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January 18, 1921 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Volume I

TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1921.

Number 77.

Changes in Address:
All changes in address should be promptly reported to the secretary,
of the students' School or College, in order that various communications,
including the February grades, may^ be received without delay.
ARTHUR G. HALL, Registrar.
Mental Tests:
All students on probation in the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts are required to present themselves for examination by the Bureau
of Mental Tests and Measurements on Tuesday, Jan. 18, at 4 p. m. in room
C (or B) Law building. This takes precedence over all other engagements.
Others who so desire may secure permission to take these tests at the
same time and place by applying to Professor Whipple.
ARTHUR G. HALL, Registrar.
To the College of Engineering Faculty:m
Dean Cooley has appointed a committee to advise him as to the method
of co-operative rating to be followed this year. Suggestions are solicited
and will be given careful consideration if received promptly.
ALFRED H. WHITE.
Public Lecture:
An illustrated lecture, Four Weeks in Patmos, will be given by George
R. Swain, official photographer of the University Expedition to the Near
East, in the Natural Science auditorium Tuesday, Jan. 18, at 8 o'clock, un-
der the auspices of The Scroll. The public is cordially invited.
ORMA F. BUTLER.
To Students Desiring to Take a Mental Examination:
A mental examination will be given to a group of students in rooms
B and C of the Law building at 4 p. m. Tuesday, Jan. 18, and will be con-
cluded at 4 p. m. Tuesday, Jan. 25. As the requests from students to par-
tic.ipate in this examination have been numerous and as the number of
available seats is limited, students not on the probation list will be per-
mitted to take the examination only when they have arranged with me in
advance. Telephone 1867 or call at 105 Tappan hall.
G. M. WHIPPLE.
Play Production (Public Speaking 14a):
Advanced students wishing permission to elect this course should con-
fer with me not later than Jan. 24. R. D. T. HOLLISTER.
Itesearch Club, U. of M.:
The fourth regular meeting for the academic year 1920-21 will be held
in the Histological Laboratory at 8 p. m. Wednesday, Jan. 19. (The Coun-
cil will meet at 7:30.)
PROGRAM
Prof. H. A. Sanders-A Papyrus Manuscript of the Old Testament.
Prof. B. M. Davis-Malnutrition as a Cause of Irregularities in Mendelian
Segregation.
H. H. BARTLETT, Secretary.
Junior Research Club:
The January meeting will be held this evening at 8 o'clock in room
F, 425 New Science building. Subjects: Adrenal Enlargement in Rab-
bits, by T. L. Squier. The Production of Plantation Rubber, by Carl LaRue.
R. 0. BRIGHAM, Secretary.
Players' Club Members:
The treasurer of the Players' club will be in University Hall Wednesday
afternoon frot1 to 5 o'clock to receive dues and enroll new members. All
applicants and others interested are urged to enroll at this time or come
to make further arrangements. ROBT. B. RITTER,
Treasurer Players' Club.

