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January 16, 1921 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-16

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ASSOCIATED
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DAY AND NIGHIT NIRE
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VOL. XXXI. No. 76. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

VARSITY LOSES TO
BUCKEYE TEAM BY
SCORE Of 22-10

BISHOP MCDOWELL, FAMOUS SPEAKER AND U ""
WRITER, TALKS AT SERVICES TONIGHTi
1rini AiiTinhifl nr

KARPUS ONLY WOLVERINE
FIND BASKET FOR
COUNTERS

TOI

THIRD DEFEAT HANDED
MICHIGAN BASKETEERS
Ohio State, Fighting Game Bitterly,
Shows Flashes of
Speed
Ohio State's close defensive play
and fitful offensive team work, cou-
pled with Michigan's inability to lo-
cate the basket, cost the Wolverines
last night their third Conference
game, 22 to 10. Only once did a Michi-
gan forward make a field goal and
that when Karpus dropped in a mod-
erately long shot during the second
half.j
Early in the game the contest turn-
ed into a bitterly fought battle with
numerous personal fouls called on
men of both sides and general hard
playing throughout. Michigan's quin-
tet fought the Ohio five evenly, but
the Wolverines were unable to offset
with baskets the Buckeye scoring, due
to flashing bits of team play.
Rea Injured
Not one field goal was counted by
Michigan in the first period, Karpus
being the-sole scorer with three free
throws. The playing in this half was
hard, and featured by the numerous
shots at the basket which the Wol-
verines took, only to miss them. Rea
had to be taken out of the contest
towards the end of the half, when he
injured his ankle, Wilson being sub-
stituted.
Michigan's five started the second
half auspiciously, but they failed to
keep up with the Ohio scoring ma-
chine. Again Michigan's inability to
find the basket was clearly evident.
On the other hand, Ohio State broke
loose from the tip off on numerous
occasions, and by clever passing drop-
ped in short shots which soon put
them in a commanding position from
which Michigan never threatened to
dislodge them.
(Continued on Page Eight)
DISLIKES ACUSAIONS
STUDENT BELIEVES REMARK
MADE BY COMMITTEE TO BE
UNCALLED FOR
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
As a representative of the self-re-
specting fraternity men of the Uni
versity of Michigan, I can not but take
offense at the widely published state-
ments of the senate committee on stu-
dent affairs, on the J-Hop question.
The action of the committee, I will
not question. However, the personal
general insinuations are over bold and
to a certain extent vicious in their
possible meaning to many like myself.
I am awfully aware of most of the
"out of the way doings" of some fra-
ternity men. The number of these af-
fairs and the number of men involved
making reasonable and justifiable al-
lowances for general conditions and
the inevitable, has been remarkably
small and at least not representative.
I attended the University for two
years before the war and now for two
years after the war and in comparison
I believe the latter period conditions
to be far advanced over the former
and calling for no such unnecessary
accusations.
In a very clear sense the personal
statements of Professor Strauss seem
to be a gross insult to every fraternity
organization and fraternity men on
the campus and a serious reflection
upon his family as well. This means
something to me as it does to others.
The statements of Professor Strauss
are now widely published in sur-
rounding states where they will reach

and make many a mother extremely
uneasy. I have doubts as to the justi-
fleation of Professor Strauss' policy
and believe it to be detrimental in the
extreme.
If the students of this University
were exactly in a civilian life position,
his personal insinuations and accusa-
tions would probably require consider-
able retraction or explanation to gen-

