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January 15, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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H IGHA NGINEERING

STRAUSS GIVES REASONS FOR
DISCONTINUANCE OF J=HOP

AlLY OFFICIALDULLETIN

FELLOWSHIPS' AWARDED

i

I

(Continued from Page One)

I Volume I

SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1921.

Number 75.

Citizens' Banquet:
Members of the Faculty and others wishing to attend the Chamber of
Commerce January Banquet are asked to secure tickets not later than
Saturday evening. The banquet will be held at the Armory Monday, Jan.
17, gt 6:30 p. m. Tickets, $1.00, at Quarry's drug store.
W. E. -FORSYTHE, Committeeman.
Extemporaneous Contest:
The preliminaries will be held at 2 o'clock this afternoon in room
302 Mason hall. Contestants will select their topics from a list to be
posted in 304 Mason hall at 10 this morning. They will draw for places
at 1:45 o'clock this afternoon. DAVID WATTS.

FIVE GRADUATES, ONE A CHINI
APPOINTED FOR RESEARCH
WORK HERE

ESE

A RE

Y OU

ASLEEP?

Try to answer that question.
Not merely from the standpoint of campus activities, studies
and pleasure, but from the broader point of view.
Are Michigan Men thinking? Are they ever serious?
Are they engaging in those little discussions that years ago
made and remade the universe, advanced ideas and exploded
theories? Are they attempting to put into thoughts those inspira-
tions that come from every phase of college life - study and activ-
ities?
If not, why not?
Is the Michigan system faultless? What is wrong? Why aren't
college men thinking like they used to?
AGAIN - WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT ITT
The Michigan Daily is compiling the sentiment of the campus
on the charge, "Michigan is asleep." Discussions are invited from
everyone and anyone connected in any way with the University.
Your name will not be used if you so desire, but all communica-
tions on the subject must be signed as an evidence of good faith.
Address them to the Sunday Editor, Michigan Daily, Ann Ar-
bor. They should not exceed 250 words in length and .should be
mailed not later than Jan. 17, 1921.

Five fellowships in highway engi-
neering and highway transport have
been awarded by the Regents of the
University as follows:
Roy D. Chapin fellow in highway
transport, Herschel C. Smith, Okla-
homa City, Oklahoma, A.B. 1913 and
B.C.E. 1915, University of Michigan.
Mr. Smith is deputy chief engineer
of the Oklahoma state highway de-
partment and investigated highway
transport economics.
RyMichigan Graduates Listed
Roy D. Chapin fellow in highway
engineering-Richard R. Rauver, Lo-
rain, Ohio, A.B. 1917, Oberlin college,
graduate student University of Michi-
gan from Dec., 1919, to March, 1920.
Investigation: Economic aggregates
for cement concrete pavements and
structures.
Detroit Edison fellow in highway
engineering-E. R. Olbrich, assistant
professor of highway engineering in
Oklahoma Agricultural and Me-
chanical college, C.E. 1915, Pennsyl-
vania State college. Professor Olb-
rich has done highway engineering
work in Philadelphia and with the
Southern Railway company. Inves-
tigation: Dust preventatives and sur-
face preservatives of gravel roads.
Chinese Rewarded
Detroit Edison fellow in highway
engineering-Chia T. Yeh, B.S. in C.E.
1916, Government Institute of Tech-
nology, Shanghai, China, M.C.E. 1920,
Cornell university. Mr. Yeh has done
government railroad surveying in
China, and ii 1918 was sent to the
United States by the Chinese govern-
ment to study American practice in
highway engineering and highway
transport. Investigation: Binding
value of Michigan gravels.
National Steel Fabric company fel-
low in highway engineering-Harold
Tuttle Corson, B.S. in C.E. 1918, Uni-
versity of Michigan. Mr. Corson
taught surveying in -the University
and at Camp Davis until last Septem-
ber, doing appraisal work in Ann Ar-
bor since that time. Investigation:
Design of cement concrete pavements
and foundations as structures.