PREDICTS SUCCESS,
BUDGET DEMANDS
William M. Smith, chairman of the
Michigan public utilities commission,
in his address before the banquet of
the Chamber of Commerce last night,
told of hearing several members of
the legislature who heard President
Burton talk before the budget com-
mittee come out with the statement
that he had been too modest in his
demands. "I don't know just what
your figures are," Mr. Smith conclud-
ed, "but my section of the state has al-
ways been for you."
Mr. Smith traced the history of the
public utilities, showing the abuses
which were found necessary to reg-
ulate through the medium of first the
railway commission in 1907 and later
the public utilities commission, form-
ed in 1919.
"The people of the state of Michigan
pay in tribute to public service cor-
porations 300 millions of dollars every
year. The wealth of the United States
is estimated at 300 billions of dollars,
of which six billions is in the state of
Michigan. One sixth, or one billion
dollars represents the value of the
public utilities properties.
He expressed the belief that it was
the duty of the public utilities com-
mission to see that the public gets
service at cost, which means that the
owners of the utilitiy are entitled to a
high enough rate to provide a fair
wage for their employees, to pay tax-
es, keep the property in best physical
repair for the rendering of efficient
service, allow for depreciation, and
give a reasonable return to the own-
ers of the property.
CHRISTENSON AWAY ON TRIP TO
MAKE SURVEY CARNEGIE FUND
John C. Christenson, assistant sec-
retary and purchasing agent of the
University, left Sunday for Pitts-
burgh, where he will be employed by
the Carnegie Corporation of New
York. He is to make a survey of
the Carnegie Foundation fund.
James R. Angell, '90, who is pres-
ident of the Carnegie Foundation
fund, is a son of the late James B.
Angell, former president of this Uni-
versity.
Mr. Christenson expects to spend
about two weeks in Pittsburgh, after
which he will resume his duties in
Secretary Shirley W. Smith's office.
EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING
FINALS TO BE HELD TONIGHT
Finals in the extemporaneous
speaking contest will be held at 8
o'clock tonight in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall. This is the second contest
of its kind to be held in the Univer-
sity, the first one having been given
last year.
Students who qualified for the fin-
als are as follows: E. Ramsdell, '23,
Simon Shetzer, '21, H. Hertz, '22,
Jeannette Mengers, '23, George E.
Sloan, '23, Nelson Gibbons, '23, G.
M. Lott, '22, Hazel Smith, '21, W.
Hocking, '23, and Donald Shelton,
'21. David Watts, '21, is in charge
of the contest.
DR. McCRACKEN ADDRESSES
COUNTY MEDIC ASSOCIATION
Members of the Washtenaw County
Medical association attending the
banquet given by the organization last
evening were addressed by Dr. J. C.
McCracken, dean of the St. John's
Medicalkschool at Shanghai, China, on
"Physicians' Work in China."

Two delegates and two alternates
were elected to attend the meeting of
the State Medical Association. Dr. U.
J. Wile gave a report on the last
meeting of the state association and
several new members were elected to
the county society.
Vienna Situation on Hair Trigger
Vienna, Jan. 17.-Agitation forfu-
sion with Germany has been marked-
ly recrudescent lately, numerous pub-
lic meetings being held daily. In the
words of an Allied diplomat here, the
situation is on a hair-trigger, and over
all hangs a threat of the workingmen
to take things into their own hands
on Jan. 20.
Even with nightly demonstrations
of all strata of society, order is be-
ing maintained.
January Technic Out This Week
The January issue of the Technic,
which will appear this week, contains
a large number of important special
articles written by prominent men on
present day economic and industrial
problems, affecting the engineer and
his work.
Reapportionment Due to Be Defeatedl

i

PROF. CAMP TO OPEN GRADUATE
LECTURE SERIES THURSDAY
Prof. Carl D. Camp, of the Medical
school, will open the series of lec-
tures given under the auspices of the
Graduate club at 7:30 o'clock Thurs-
day evening in the Natural Science
auditorium. His subject will be,
"Freudism: A critique of Psycho-
analysis." This subject is to be so
treated that it will be of general in-
terest to the University public and
deals with a current problem in the
medical. field. Professor Camp will be
introduced by Dean Alfred H. Lloyd,
of the Graduate school.
Following this lecture, there will be
a series of four more, all given by
prominent University authorities on
subjects that will survey the recent
advances made in the fields of art and
science. Although these lectures are
primarily to interest the graduate stu-
dents in current problems, they are to
be so ha~ndled that they will be of in-
terest to the undergraduate body, said
Dean Lloyd in effect yesterday. These
lectures are also part of the social
plan of the Graduate cluf and as suck
there will be no admission charge.
A. S. M. E. Will Meet Tonight
The students' branch of the A. S.
M. E. will hold an open meeting at
7:15 o'clock Tuesday evening, in the
Natural Science auditorium.
The subject which will be discussed
is "Truck Axles," delivered by Prof.
W. E. Lay, of the mechanical ┬░engin-
eering department. A moving picture
film, prepared by a large gear man-
ufacturing concern, will present every
phase in the process of making intern-
al, gear axles.
No Coal Shortage This Year
The coal situation at the heating
plant is not a serious one. The build-
ing$ and grounds department is very
well pleased with the supply that is
daily delivered at the plant. There
seem to be no indications of any short-
age such as the one experienced last
winter.