"A Man's Interpretation of His Own
Life," is the subject on which Bishop
William F. McDowell, of Washington,
D. C., will speak at the University ser-
vices tonight at 7 o'clock in Hill au-
ditorium.
Bishop McDowell, famous as a
speaker and writer, has been secured
by the Students' Christian association,
committee on University services toI
talk here on his speaking trip through
the middle west. Those in charge at-
tribute brilliant speaking ability to
the bishop and state that his address
will be of intense interest to Univer-
sitty students.
Dr. McCracken to Lead Prayer
Dr. J. C. McCracken, dean of the
Medical school at St. John's universi-
ty in Shanghai; China, who is to be the
speaker at the All-athletic banquet
Tuesday night, will give the prayer
and scripture reading at the services.
Paul W. Eaton, '21, will preside.
Music for the occasion will consist
of a baritone solo by Frank L. Thom-
as, of the University School of Music,
organ prelude and postlude, and two
hymns. Earl V. Moore, of the School
of Music, will be at the organ.
Bishop Will Meet Students
All students interested in the min-

I _

istry as a profession have been invited
to meet Bishop McDowell immediately
after the services in the Upper room at
Lane hall. A short meeting and mixer
will be held and the opportunity to
talk with the bishop will be offered to
everyone.
Lane hall officials have planned this
meeting with the object of getting in
touch with the numerous men on the
campus who are considering the min-
istry as a "profession. Clubs of these
men have been formed at the majority
of the eastern schools and some of the
middle west institutions, it is said,
and it is with such an object that this
meeting is to be held.
The program for the services to-
night is as follows:
Organ prelude, "Allegro moderato,"
first movement from Sonata in A
Minor ................... Borowski
Hymn, "St. Gertrude."
Scripture lesson.
Prayer
Baritone solo, "Gloria" .. Buzzi-Peccia
Address, "A Man's Interpretation
of His Own Life"-Bishop McDowell
Hymn, "Evening Praise"
Benediction
Organ postlude, "Allegro com suo-
co," third movement from Sonata
in A Minor ............... Borowski

LA~LIhIV1 y
JUNIOR HOP BAN

ALUMNAE PROPOSE
NEWSBULDING
Council Meeting Passes Resolution
Favoring Million Dollar
Structure
FURTHER ACTION DEPENDENT
UPON MEETING HELD IN JUNE
A resolution favoring the plans for
launching a campaign for $1,000,000
to build a women's building on the
campus was passed at the meeting of
the Alumnae council of the Alumni
association held here yesterday. This
campaign has the backing of the Wom-
en's league, according to a resolution
passed by the board of directors of
that body yesterday morning, of the
President of the University pledged
in his address at the. council meeting,
and of the Regents, assured in a
speech by Regent Junius Beal at the
same time.
Resolution Passed

CONCRETE STADIUM
IMAY NOT BE BUILT
Officials Believe Present Plans Will
Be Insufficient to Meet
Needs of Future
TEMPORARY STANDS WOULD BE
USED FOR NEXT 2 OR 3 YEARS
With the approaching completion of
the plans for constructing a concrete
"U" on the end of the South stand,
at a cost of more than $400,000, doubt
has arisen in the minds of the athletic
officials as to the advisability of
erecting such a structure. A special
meeting of the Board in Control of
Athletics has been called for Satur-
day, Jan. 22, in the Union, for a dis-
cussion of a radical change in the
stadium arrangements.
43,000 Seats Not Enough

