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January 19, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-19

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

:6k1 W

' _ .

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER 01?THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the hloard in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS,
The Associated Press is rxclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, g6o; Editorial. 2414.
Comniunications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith. andl notices of events will be piublished in The (Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if !eft at or mailed to The Daily ofice.
Unsigned communications wiil receive no consideration. No man
uscript will be returned unless the writer incoses postage.
TheIDaily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex,
pressed in the communications.
"Whts Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. bROPHY JR
News Editor..............................Chesser M Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adam R. W. Hitchcock
B, P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor...... ............. A. Bernstein
editorials. ............. Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News............ ..................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports.....................................Robert Angell
Women's Editor...............................Mary n Lane
Telegraph.....................................West Gallogly
telescope .. ....... .... ...... ....... ........Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Thomas E Dewey M. A. Klaver
Paul G. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Elizabeth Vickery LenI .Hershddrtie Walter Donnelly
CG E. Clark diugliston McRain Beata Haslev
George Reindel Frank fl. McPike Katfirine Montgomery
Dorothy Monfort J. A. Bacon Gerald P Olverton
-arry B rrundy W. W. Ottaway Edward lambrecht
Frances Oberholtzet Paul Watzel William H Riley It
Robert E. Adams J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett

began, young people out for a good time have
found an added zest in breaking some convenient
rule not regularly enforced; another, that the actual
cases of immorality are small compared to the num-
ber of rule-forgetters; still another, and most ii-
portant of all, that rules broken innumerable times
without any apparent attempt to punish individual
cases or any authority willing or able to take the
responsibility of such punishment, soon lose their
force as compellors of conduct.
Why, instead of cutting off Michigan's oldest
and greatest social event and hurting the good
name of Michigan in newspapers the country wide,
could not the committee have considered human na-
ture and put the thing squarely up to us as a ques-
tion of honor, saying: "You have, for various
reasons, failed to realize that obedience to these
rules is a matter of honor; you will be given your
chance to keep or lose the Hop, and if you fail
there will be no Hop in 1922 ?"
In the future, the accentuation of the honor side
of the Hop, plus the setting up of a student and
faculty committee which will be no shadow, but
deal directly with violations, is feasible and shoul(
by all means he adopted as the basis for a return of
the Hop.
THE CHINESE SPOTLIGHT
The pleasure-seeker and the humanitarian alike
wil be reached by the appeal of tomorrow night's
entertainment in Hill auditorium; for, no matter
how important the phase of aid to the starving
Chinese may appear in the reasons for the produc-
tion, the show will stand on its own feet and would
find a very large audience even if placed purely on
its merits as a money's-worth amusement.
The Chinese Spotlight is a vaudeville production
whose cast has been drawn from the best stage tal-
ent of Michigan, both Oriental and American. A
musical act which will reveal the origin of jazz is
promised, while to the "fussers" upon the campus,
the moon mandolin should offer seductive attrac-
tion. This act, together with four other equally
amusing ones, forms a program which the partici-
pators have labored ha'rd to oring up to a high
standard of art. For this reason the lovers of
pleasure for pleasure's sake will find it to their best
interests to be present at the Zpotlight.
The ears of any to whom the pleasure side offers
insufficient inducement can certainly not remain
deaf to the appeal sent forth by the millions of
starving Chinese whose suffering is aggravated by
the crowded living conditions of their country. It
is for the aleviation of their hunger that the pro-
ceeds derived from the performance will be used.
It is for the preservation of life that the profits
are destined.
Whether from a love of pleasure or because of
the knowledge that the small sum which is required
for the purchase of a ticket will help keep some un-
fortunate free from hunger, or both, Michigan
should fill every seat in the auditorium tomorrow
night.

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
GRAHAM'S
Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12: 10 p.m.

lb

999

TAXI'

999

4
a-

A Dodge Car
audDodge 40
Service
enough said

999

TAXI'

999

JANUARY
S M TW T

2
9
1r,
23
30

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

d
13
20
27

F S
1
7 8
14 1
21 22
28 29

..., ..... W.

9US1NESSS TAFF
Telephone1 960
BUSINESS MANAGER........IEGRAND n. GAINES JR
Advertising...............-..-............ . Joyce
Ulassifieds......................................-Ro-t.- Kerr
Publication ..............................1: M IHIeath
!'accounts ...... ..................................tF_:2l l'riohs
Circulation.-.........V. F. Hilerv
Assistants
R W. Lambrecht P H Hlutchinson N. W. Robertso"
13. G. Gower F. A. Cross. R. [ Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Roht. L. -Davis Thos. L. Rice
L~ester XV Millard M M Moule D) G. 1Slswn
1 T ]Hamel Jr D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

Paronize Daily Advertiers.-Adv. Read The Daily for Campus News.

J J Liaurs .