one until we have satisfying evidence
that the student body has reformed its
ways. This is a duty that the Uni-
versity owes to the parents of its stu-
dents, to the people of the state, and
to the cause of education itself. In-
stead of wasting their time in seek-,
ing an immediate restoration of the
Hop, the serious-minded members of
the student body should ponder this
situation. They should reflect upon
the disproportionate attention they
have been devoting to the frivolities
of college life, to the detriment of
their real purpose in attending col-
lege, and they should demand of those

who have made the Hop impossible a
new spirit of loyalty to the best inter-
ests of the University and a sense of
duty and responsibility that is cor-
relative with the enjoyment of its
privileges."
LOUIS A. STRAUSS,
Chairman.
CORRECTION
It was erroneously stated in yester-
day's Daily that Prof. Carl 0. Sauer
would offer two courses in Russian
literature and language during the
Summer session. Prof. Clarence Mead-
er will teach the courses.
Come to Teet's Dining Rooms, 805
E. Huron St. for your Sunday Night
Lunches.--dv

11 Nickels Aroade

i
.

"Excelsior" and "National" Diaries
ALSO THE
Handy Desk Calendar ORNICE 75cts.
V N UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

Law, Medical
and
Dental Books
Bought, Sold or
Exchanged

Blue Books
Typewriting Paper.

Fountain Pens
Metal Pencils

Biddle's Book Store

I

The Prioe You Pay
means little when you consider the HEALTH
INSURANCE you get with milk products from
the Ann Arbor Dairy Everything comes to
you guaranteed to be pure. Tested daily by an
Expert Chemist in our laboratory.
PURE MILK IS THE CHEAPEST
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WHAT'S GOING ON,
SATURDAY
1:00-Senior engineer basketball prac-
tice in Waterman gymnasium.
2:30-Pennsylvania club dance at the
Union.
7:00-Upper Room Bible class meets
in the upper room, Lane hall.
7 :30-egular meeting of the Crafts-
men's club at the Masonic temple.

SUNDAY
3:00-Complimentary concert by the
University Symphony orchestra in
Hill auditorium.
4:30-Dr. J. C. McCracken speaks to
Student volunteers in Lane hall.
6:00-Wesleyan guild meets at the
Methodist church. There will be no
social half-hour because of the Un-
ion services.
U-NOTICES
Contributions to the "College Wits"
contest should be addressed to the
Editor of the Gargoyle, Ann Arbor
Press building, and must be in by
Jan. 31. Color designs must be in
two weeks earlier, however.
Tryouts for the Comedy club will be
held from 9 to 12 o'clock this morn-
ing in University hall.
All sororities that have pot handed in
the list of their members to the
Michiganensian are requested to do
so at once.
Mr. George R. Swain, of the Latin de-
partment, will deliver an illustrated
lecture on "Four Weeks on the Isle
of Patmos," before the Scroll at 8
o'clock Tuesday evening in Natural
Science auditorium. The public is
invited.
Try-outs for the Union opera begin-,
ning Monday, will be conductedj
daily from 10:30 to 12 o'clock and
from 2:30 to 4:30, except Saturday,1
in the office of E. Mortimer Shuter
at the Union.
The Union orchestra will hold an im-j
portant meeting at 8 o'clock Mondayj
evening in the assembly hall of the
Union.-.
Patronize Daily advertisers.-Adv.
Mrs. T. L. Stoddard
Hair Shopt