AYS OFFENDERS OF LAST YEAR
NOT PUNISHED BECAUSE
WERE NOT KNOWN
ACTION DELAYED THAT
EXPLANATION BE MADE
Luling Against Smoking in Waterman
Gymnasium Made on Account
of Fire Hazard
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, chairman of
,he Senate Committee on Student Af-
.airs, in an interview yesterday after-
ion, elaborated on the reasons given
n his statement which appeared in
esterday morning's issue of The
Daily for the course of action which
he comUgtee pursued in discontinu-
.ng the annual Junior Hop.
"In the first place," said Professor
Strauss, "offenders at the hop proper
ast year were not warned or disci-
lined because, while the fact that
here was misconduct was definitely
known, blame could not be attached
o the specific individuals or groups
t fault.e
"The committee did not announce
hat the banning of the J-hop was
ontemplated until the committee in
charge of the affair this year was
elected because it wished to give the
atter body an opportunity to present
its case for the class of 1922. The
president of the Student council, who
usually attends these meetings was
not present when this question was
brought up before Christmas, so the
campus at large was not informed of
the proposed drastic action."
Professor Strauss stated that the
reason for the Regents' ruling prohib-
iting smoking in Waterman gymna-
stum was one of fire hazard.
The Senate Committee on Student
Affairs is composed of the following
faculty members: Professor Strauss,
chairman, Registrar Arthur G. Hall,
Profs. Fred N. Scott, A. A. Stanley,
Evans Holbrook, Wilbur R. Humph-
reys, John B. Waite, and John C.
Parker, Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, and
Dean Myra B. Jordan.
Members of the committee inter-
viewed declined to make comment up-
on the action taken as it had been
agreed that all statements for publi-
cation should come through Professor
Strauss.
UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA
I S CONCERT TODAY
Sixty musicians, making up the
University Symphony orchestra, will
give a program at 3 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in Hill auditorium. This sea-
son, on account of the wealth of ma-
terial from which Samuel Pierson
Lockwood, the director, has been
able to make selections, an unusual-
ly proficient organization has been as-
sembled.
The orchestra will play "Three
Pieces for the Orchestra, Opus 33," by
Jenson, "Prayer to the Guardian," by
Liszt, and "Symphony Opus 4," in D
major, by Svendson. Variety will be
added to the program by the appear-
ance of Mr. and Mrs. William Wheel-
er, tenor and soprano of the voice fac-
ulty of the University School of Mu-
sic, who will sing a duet from the
first act of "Carmen."
The concert will begin promptly -a
3 o'clocktand the public is requeste
to be seated promptly, since the doo
will be closed during the performanc
of the numbers.
Time of Rabbi's Lecture Changed

The Jewish Students' congregatioi
meeting scheduled for 7 o'clock to
night has been changed to 5 o'cloc'
this afternoon. This will allow every
one to attend the Union services i:
Hill auditorium, as well as as hea
Rabbi Edward L. Israel, of Evansvill(
Ind., speak on the subject of "Dynami
Theology."
THE WEATHER
Probably Snow Flurries and Colder
Fresh Northwest Winds Becoming Ea
and Southeast Today.

138 MEN SIGN FOR
ATHLETIC BANQUET
Arrangements for the All-athletic
banquet, to be given at 6 o'clock Tues-
day night in the Union, are progress-
ing favorably, and so far 138 athletes,
coaches, and managers have signified
their intention of being present. Ac-
commodations may be had for only
180 men.
"There are absolutely no strings
attached to the banquet," said 1. G.
Reimann of the Students Christian
association. "The S. C. A. is giving<
this for the purpose of getting the ath-
letes in the different branches of sport
acquainted witheach other and with
Dr. Joseph C. McCracken, one of the
great athletes of this country."
Dr. McCracken's subject will be
"The Greatest Game in the World."
Other speakers of the evening will be
Prof. William A. Frayer of the his-
tory department and Carl Johnson, '20.
COUNCIL WANTS MATER
Of HOP TO BE DROPPED'
BELIEVES CAMPUS SHOULD SHOW1
GENTLEMANLY SPIRIT ABOUT '
SENATE DECREE
"It is now a definite fact that the I
J-Hop will not be held this year, due
to the action of the Senate Commit-
tee on Student Affairs, the reasons
for which were published yesterday.
The announcement of the committee's
decision was quite a shock and arous-
ed a storm of protest from the stu-
dent body.
"The committee, which was ap-
pointed from the Student council to
investigate the reasons for the ac-
tion, appeared before the chairman of
the Committee on Student Affairs and
presented several seemingly feasible
plans for eliminating the undesirable
feaures of the Hop this year with-
out actually abolishing the one big
social function of the school. Every
effort was made before the proper
University authorities to bring about
a reconsideration of the committee's
decision on the basis of a pledge from
the whole student body to rid the Hop
of all its abuses, but no plan seemed
adequate to take care of the situation
in the eyes of the committee.
"The Student council admits the ex-
istence of certain evils in connection
with the Hop, but does not feel that
the problem was attacked in the right
way, as the council still has confi-
dence in the student body to make the
Hop such a function that It will not
be open to criticism.
"In view of the fact that the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs has taken
this definite action with the sincere
conviction that it is the best thing for
Michigan, the student body should ex-
hibit a gentlemanly spirit in abiding
by the decision of this committee,
even though the decision'is not in ac-
cordance with the general concensus
of opinion. It is the hope of the
council that in the future more con-
sideration will be given to. the stu-
dent viewpoint, but, in this case, since
a final decision has been reached, it
is to the best interests of the Univer-
sity that the matter be dropped from
further discussion, as no good and
much harm would be the result."
THE STUDENT COUNCIL.
LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr., Pres.