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all now trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
SUGARBOWL
HOME M11ADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

TYSON

Persons wishing to secure informat ion c, e rning news for any
issue of 'he Daily should see te abtht editor who has full charge
of all news~ to e prited that night.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1921.
Night Editor-T. W. SARGENT, JR.
HONOR AND THE HOP
Can honor be considered apart from time and
place, in as abstract a way as a geometric formula?
The Committee on Student Affairs announced
Saturday in its indictmert of violators of Hop rules
in the past, that it "views their conduct as dishon-
orable and demoralizing to the student body." The
assumption set up against the morals and the honor
of Michigan students was severe enough in itself,
even considering the careful exceptions made of
members of Hop committees and law-abiding Hop-
pers; but when news dispatches had, as is their
wont, forgotten the exceptions and added embell-
ishments of their own, the coast-to-coast opinion of
Michigan took a big drop in the ticker. Was the
committee's statement justified?
Doubtless there are many men who, trained and
bred to listen to the voice of conscience in every
act, really are face to face with the question of
honor or dishonor in everything they do, and guide
their lives accordingly. We may assume that the
members of the Hop committee are such men, or at
least that they hold others to be; for not once, in the
course of their argument do they go deeper than
the bare outer facts and try to guide the remedy
by knowing the cause. The statement that rules
were broken was true, but the students, who live
close to the reasons underlying the unfortunate
events which caused the discontinuation of the Hop
were rightly surprised and disappointed that no
consideration had apparently been given these rea-
sons in the solution of the problem.
Honor doubtless ought to be a thing apart, its
dictates obeyed by all on pain of punishment; just
as human boings doubtless ought to be perfect. But
the first is no more possible in this world than the
second. One and all, with the exception of the
crass materialist, the criminal and the imbecile, we
have come to recognize that honor must prevail as
the rule of our dealings. But every day, either be-
cause we are thick-skinned and through our im-
perfections cannot see that a thing is a question of
honor: or because desires flood over and drown the
voice that warns of wrong; or because timeworn
ideas and rluts of thinking have made us so mud-
dle-headed that we can rush into dishonor without
losing the least self-respect, we break our creed and
can only be broiight to time by having the matter
dut squarely and fairly up to us. Then, because we
drecognize and obey the dictates of right conduct
as coneets we take stock of ourselves and change
our mode of action.
But the Hop committee, seeing things not as
they are but as they would be if perfect. never gave
us this chance. Assuming that all violations of the
Hop rules were direct matters of dishonor, they
passed clean over the essential fact that in most
cases no such broad indictment would be justified
"I never heard that you couldn't smoke cigarettes
in the booths," is one comment that is frequently
heard -- and the fact that a great many neither
read the rules of the Hop nor realized their sig-
nificance is just one of many facts not properly
considered. 'Another is the truth that, since time

G GOLF AND POLO

WHITE OXFORD

SHIRTS

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TVTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded everyl meal
BUT
Roon for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

1921 Spring Price

TINKER

& COMPANY

S. State St. at William St.
All of our stock has been reduced
to meet the new scale of prices

I,

d

-.
a)

hec Telescope

- - -

I

WANTED - Several ambitious students, who
were unexpectedly thrown out of employment, de-
sire something to do. Best of faculty.references.
Call J Hop committee at ooo.
Dear Noah
Why do the telephone companies always have
their wires strung so high above the ground?
Observant.
In order to keep up the conversation, we imagine.

_ _, ..: wh. -_ _ .w _ _ ...

V

D'ja ever go to a basketball game
And sit right next to some bird
Who was fussing a queen
And all night you kept envying the
Lucky stiff? Neither have we.

We Wish to Announce the

Opening of Our

Our Daily Novelette
I

Campus

Branch

Together they sat on the mossy bank of the lit-
tle rivulet. From afar came the sweet guttural
croaking of the crocuses; they watched the little
bullrushes rushing wildly by on their way to the
sea. Spring had indeed come.
IT
Yet as they sat there, side by side, he made no
move to slyly place his arm about her waist. Occa-
sionally she would look up at him, and allow those
beautiful, trusting eyes to rest on him. An un-
quenchable flame of love burned in their depths ;
even he was not blind to it.
III
He wondered if she, too, had guessed his secret;
was aware of the fact that he loved her also. He
looked at her and at the look he saw mirrored in her
eyes, he held out both his arms. Withra bound she
was in' them. Almost roughly he crushed her to
his bosom. Few things are more beautiful in life
than the love of a true man for a good dog.
Our idea of frenzied finance is trying to get
$.io on the dollar in a deal with Doc or Schmuck.
Famous Closing Lines
"A D grading practice," muttered the student as
he saw the prof giving him a low mark.
NOAH COUNT.

at

Nickels Arcade
Formerly Miss Moses Studio

This School is for Semi-Private
Lessons Only

Private and Class Lessons at the Mrain School

Wuerth Arcade

I

SHalseys

Dance Studios

0

WEURTH

ARCADES

NICKELS

J U

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