ADITIAL ISPORTS
BIG PREPARATIONS ARE AFOOT
FOR WILLIE'HOPPE CUE MATCH
(Continued from Page Three)
"prohibition sizzler," "political appe-
tizer," "league of nations baffler," and
"suffrage rage" have been exception-
ally amusing. They prove that he is
thoroughly modern as well as effi-
cient in manipulating the balls.
Peterson is also the most rapid
shot maker in the billiard world.
While in New York several weeks ago,
he is credited with having run off
the astounding total of 1,020 billiards
in 5 minutes. He is further officially
credited with having made 100 points
in 27 seconds, better than three and
almost four billiards in a second.
Will Give Lecture
In the exhibition at the Union
Tuesday. Peterson will first deliver a
short lecture which helps in appreci-
ating the game. He is the recogniz-
ed authority of the game today living.
Following the lecture, he will engage
Hoppe in a game of 250 points at balk"
line. Incidentally that is as close as
he usually comes to the champion.
After the game, Peterson will display
his fancy shots. An entertainment
such as these two men afford is not
often enjoyed in Ann Arbor and a
"word to the wise is sufficient."
THREE OTHER BIG TEN COURT
GAMES TO BE PLAYED TODAY

S. C. A. WILL INSTITUTE
FORUM IDEA WEDNESDA

AY

(Continued from Page One)
ice in China he has had many re-
markable and interesting experiences.
The speaker for February will be
Charles J. Ewald, who has charge of
the Y. M. C. A. work in South Amer-
ica and is well acquainted with all
the South American continent. His
topic will be "Present Day Problems
in South America."
Haas and Eddy Expected
Dr. Cyril Haas will talk on "Post
War Conditions in the Turkish Em-
pire" in March. Dr. Haas had charge
of a hospital in Persia on the line of
the Armenians' flight during the war.
He also had some remarkable experi-
ences with the Turkish government.
Sherwood Eddy, who has studied
moral, religious and social condi-
tions in the Orient, is listed to come
before the Forum in April.

.
i
i

EDITORS MEET TO DISCUSS
TOPIC OF CO-OPERATI(

I
5N

(Continued from Page Three)
fairly good in the early season
games, but are new to Conference
competition.
Minnesota has only the great Ar-
nold Oss, who will undoubtedly start
the game at forward, if his condi-
tion warrants. Aside from this man
the quality of the team is uncertain,
Wisconsin vs. Chicago
Wisconsin, with an even break in
two Conference games, meets Chicago
in the Chicago gym Saturday. With
Wisconin shooting accurately, the
Badgers will be a hard team for any
Conference quintet to stop. The game
opens the Chicago season. Illinois,
boasting a near all-veteran team, and
lacking only Carney, is the Maroon
opponent Jan. 18.
GUNSBERG, PLAYING FINE
BILLIARDS, BEATS ROBBINS

Co-operation between newspapers
of the state and the department of
journalism at the University wasthe
topic of discussion when a committee
of newspapermen, headed by J. A. Ot-
taway, of the Port Huron Times-Her-
ald, met with officials of the University
yesterday afternoon in the Union.
The editors of the state, conferring
with President Marion L. Burton, Dean
John R. Effinger andProfs. F. N. Scott
and John L. Brumm, of the rhetoric
department, made no definite decisions
but rather entertained informal sug-
gestions that were offered.
It was decided to hold another meet-
ing Feb. 25 in Detroit, and to bring
forward there further suggestions for
the co-operation desired.

3
l

..

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Says 2ilety Ilutterfly :--

Artistic Floral
Composition

Requires

/s afr. A tom,

Knowledge of Flowers

WAVAZA

Try Us

Poultry Show on from now until
Saturday evening. Finest in years.
Seybold and Esslinger Bldg. South
Fourth Avenue.-Adv.

Rainwater Shampoos
We do Expert Work
in the Manufacture of
Hair Goods, Switches,
Ear Muffs, Pompadrest

Averaging .32 billiards an inning in
the Union three cushion billiard tourn-
ament, Gunsberg, playing 23, made 23
and in so doing defeated Robbins, play-
ing 25, who made only 22. The rec-
ord made by the winner is an ex-
ceptionally good one and places him
as one of the strongest contenders for
the title. The loser, Robbins, was the
winner in the interfraternity three
cushion championship last year.
The match for this afternoon is
Chon vs. Moreland, and for this eve-
ning Gale vs. Palmer.

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