CALLING OFF OF
1-HOP PROVO'KES
MANY__OPINIONS
ADMIT THAT AUTHORITY OF COM-
MITTEE ENTIRELY JUST
IFIABLE

SOME SAY METHOD OF
PROCEDURE NOT RIGHT
Reflection on University Caused By
Publicity of Decree, Is Campus
View
Campus opinion, as expressed yes-
terday after the committee on student
affairs had given its reasons for call-
ing off the Junior Hop, was to the ef-
feect that while the committee was
possessed with full authority in the
matter, yet the move was not wholly
necessary. While some expressed
themselves against the method in
which the committee took action, oth-
ers viewed the action not as bad as
the effect which the publicity of the
decree would have.
The following are some of the most
representative of the views, as given
by leading members of the junior
classes and others on the campus:
Paul W. Eaton, '21, president of the
Union, made the following statement:
"To my mind the discontinuance of
such an important student function as
the Junior Hop was determined in a
most undiplomatic and autocratic
manner. Though I agree with the
committee on Student Affairs that the
conditions last year were not all they
should have been, Isincerely doubt if
they warranted its recent decision.
"The evil conditions referred to as
being 'vulgar' are not peculiar to the
University of Michigan but exist to
a worse degree in many other univer-
sities, as well as throughout society,
and discontinuance of the J-Hop will
not change conditions.
"And, finally, I cannot allow to pass
unnoticed the statement that 'Our stu-
dent life is RIDDLED with the vic-
ious type of conduct that ruined the
hop.' I do not believe this is so, and
I regret to see spread through the
country such a reffection, not only
upon the student body, but upon the
University administration as well."
Procedure Unjustifiable
Lester E. Waterbury, '21, manag-
ing editor of the Chimes, expressed
much the same sentiment yesterday
afternoon:
"Although the action of the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs, in the dis-
continuing of the J-Hop, may be jus-
tifiable, the method of procedure in
reaching a decision, by which the
University has been furnished the
worst possible kind of publicity in
newspapers all over the country, was
decidedly unjustified and uncalled
for," said Waterbury. "The idea al-
so of students or any groupof stu-
dents petitioning the legislature, or
any other body, is absolutely child-
ish."
It is Waterbury's opinion that the
authority of the committee is un-
questionable and there is no other al-
ternative than to allow the matter to
stand as it is, as further interference
would only lead to further undesir
able publicity.
Should Accept Decision
Fred J. Petty, '21, president of the
senior lit class, voicing the same sen-
timent that the authority of the com-
mitee was unquestionable, said the
following:
"I believe that conditions have ex-
isted in the past which were unfav-
orable for the University. By the
thoughtless, indiscreet acts of a few,
the majority of those who wish to
attend the Junior Hop, which is
Michigan's only big social function,
are deprived of the opportunity.
"The discontinuing of the J-Hop
without sufficient opportunity for an
alternative plan to' be submitted to
the Committee on Student Affairs,
(Continued on page Eight)