DROUGHTS CAUSE
CHINESE FAMINE
"I know of the prowess and high
standing of Michigan in athletics in
1900," said Dr. Joseph C. McCracken,,
who will speak at the All-athletic1
banquet tonight and in Hill auditor-
ium tomorrow night, "but since it
takes until after New Year's to get
reports to China of the Thanksgiving
games it is quite hard to keep up
with the sports in this country."
Renowned Athlete
Dr. McCracken was a member of
Pennsylvania's Olympic team that
traveled -to Parts with the Michigan
team in 1900, and also played in the
l Michigan-Pennsylvania football game
that same year. "We just won that.
game by the sxin of our teeth," said
the dotcor. "That was when Yost had
only coached Michigan for one or two
games, and all I can say is that he
was "some coach.'
When asked about Chinese stu-
dents coming to this country to
study, Dr. McCracken said, "The $20,-
000,000 which Roosevelt returned to
China from the Boxer uprising and is
now being used for Chinese scholar-
ships in this country was wisely in-
vested. The students go back to
China and make improvements, such
as building railroads, for which they
order materials from the United States
and thus stimulate a profitable trade.''
Droughts Cause Famine
Speaking of the famine in China,
the Olympic star said that it is not
due to floods as is usual every few
years, but to droughts. This is the
first time in 40 years that a famine
has occurred in this manner. Early
in 1919 the famine developed in an
area of 5,000 square miles and af-
fected 4,000,000 people, but the area
and the number of people affected in-
creased until now there are 20,000,000
starving people in an area of 40,000
square miles.

TICKETS FOR HOPPE MATCH
TO BE STILL ON SALE TODAY
(Continued from Page Three)
with Peterson has run out on the
average in four or five innings. Pet-
erson has not been able to give the
champion a close match in this par-
ticular game.
In their exhibitions in Ann Arbor,
Peterson will first deliver a short lec-
ture on the game of which he is con-
sidered the best living authority. His
talk is very instructive and greatly
aids in appreciating the finer points
of the game. Following the talk, Pet-
erson will engage Hoppe in a 250
point balk line match. In closing Pet-
erson will display a number of his
fancy shots which have been a great
source of wonder and amusement to
spectators in Detroit and throughout
the country.
Matches will commence at 3 o'clock
in the afternoon and 8 o'clock in the
evening.
FORMER WOMAN STUDENT IS
HELD FOR OPIUM SMOKING
According to a statement made by
Dean Myra B. Jordan, Bonnie Wind
who was arrested in New York, charg-
led with opium smoking, must be Bon-
nie Windsor, who entered the Univer-
sity last October.
Due - to an illness which resulted
in two operations, she attended class-
es but two weeks, leaving Ann Arbor
about Dec. 16, accompanied by her
mother, who had been here during her
daughter's illness.
When Miss Windsor first came she
registered at the Allenel hotel and
later took a suite of roons at 203
South Thayer street. Her home is in
East Amhurst, Long Island, New
York, where she resides with ker
mother, Mrs. Jane Karwin.
Miss Windsor is held under $300
bail. She declares this is her first
offense as an opium smoker.
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buvers.-Adv.

4

'U _

d

Laundry. Cases
CORDS OF THEM ENOUGH FOR EVERYONE
Price $2.00
U NIVERSITY
VVAH RCSBOOKSTORES

i t

t J

i

WHAT'S GOING ON
TUESDAY
4:00-Freshman fits meet in Univer-

club at Lane hall.
7:45-Glee and Mandolin club
business meeting, Union.
8:00-Research club meets in- th
tological laboratory.

TARST

holds
e His-

11

TVTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded everyl, meal
BUT
Room for All Out
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

U

SUGAR BOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHIT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

Home of Sweet and Purity
Always Fresh

THURSDAY
7:30 Meeting of Pi Delta
the Union.

Epsilon'atI

sity hall.
4:00-Alpha Nu basketball
Waterman gymnasium.
6:00-All-athletic banquet,
7:15-A. . E. E. meets in
Engineering building.
business and a pre-trip

302 S. Main

Phone 474-W

tryouts at
Union.
room 273,
Important
talk on

' f
..

