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January 14, 1921 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAIL

. ..

,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Volume 1

FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921.

Number 74.

To Graduate Students in History:
At 3 p. m. Friday, Jan. 14, in room 110 Library, Librarian Bishop and
Professor Phillips will discuss the Clements Library of Americana and
the selection from among its books now on exhibition in the main corridor
of the Library in tercentenary celebration of the founding of the Plymouth
Colony. Advanced students in History are invited to attend.
ULRICH B. PHILLIPS,
Professor of American History.
Dramatic Technique (English 22a):
All students who intend to elect English 22a in the second semester
should confer with me not later than Thursday, Jan. 20. Each candidate
for admission to the course must also submit a written statement of his
qualifications.
The number of students in the course will be restricted, and only the
more promising applicants will be admitted. It is unlikely that applica-
tions will be considered after Jan. 20.
JOHN ROBERT MOORE.
Members of Masques:
There will be an important meeting of all members cf Masques Friday at
4 o'clock in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. A. L. MITCHELL.

SUM MERSCHOOLwatching the progress of the drive CLERK OF LOCAL MlERCHiAT
EffEIRS on the campus and will govern their CASHES WORTHLESS CHECKS
contributions by the interest the
EWrin o r campus shows in the work of the Roswell S. Clark, employed since
U S. C. A. The alumni are raising $43,- the opening of school in the store of
-000, the campus $5,000, but the suc- Edwin J. Lohr, 107 S. University
PROF. C. 0. SAUER IN CHARGE OF cess of the alumni drive depends en- avenue, disappeared Saturday with
ADDITIONS TO CURRI(TLU[ tirely on the results here, so we must the contents of Mr. Lohr's safe. Clark
OF SESSION put our drive across. We must do is believed to be headed for New York
our share or the alumni will not see City.
Two courses dealing with the Rus-p any reason for doing theirs.
sian language and literature which' Capons to Meet Ask for the
have been omitted for the last two Captains of all teams will meet at
years will be offered during the Sum- 12:10 o'clock in Lane hall this noon
mer session of this year, according to for luncheon for the final conference
the announceemht of Prof. E. H. of the campaign. Information of the
Kraus, dean of the Summer session. progress of the men of their teams
Both courses are to be given by Iwill be reported and all the loose
Prof. Carl O. Sauer and each is for ends of the work will be gathered to-
two hours credit. The first course is gether for the last day's work. In-
in elementary Russian, and is intend- structions for the closing up of the
ed to make acquainted with the lan- work will be given also. The meet- The Smart Looking, Popular Shoe
guage those students who may later ing will not interfere with 1 o'clock
secure commercial or civil service po- classes. for L.-ZX1

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Patronize Daily advertisers.-Adv.

Li IU

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Sunday Chicken Dinners, 75 cts., at
Teet's Dining Rooms. 805 E. Huron
St.-Adv.

-4" T'ORI the ctud' , t or prof.
zvwuk. 17 hiactz degrees and
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WHAT'S GOING ON
FRIDAY
3:00 - Librarian Bishop addresses
graduate students of history in room
110, Library.
4:00-Important meeting of Masques
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
8:00-James Hamilton Lewis speaks
on "Our Foreign Relations-Yester-
dayand Tomorrow," in Hill audi-
torium.
SATURDAY
1:00-Senior engineer basketball prac-
tice in Waterman gymnasium.
2:30-Pennsylvania club dance at the
Union.
U-NOTICE S
The Michiganensian group picture of
Barristers will be taken at noon
Friday at Spedding's studio.
Contributions to the "College Wits"
contest should be addressed to the
Editor of the Gargoyle, Ann Arbor
Press building, and must be in by
Jan. 31. Color designs must be in
two weeks earlier, however.
Tryouts for the Comedy club will be
held from 9 to 11 o'clock tomor-
row morning in University hall.
There will be a social gathering of St.
Paul's Lutheran students tonight at
the Parish hall, Third and Liberty
streets. Dr. Wenchowski will lec-
ture on "Russia."
All sororities that have not handed in
the list of their members to to the
Michiganensian are requested to do
so at once.
PRESIDENT BURTON SPEAKS
TO MICHIGAN PHYSICIANS