Councilors from 15 groups of alum-
nae throughout the country, with
written endorsement from the Kan-,
sas City and San Diego branches,'
passed the resolution which is as fol-
lows: "Be it resolved that it is the
sense of the Alumnae council of the'
Alumni association of the University
of Michigan that a campaign to raise
$1,000,000 for a women's building be'
launched, and that the executive com-
mittee of the Alumnae council be em-
powered to work out detailed plans
for such a campaign, said plans to be
presented.to the Alumnae meeting in
June."
President Marion L. Burton, in his
address before the meeting, present-
ed the general needs of the Univer-
sity in connection with the proposed,
legislative enactments, and explained
the part the alumnae could take in
social and academic affairs of the
University. He told of the need of the
women's building and the possible
avenues of resources open, stressing
the necessity of earnestness and en-
thusiasm in the attack.
Regents Endorse Plan
Regent Junius Beal, confirming
statements issued last spring, said
that there was no question of the sup-
port of the Board of Regents, and
stated that they were now looking for
a site for such a building. He spoke
of the structure as a solution of not
only a women's problem but a Uni-1
versity problem.
The board of directors of the Wom-
en's league pledged a fund of be-
tween $1,000 and $1,200, which had
been set aside for such a purpose, and
urged the step taken by the council
in their resolution, which follows:
"Resolved--That the Alumnae coun-
cil be urged to consider the advisa-
bility of a campaign for a new wpm-
en's building, and to that end to offer
to this council the money which has
been set aside by the Women's league
and other women's organizations as a
nucleus of a fund to finance such a
campaign."

"This action was made necessary,"
stated Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chair-Z
man of the Board in Control of Ath-
letics, "because of the fact that the
proposed structure would have a ca-
pacity of only 43,000 people and in-
creasing interest in football gives
positive proof that such accommoda-
tions would be entirely inadequate in
a structure of such permanency as a
concrete stadium. At this year's Illi-
nois and Chicago games there were
demands for from 35,000 - to 40,000
seats, which is a clear indication that
it would be impossible to predict the
possible future demand.
"Added to the fact that 43,000 seatsf
would not meet future requirements,"
continued Professor Aigler, "is the
practical impossibility of enlarging
such a structure as was at first pro-
posed. In case this stadium was
erected, the only method of increas-!
ing the capacity would be to close in
the openceastends or to build another.
tier of seats above the stands. Both
these schemes are undesirable.
Plan Temporary Stands
The alternative which has been sug-
gested is to extend the present
north stand and to build at the west
end of Ferry field stands of wood and
steel which would be temporary
structures. The idea is to erect the!
temporary stands of solid construc-
tion which would last for a period of
from two to four years and in the
interim to work out plans for a sta-,
dium which could be enlarged, mak-
ing ample provision for future re-
quirements. Such a stadium would
be bowl shaped, similar to the Yale
bowl, and could be added to as the
needs demanded.
The proposed temporary stands
would have a capacity of 12,000 and
would make available 35,000 seats.
Tihs would enable more than 40,000
people, by reason of standing room
and boxes, to see a game on Ferry
field.
Whatever action is taken by the
board, it is certain,however, that the
seating space of the field will be in-
creased by several thousand next'
year.

2hoard In Control
Donates $1,000
A contribution of $500 for the Eu-
ropean students' relief and $500 for
the European children's relief to be
turned over to the Americanrelief
adminstration, under the direction of
Herbert Hoover, was voted by the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions at its meeting in the Press build-
ing yesterday morning. Any funds
which may be returned to the board=
from its contribution to the Paris
Union will be used to reimburse the
board for this expenditure
The board moved that its former
action in regard to fellowships in jour-
nalism be made to apply to the next
agremic year. It was found that the
establishment of the fellowships had
been made -too late for appointment
to be made this year, and the tw
t fellowships, each for $600, will become
available next year.

-1
:t
e
d
;s
oa
e

A. . E. E. To Discuss Detroit TrI
Members of the A. I. E. E. will met
at 7:16 o'clock Tuesday evening, Jar
18, in room 273, Engineering buildini
Besides important business to be con
sidered, there will be a pre-trip tal
on "Telephones and Telephone Ex
changes," preparatory to an inspectic
excursion to Detroit to examine i
large system of the Bell Telephon
company.

J. CRAMPTON FINN.

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