heath
Accounts ... ........................ R. Priehs
irculation ..... ..............................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
2. W. Lambrecht P. HHutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes'
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. ,Slawson
1.J H-arel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

ments, Mr. Erdman may be expected to use "Th
Wake" for all that is leftto him - apology.
Wisconsin is our friend -- a friend with whom
we are to come next year into still closer relations
through the resumption of gridiron contests be-
tween the two universities. That such a piece of
unthinking mudslinging should mar the growing
amity is inconceivable.
THE NEED FOR CONVOCATIONS
One of the most regrettable circumstances attend-
ing the abolition of the 1921 J-Hop, and the one
which rightly received the most censure, was that
the action was taken entirely without consultation
with the student body as a whole. The Committe
on Student Affairs failed completely to take th
campus at large into its confidence.
Assuredly most of the harmful publicity, at
least, could have been avoided if, before the con
mittee had taken action, the situation had been pre
sented at a meeting or convocation of the whole
student body, with notice that unless all rules were
lived up to the Hop would be abolished.
Emergencies such as this bring out conclusively
the need at Michigan of an institution found in
different forms in many of the colleges of both the
East and the West, but noticeably absent here. Wt
should have some arrangement for regular convo-
cations of the whole -University, attended by all
students on the call of the President.
At institutions where personal contact between
students and administration has been brought about
through such meetings, the plan has been highly ad-
vantageous to all concerned. At Williams, for in-
stance, when steps were being taken to abolish an
event prized in much the same way as the Hop is
here, the matter was adjusted with the minimum
friction by a presentation of affairs to the whole
student body.
Other schools have enjoyed the same benefits and
it has been found that in addition the convocations
are valuable in fostering school spirit, keeping stu-
dents in large institutions from drifting apart, and
giving an opportunity to hear prominent speakers.
Various plans for such university meetings have
been followed. In some places they exist in the
form of chapel, held daily. In others a certain
hour on a certain week day is held open by stu-
dents so that convocations may be called any week
if neessary. It is1probable that the latter system
would be best for Michigan. At any rate action
should be taken now - before schedules for next
semester are made out - to give Michigan the ad-
vantages of such convocations.
SHORTER COMMUNICATIONS
The Michigan Daily preserves a standing policy
favoring the expression of student and faculty
opinion as set forth in communications. Such let-
ters are constantly being received and, whenever
possible and when the subject under discussion is
one of sufficiently general interest, The Daily is in
the habit of running them in its columns.
The difficulty with most letters received, how-
ever, is that they are too long. Three hundred
words is the set limit and our small space combined
with the regular flood of copy makes it absolutely
essential that writers adhere to this maximum if
they wish their opinions published.
Up-to-the-minute conversation (heard freuently
in room C of the law building Tuesday)-"Oh, I'm
not on probation ! I'm iust taking these tests to get
an idea of my mentality."

tPETKOIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
.imited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., '7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e, ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. n.,
also 11:00 p. mn. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12: 10 p.m.

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
G A A M'S

Both

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

S

Upe the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
knn Arbor's buvers.-Adv.

Paronize Daily Advertters.-Adv.
Read The Daily for Campus News.

v

JANUARY
M T W T

S
2
9
30

3
10
17
241
31

4
11
18
25

12
19
26

13
20
27

F S
1
7 8
14 15
16 21 22
23 28 29

,. . a~a ,a

Persons wishing to sectre information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1921.
Night Editor-B. P. CAMPBELL.
There wil be a meeting of the Cubs' club
promptly at 4:15 o'clock today.
A REPLY TO LIBEL
Time was when the adage could be stretched to
read "All's fair in love, war and intercollegiate
athletics" - when ringers, proselyting, slugging,
greased footballs, brass knuckles were as common
accompaniments of college sport as clean, hard
playing and inter-university friendliness 'are today.
The old has passed from us, and there has been n
stauncher backer of aboveboard athletics in the new
era of sportsmanship than the University of Michi-
gan. That anyone in the least acquainted with the
brand of play Maize and Blue coaches have drilled
into their men should cast suspicions upon the good
name of a Michigan basketball team and its mentor
seemed unbelievable until the Chicago Tribune, in
its "Wake of the News", appeared Wednesday with
a letter from W. G. Erdman, president of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin club of Detroit, charging that
"Coach Mather in his anxiety to keep the lead per-
mitted his men to have their shoulders greased so
as to make. them hard to 'hold' when guarded by
the Wisconsin team."
The man who made this charge and placed it be-
fore the million or so readers of the Tribune did so
very evidently without the least inquiry, with no
desire except to take his own snap judgment as a
means of hurting the University of Michigan in the
eyes of all true sportsmen in America. If he had
taken the trouble to ask the members of the Wis-
consin team, the Wisconsin coach, or the umpires
at the game he could have found how baseless his
clprge was; for the fact was brought out at the
time, and accepted absolutely, that the sole reason
ofr Michigan's oily shoulders was the fact that the
players were in haste to rush to the floor at sound
of the bell, and the rubber had no time to towel off
the liniment which is used between halves, to limber
sore.muscles.
The explanation was printed in full in The Daily.
and again in the editorial columns. The Michigan
athletic -department and coach, to make sure tha
no misunderstanding had been carried away, wrote
to Wisconsin and received replies from Director
Jones and Coach Meanwell that the Badgers had
understood perfectly the reason for the appearance
of the Michigan team and had nothing but the
highest regard for the sportsmanship of Coach
Mather and his men. Michigan, especially jealous
of the good regard in which her teams have always
been held, spared no means to make sure that no
false stories should be spread abroad. It was
thought that the complete understanding had cov-
ered the matter, and that amicable relations which
Michigan hopes never to see broken had been un-
disturbed by such a mere accident. And now, after
everyone connected with the matter has forgotten
it, a person who has made absolutely no investiga-
tion Comes forward to make a mountain of. the
molehill and accuse Michigan, without proof, of
unclean basketball. Happily, the Tribune has given
Michigan a fair chance to reply; and with the pub-
lication of the letters of the two athletic depart-