"Telephones and Telephone Ex-
changes."
7:15-Adelphi House of Representa-
tives meets in University hall.
7:16--Mt. Clemens club meets at the
Union..
7:30-R. 0. T. C. club meets in room
302, Union.
7:30-Meeting of Culver club in room
325, Union. All old Culver men are
asked to be present. -
8:00-Junior Research club meets in
room F 426, Natural Science build-
ing.
8:00-Workshop dancing class meets
in the Workshop.
8:00-Complimentary illustrated lec-
ture, "Four Weeks on the Isle of
Patmos," by George R. Swain, of the
Latin department, in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium, under the auspices
of the Scroll.

U-NOTICES
Tryouts for the Union opera should
see Mr. Shuter in room 308 of the
Union, from 10:30 to 12 or from
2:30 to 4:30 o'clock any week day,
except Saturday.
MANY ROOMING GRIEVANCES
BEFORE HOUSING COMMITTEE
Although the number of students
who desire to change their rooms at
the end of the semester is large, the
University housing bureau is having
no particular difficulty in disposing
of them, according to Prof. J. A. Burs-
ley, director of the bureau.
Students who have not mutual
agreements with their landladies are
required to obtain the consent of the
bureau before they can leave their
rooms, as it has been ruled that the
rooms are contracted for a year, not
for one semester. As many stu-
dents did not understand this when
they took the rooms, there has been
a good deal of confusion, which the,
recent ruling of the bureau has accen-
tuated.
Search for Missing Seaplane
Panama, Jan. 17.-The United States
cruiser Birmingham with 18 torpedo
boat destroyers is searching off the
Costa Rican coast for the missing Am-
erican seaplane NC 6. The plane was
among those participating in the
flight from San Diego, Calif., to the
canal zone.
Five men constituting the crew of
the naval plane, NC 6, are on board
the tender Munford.

f I :. ul tnn ttttatt HI t tlul H t t n lllul tnu11 1unl IIlll illuu itlutltltlN lltltni l l IlI HHIIIIIIIll lul tu H I I ill
JanuarySae!
SPECIAL PRICES ON EVERYTHING
22-26S.Drling Q . Malleaux
224-226 S. Sae 7 Nickels Arcade
tlll~ lliltlllinillMitnl IIHttN t1tttllt111lllllt111tlllltn llli lllti tilt1111tln tltlttlittlnl Hlttl nlltl.

PHONE 166
TRUBE Y
218 SOUTH MAIN
QUALITY ICE CREAM
Caters to Fraternities, and
Sororities

r I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 18G9
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources ..........$5,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

Ready to Serve
AT ANY TM
Open from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of rice
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
35 CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Style
Short Orders
Quani Tunif Lo
613 Liberty St Z.

I

I

WEDNESDAY
8:30-Regular meeting of the Matinee
Musicale in the assembly hall, Un-
ion.
4:15-Public recital by advanced stu.
dents of the piano and voice de-
partments of the School of Music.
5:00-Meeting of senior engineer class
officers and the assembly committee
in Professor Higbie's office.
7:00--World Service forum, Hill audi-
torium.
7 :00-Canadian club meets in room
302, Union.
7:15--Intercollegiate Zionist society
meets in Lane hall.
7:15-Freshman Glee club rehearsal
in the reading room of the Union.
7:15-Boxing club meets in room 306,
Union.
7:30-Meeting of Kalamazoo Normal

_1 11 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 11 11 11tHI =111111
The Scroll announces:
An illustrated lecture to be give
R. Swam, on the subject --"Fo
Isle of Patmos." The slides to b
from the photographs taken by
was the official photographer o
to the Near-East.
At Eight O'clock, Tuesday Evening, Natu
ADMISSION FREE
, 1l Hl111111 l#ll1111il l111111111l111!llU111Ull11111p1l1!l11111!lllllll

n by Mr. George
ur Weeks on the
)e used are made
Mr. Swain, who
f the expedition

0

'24 Rhetoric Students
Freshmen rhetoric
prising the sections
Crocker, will give a
hall next Friday nigl

Washington, Jan. 17.- Lines were
to Give Dance sharply drawn tonight for a fight to-
students com- morrow to defeat the reapportion-
under Lionel ment bill, which will increase the
dance at Harris membership of the house of represen-
ht. tatives from 435 to 483.

ral Science Auditorium
The Public is Cordially Invited.

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