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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 15, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except ,Monday during the Uiniver
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF.THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
epublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
Mless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of -eveffts will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if :eft at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage:
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the rommunications.
!"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. 'H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor..... ........ .......J. A.hBernstein
E ditorials.........Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News. .....................,..E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports........................................Robert Angell
Women's Editor ............ ..... ......Mary D. Lane
Telegraph ............. .........................West Gallogly
Telescope ................ .....................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klaver
Paul G. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Elizabeth Vickery Leogh.Hersbdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark * Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
George Reindel Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
Dorothy Monfort J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Harry B. Grundy W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
Frances Oberholtzer Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
Robert E. Adams W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
Byron Darnton I.E. Howlett
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising............... ..............D. P. Joyce
%lassifieds..............................---....Robt. O. Kerr
Publication. ......... ...............-F. M. Heath
Accounts ..................................E. R. Priehs
Circulation...... ......................V. F. Hillery
Assistants'
G. W. Lambrecht P.RHutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadtef Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moute D. G. Slawson
J. "J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterwortb R. G. Burcheli

may harbor riches of scientific interest, but i
neither of the Michigan expeditions is so fortu
nate as to make a name for itself because of rare
discoveries, both will at least be of service through
letting the rest of the world know more about the
regions visited.
POLITENESS

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The Chicago Tribune has of late been running a
politeness campaign and giving fifty dollars every
day to persons deemed worthy by the "politeness
reporter". And,. if accounts from visitors to the
Tribune plant are to be accepted, the employes of
this newspaper practice what they preach in the
way of courtesy.
In conducting this campaign the Tribune is aim-
ing at the development of a characteristic which it
would be well for all of us to acquire. But it is
feared that while in college we are inclined to lose
it to a considerable extent. Impoliteness toward
professors in class rooms, occasional lack of con-
sideration for the rights of women, thoughtlessness
of the feelings of others, are faults we are too often
guilty of which will mark us as a bit lacking in
some of the niceties of life.
Politeness is just a habit. As college students,
we ought to acquire it. As has been said time and
again hne of the things a man should learn in the
course of a university career is plain everyday po-
liteness, whether he learns anything else or not. It
is a quality which cannot be gotten from books; its
acquisition requires thought and practice and just
an attempt now apd then to put ourselves in the
other fellow's shoes and try to decide what we
would like to have done under certain circum-
stances. Courtesy is a simple characteristic but
inost surely marks above all others those who have
fully learned its use.

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A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS'
AT
G FHAkM'S
Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and
every two hours to 8:48 p m. Ex-
pressestat 9:48 a. m. and e:ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson--7:50 a. m., .and
12:10 p.m.

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Beautifully hand-tailored garments,
the best fabrics obtainable, the lat-
est young men's models. A com-
plete line of the finest clothing
Ready-to-Wear, in America.

Persons wishing to secure iform'ation concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1921.
Night Editor-JOHN I. DAKIN.
THE BEST SAFE-GUARD
Down Columbus way, at the University of Ohio,
the campus "is all in a stir" about cheating and
"cribbing" during examinations. The matter has
taken such a serious turn that several student mass
meetings have 1een held, addressed by indigant
speakers denouncing the cheaters as blights o the
honor-of Ohio State. The only and most effective
method of remedying this fault, according to sev-
eral emphatic editorials in the Ohio State Lantern,
is for the entire student body to take concerted ac-
tion in immediately reporting anyone caught in a
dishonest act during an examination.
This shows, perhaps, one of the strongest rea-.
sons why, now that the honor system has been
started in the lit school, it should be put through
by the student body. Our best safe-gurd against
such occurrances as are complained of at Columbus
is for the student body, of its own initiative and
volition, to assure the success of the honor system
by unanimous co-operation.
No progressive movement can succeed without
the whole-hearted support of those affected by it.
, The Senior class of the literary department has set
a laudable example by installing the honor system
this semester. It should have all possible encour-
agement in carrying out the test which is to deter-
mine whether or not, in examinations at Michigan
every man is to be his own keeper and guided only
by his honor.
MODERN EXPLORATION
Today there are no new continents or rbutes to
India to be discovered, but the interest in explora-
tion which reached such a height 'at the time of
Columbus is still strong.,
During the coming year at least two expeditions
in which Michigan will have a part will be sent to
remote corners of the earth. One, oganized by the
universities of Michigan, Columbia, and Indiana,
will go to the head-waters of the Amazon in search
of biological specimens: The other, in charge of
Prof.,William H. Hobbs, who is to be financed by
ex-Gov. Chase S. Osborne, will traverse a more ro-
mantic locale; but it also is going for scientific pur-
poses.
Such enterprises as these are typical of th mod-
ern attitude toward geography. The promise of
untold wealth which in former centuries has been
the chief stimulant to interest in unknown lands is
today almost ineffectual. True, some chance of
gaining appreciable wealth in the out of the way
places of the globe still exist, but they are far less
inviting than were those in the days of Cortez, and
people prefer making their way at home to facing
the hardships of the frontier.
As a result, exploration as a source of wealth
has been superseded by exploration as a source or
knowledge, and- to most people foreign lands .and
peoples have become an interest in them-
selves. This interest has undoubtedly been fos-
tered' by well-selected travel movies. That it ex-
ists is shown by the popularity of such publications
as the "National Geographical magazine".
Even what, from a commercial view point, may
now be the most barren parts of the earth