J. C. MC CRACKEN

TO SPEAK

HERE

Dr. Joseph C. McCracken, dean of
the Medical college, in St. Johns uni-
versity at Shanghai, China, and former
Olympic athlete, football star and
track captain, will arrive in Ann Ar-
bor tomorrow to remain until next
Wednesday night.
Dr. McCracken is spending a year
in this country acquainting himself
with the latest methods in medicine
and was inducedmtohcome here for a
few days by L. G. Reimann, '16, of
the Students' Christian association.
Many of the doctor's talks will be
about his work in China. His pro-
gram is as follows:
Saturday, Jan. 15-7 o'clock, Upper
Room Bible class.
Sunday, Jan. 16-12 o'clock, Dr.
Iden's class, Presbyterian church;
4:30 o'clock, Student volunteers, Lane
hall; 5:15 o'clock, High school C. E.,
Presbyterian church; 6:30 o'clock, Jn-
iversity Young People's society, Pres-
byterian church.
Monday, Jan. 17-Talks before med-
ical classes and personal interviews
at Lane hall; 6:00 o'clock, Washten-
Lane. hall; 6:00 o'clock, All-athletic
Union.
Tuesday, Jan. 18-9:45 o'clock in the
morning, High school chapel; 10:30 to
12 o'clock, personal interviews, Lane
hall; 12 o'clock, Betsy Barbour house;
1 to 5 o'clock, personal interviews,
Lane hall; 6:30 o'clock, All-athletic
banquet, Union.
Wednesday, Jan. 19-8:00 o'clock,
Dr. G. Carl Huber's class; 9:30 to
11:30 o'clock, personal interviews,
Lane hall; 12 o'clock, Rotary club
luncheon; 2:30 to 5 o'clock, personal
.interviews, Lane hall; 7:00 o'clock,
World service forum, Hill auditorium.
Arthur F. Heyl, '23M, will have
charge of the interview schedule for1
men and Mrs. T. S. Evans will handlej
the schedule for women.
U.Tof GIv.sym phony
To Give Concert;

sitions in Russia. Dean Kraus be-
lieves there will be excellent oppor-
tunities in that country as soon as
conditions become stabalized, and
with these possibilities in view the
subject is to be taught once more.
The second course, given in Eng-
lish, will deal with Russian literature,.
with special reference to its part in
the economic, political and social de-
velopment of the Russian people, and
its relation to the literature of West-
ern Europe.
A course in Semitics, omitted since
1918, will be given during the sum-
mer by Prof. Leroy Waterman. The
course consists of a historical survey
of the civilization of the Near East
from prehistoric times to 1200 B. C.
Athletics Have
Prominent Place
In New Chimes'
The aviator's eye-view of Ferry
field "U" as the near future will re-
veal it is just the right cover for the
January Chimes,, which went on sale
at the bookstores Thursday. The is-!
sue is one for the athletics fan more
than any other type on the campus,
and hence will probably be read more
widely than its forerunners.
"A Step Toward Greater Michigan,"
detailing the "U" plans and compar-
ing the Michigan stadium-to-be with
its contemporaries and predecessors
as far back as the Roman Circus Max-
imum is an excellent leadoff article.
Others having athletics for their
themes are Coach Farrell's life his-
tory, humorously and justly told, and
"Speed, Accuracy and Wind," a good
"inside" story on Mather and his bas-
ket-shooters.
The sports end is well backed up by!
a varied and complete issue. Uni-
versity women will doubtless recog-
nize in the Jeanette Kiekintveld ar-
tile on "Advertising-a Field for Wom-
en," the same hand as the "Jeanette"
whose signature heads the artistic
"ads" of a large Detroit establishment.
"The Further Adventures of Theo-
phile," by Donal Hamilton Haines,
sixth installment of a series the first
five of which ran in The Outlook, is
up to the standard of the others, and
by far the best piece of humorous writ-
ing which Chimes has had. Theo-
phile and his "Henri of Tin" and Cel-
este are a real creation. Together
with the second part of Laurence La
Tourette Driggs' "Keeping Watch Be-
low," this article splendidly upholds
the quality of Chimes' now regularly
expected professional section.
Roy D. Chapin, president of Hudson
motors, contributes seven good reas-
ons why a college training should aid
success, in his "College Man and a
Business Education" article. "R. V."
comes across with some real thinking
on religion. "Honor Bright," second
prize story, is a good outdoors tale
with the tang of balsam. The poems
editorials, regular departments, and
above all, the makeup, are distinguish-
ed; and another excellent once-over
"From a Grind's Window" winds up
the issue. Incidentally, "Tekel," by
Stella Brunt, has the right touch for
an idea in compact fable form.

