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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 16, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-16

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THE - MiCHI AN DAILY

SUNDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,

SUNDAY FEATURE SECTION
Published every Sunday as a supplement to,
the regular news section of The Michigan
Daily.
Contributions must be in the hands of the
editor by Wednesday previous to the date of
desired publication.J
All communications or contributions must{
be signed as an indication of good faith.
Sunday Editor....Joseph A. Bernstein

_ _
r

The building will take care of 1,000
people And 1,000,000 volumes of books
at one time. Provision was made for
enlarging the stacks so that twice the
present number of books can be taken
care of. The outside dimensions are
177 feet wide by 200 feet long. The
sides are the modern loft type and the
front is an academic adoption of the
same. The plaques on the front of
the building represent the various
branches of learning represented
within.
,Special features in the construction

Howe and

i

eyes he calls the book "The Forerun-
ner," hinting that the future will prove'
him right. He thereby assumes the
air of a clairvoyant and becomes a'
poseur for old maids, spiritualists and

Ibsen clubs. The illustrations in both Day and Evening classes are being
books are novel, and considering this organized at The School of Short-
fact, are surprisingly good. They are hand. Classes in shorthand, type-
reproduced from drawings by Gibran writing, bookkeeping and penmanship.
himself. Enroll at once. 711 N. Univ. Ave.-Adv.

Assistants
. P. Lovejoy Thomas T. Adams
W. W. Ottaway Byron Darnton
Literary Editor............Stewart T. Beach
Theatres.... ........... dwin R. Miess
General Library
Completes First
Year of Service
(By William H. Riley)
Michigan's new General Library has
just passed its first anniversary of
use. It was formally opened and dedi-
cated Jan. 7, 1920.
Conceded by impartial eastern au-
thorities to be the best university li-
brary in the country, it is a monument
to the men who designed it and made
its erection possible. Built at a cost
per cubic foot equal to that of a mod-
ern factory building it embodies the
most ideas known to the architectural
world and devised by a corps of sci-
entific experts. Special stress was laid
on the fireproof and lighting features.

are the special Tennessee marble
panelling, the flecked cork floorings,
which was brought from Spain, the
high vaulted ceiling in the second floor
reading room, and the indirect light-
ing sysfem in the same, which consists
of lamps placed just over the book-
cases and 10 feet from the floor. The
woodwork was finished in greyish
green color according to specifications
of Prof. J. F. Shepard of the psych-
ology department.
Such necessary library parapher-
nalia as card catalogues, book stacks
and automatic book carriers are pro-
vided for and are of the latest type.
Works of Artists
The mural decorations on the walls
of the first floor were done by Thomas
di Lorenzo, an American of Italian de-
scent. The paintings at each end of
the main reading room were done by
Gari Melchers, one being the "Arts of
Peace" and the other, "Arts of War."
They were exhibited at the Chicago
World's Fair and were later secured
by the Field museum in Chicago, but
were later secured by the University
and hung in University hall for a long
time.

Gibran
(By G. D. E.)
A little late in getting at it, perhaps
(the book was published over a year
ago), but nevertheless I spent an
evening reading "Ventures in Common I
Sense," by E. W. Howe (Knopf), and1
found it, excepting for a half dozen
paragraphs or so, a -mess of balder-!
dash and platitudes.
However, I felt compensated for
buying the volume; it has a lengthy
introduction by H. L. Mencken. Any
paragraph of the introduction is worth
any ten of Howe's aphorisms.
Why Mencken lauds Howe is more
than I can see. It must be admitted
that Mencken is a very superior critic,
probably the best this country has
ever known, and it must be further l
admitted that Mencken means what he
writes. My conclusion, therefore, is
that Mr Mencken is honestly mistaken,
or that I am, which latter is entirely
possible.
I see nothing in this book of Howe's
except a mild, grandfatherly cynicism,
half bold, half fearful. Now and then,
among the aphorisms, a sparkle of
whole truth; now and then, a flash of
Friedrich Nietzsche. But these gleams
of "common sense" are few and far
between. The book is well named,
"Ventures in Common Sense." Most
of them were failures.
"The Madman," by Kahlil Gibran,
republished in 1920 (also Knopf), is
the best thing of its kind I have ever
read; the rarest of allegories; ironic,
splendid fables illustrating illusions,
illustrating, in consequence, truth.
They are more poignant far than any
of the parables of Christ.
"The Forerunner," by the same au-
thor, is a mixture of excellence and
tosh, mostly tosh. In the former book
Kahlil Gibran calls himself "The Mad-
man" because the doltish masses can-
not understand his truths; in the sec-
ond book no one can possibly under-
stand, half of the time, whither he is
drifting. To pull the wool over all

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-ii

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The place for Genuine Victrofas and all Musical Instruments

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