THE TABOOED CITY1
There is a city in our midst, whose beauty em-
bodies all the art and grace of imagination, whose
characters are the ideals of the centuries, whose
civilization is the product of the ages. And yet this
city is forbidden, and those who enter therein are
frowned upon, and are misjudged. Its name is the
City of Literature, and visitors are often called
grinds by those who do not enter its portals.
But to the grind this city offers no attraction, and
seldom does he pass its threshold. Nor does he
mingle with the others who remain without. Rather,
he confines himself to the narrow passages of the
text book path, and his view is shut in by the walls
of poor fellowship and isolation.
Meanwhile the guests in the City of Literature
are surrounded by the beauty, the friendships, the
art the-associations and the glories of every realm
and time. They sip nectar with the Greeks, or
munch Lotus on the banks of the Nile; they urge
chariots in Pompeii, or recline in palanquins at
PeLin; they aid Napoleon at Waterloo, or even don
a gas mask in the Argonne. Theirs is the privi-
lege of a wider vision, of a broader view upon life.
Yet, as they enter the portals, the ones* who stay
without because they do not believe in this wonder
city and would, rather seek amusement elsewhere,
sneer and scoff at them as they pass and try to turn
them from their course by branding them with un-
just names, and telling them that the City of Liter-
ature is tabooed.

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30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look justlike new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. Wedo- only high class
work. Factory lat Store, 617
Packard St. Phqne 1792.

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WAGNER & CO.
STATE STREET-AT HEAD OF LIBERTY
ESTABLISHED 1843

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JANUARY
M- T W T

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TUTTLE'S
LUNCH RO M
Crowded every' meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

II

Our splendid stock of these
high grade suits reduced to
$35.00 $50.00 $65.00

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HIRSH-WICKWIRE
HICKEY-FREEMAN

Re-Adjustment S'ale -
Now Ons
$16.00 Shoes,' now...... $12.80

$15.00 Shoes, now .... .12.00

The call has been issued for 1921 opera try-outs,
to begin next week, 110 different types of men be-
ing required. Get set for Monday, all you Al Jol-
sons, Julien Eltinges, Robert Mantells, and Walter
Hampdens.

"Unbuckled galoshes bar, high
tion," reads Battle Creek headline.
college influence, at least, is making

school gradua-
Apparently one
itself felt.

The Teleope
Dear Noah:
Is it true that the blina can tell color simply by
the sense of touch? Interested.
Yes, there are cases on record where the blind
simply by touching it can tell when a stove is
red -- hot.

They stood upon the dark front porch,
Yet he left her not in haste,
For as the campus clock chimed one
His arm crept 'round a - post.

YOUR FURS
are especially attractive to the
burglar. We can protect you
against loss from baiglary at
home and HOLD UP while
abroad for a comparatively small
premium. Can you afford to take
the chance? We are the largest
writers of Fire, Burglary, and
Tornado Insurance in the City
and shall be pleased to advise you
both as to coverage and rates.

$10.00 Shoes, now .. 8.00
Determined to close out completely all Winter Shoes-
Oxfords and Pumps-for Men and Women.
This cut takes care of three different things:
The Break in Wholesale Prices
Any Further Break that may happen in Spring

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$14.00 Shoes, now ..

11.20

$13.00 Shoes, npw .. .. 10.40

And Our Usual Mid-Winter Reductions

$12.00 Shoes, now .... .

A MOST FAVORABLE CHANCE TO'BUY HIGH GRAPE
SHOES

Her parted, dewy, rose-bud-like lips
Proffered him sweet bliss,
And so in the silence of the night,
They parted with a -- handclasp.
A Short Story
Two men meet at the railroad crossing at mid-
night. One had just qualified for a general mana-
gership of some large- concern, having iust been
graduated from a college business administration
course.
The other man was broke, too.
We wish at this time to stand up in defense of
the School of Music and tell how the music emanat-
ing from there, has often moved us. Yes, sir,
many's the time we were trying to work on that
side of the office nearest it and as soon as the music
struck up moved to the opposite side of the office.
famous Closing Lines
"Giving her a race for her money," he muttered
as he saw the three suitors trying to induce the
heiress to marry.

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BUTLER
INSURANCE

Walk-0
115

ver foot Shop

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9.60

Phone 401 M

09 NAT ONAL BANK BUILDING.

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South Main Street

-,... _
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D re ssje

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We wish to announce the new- line of
Berty' Wales rsses (sow being shlown
IL, uui sturc. Cotaacaid sec thew, today

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3 - -- wrr rj-

The Hutzel Shop

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