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
DETROIT MUSIC .CRITIC WIIL
ANALYZE SYMPRONY PROGRAM
A comparative analysis of the num-
bers to be played on the next program
of the Detroit Symphony orchestra
will be given by Hermann Hoexter,
music critic of the Detroit Times, at
4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Pat-
tengill tuditorium.
The talk will be prefaced by a brief-
ly illustrated reference to the seating
of the orchestra and-its leader. As
part of the talk Mr. Hoexter plays the
principal themes and calls attention
to the aims and purposes of the sev-
eral composers.
Creole pralines (original) from New
Orlean's at Tice's Drug Store, 117 So.
Main St.-Adv.
FRESH SHIPMENT.....
WHITE $2.25
SHIRTS APIECE
GEORGE KYER

Mrs. Fox was bragging one day about the
large number of her cubs.
"How many cubs do you bring into the
world at one time?" she asked the LIONESS.
"Only ONE," replied the Lioness-".b t's
a LION."
MURADS COST 20 CENTS for a BOX
of 10-BUT THEY'RE MURADS!
MURADS would be lower priced if we left out all
or part of the 100% Turkish tobaccos of the purest and
best varieties grown-or if we substituted inferior grades
of Turkish tobacco.
But they wouldn't be MURADS-they'd only be
Foxes!
"Judge for Yourself-!"

Special attention is called
toMurad 20s in Tin Boxes

-AM0,104 =tted I

! --

I'

The Telescope

Undoubtedly some of the greatest poetry which
has ever been written has had its inception in grief
struggling for expression. In proof of our con-
tention we print the following from the pen of
Perry Goric, one of the most gifted of the many
students of the Lovell School of Expression:
Poor Jennie Schnell
Her's gone away;
Her would if her could
But her couldn't stay.

'Kirschbaum
:Evening Clothes:
Sp ecial at

'Twas her aching heart
And her baddish cough,
'Twas her two weak lungs
That took her off.
Oh! Be she gone
Or can she went?
Oh, has her left I all alone?
Her can never come to we
We can never go to she,
It cannot was.

WITHOUT THE SLIGHTEST EXAGGERATION,
THESE REMARKABLE VALUES IN KIRSCHBAUM
EVENING CLOTHES ARE A FULL THIRD BELOW
THE PREVAILING RETAIL LEVEL.
FOR IN ORDER TO KEEP THE SKILLED TAIL-
ORS OF THEIR CUSTOM SHOPS BUSY, THE A. B.
KIRSCHBAUM COMPANY ARE SUPPLYING THESE
FULL DRESS AND TUXEDO SUITS TO US WITH-
OUT PROFIT-THE FULL ADVANTAGE OF WHICH
WE ARE PASSING ALONG TO OUR CUSTOMERS.
TAILORED IN FINE UNFINISHED WORSTEDS
-PURE SILK LININGS AND SATIN FACINGS.
SOLD EXCLUSIVELY IN ANN ARBOR BY
__FRED W. GROSS:

0

Dear Noah:
Do you think that I cheapen myself by attending
the musical comedies which come to the Whitney,
in company with a gentleman friend of mine?
Miss Nomur.
Not at all; on the-contrary, you are making your-
self very dear to him.
Yes, Clarice, you are probably right when you
say that a man who has a scolding wife could
rightfully call her the "Crabapple of his eye."
Famous Closing Lines
"Here I am and here I stick," said the woman
to the policeman who was trying to prevent her
from sitting on the newly painted bench.
NOAH COUNT.

_

309 SOUTH MAIN

!ILW

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