i ',

NOTICE! ALL SENIORS
Due to labor conditions affect-
ing our engravers and printers
the final date for taking of Sen-
ior pictures for the Michigan-
ensian IS JANUARY 22. Ar-
range for sittings immediately.
Saturday, January 22 is.the final
date. Don't wait until the last
few days.

AndCLASS ROOM
Ideal, All Round College Shoe
Same High OQality as the
TOM LOGAN GOLF SHOE
If your dealer cannot supply you
write us for catalog and prices
THOMAS H.LOGAN COMPANY
Hudson, Mass.
j Sen forthe Torn Logan Calendar,
I which pictures, suitable for framing,
the International Golf -match between
Ouimet, Ray and Vardon.

Michigan
guits.-Adv.

r RST w

Daily liners bring re-

The Midway at the Poultry Show is
as entertaining as any under the white
light.-Adv.
Poultry fanciers will enjoy the show
now on in the Seybold-Esslinger bldg.
on S. Fourth Ave.-Adv.

Rome of Sweet and Purity
Always Fresh

302 S. Main

Phone 474-W

I"Excelsior and "National" Diaries

ALSO

THE

Handy Desk Calendar oNLY 75cts.
U NIVERSITY
WA SBOSOE

®®
®

OOKSTORES

ni:

CALL US

I

Read The Daily for Campus News.
Paronize Dally Advertiers.-Adv.

Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.

Paronize Daily Advertiers.-Adv. Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.

1

0

1

Any way you look at it - whether from the
standpoint of purity, therefore safety; or from
the standpoint of food value, of genuine good-

FOR

MEATS
LET US FIGURE YOUR BILL

I

ness; you are justified in ordering

THE

o 0

CENTURY MARKET

(Continued from Page One)
cated. He asked what the doctors
were to receive from the patients un-
der the new plan.
President Burton answered: "Noth-
ing." Dr. MacLane: "Things haven't
-changed any."
In closing, Dr. MacLane stated: "If
the University was going into com-
petition with the medical profession
of the state it is going to find a
mighty active competition."
Dr. Hume, of Owosso, a member of
the board of registration, declared
that the state never contemplated its
medical school would do anything ex-
cept carry on education. President
Burton asked him what he would dog
with laws on the statute books requir-
ing them to do so. Dr. Hume answer-
ed that the laws were passed to se-1
cure clinical patients for the school.
"Every town of 25,000 furnishes ad-
equate medical facilities," said Dr. F.
Tibbals, of Detroit. He also declared
that if the state was to compete in
the field of medicine it ought to start
into competition with the other pro-
fessions.
The president of the Wayne Coun-
ty Medical association, Dr. Harold
Wilson, "approved of the plan with
reservations," in his talk.
The meeting was well attended, sev-
eral hundred coming from all parts
of the state. A delegation of over 75
came from Detroit.

213 N. MAIN

ZZ:1

I'

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION LECTURE COURSE

The University Symphony orches-
tra, under the direction of Samuel
Pierson Lockwood, will make its
second appearance for the season in
Hill auditorium Sunday afternoon atl
3 o'clock. Due to the wealth of ma-
terial in the selections for this or-
chestra, an unusually proficient or-
ganization has been assembled.
They will give "Three Pieces for
the Orchestra, Opus 33," by Jenson;
"Prayer to the Guardian," by Liszt;
"Symphony, Opus 4" in D major, by
Svendsen, and will play the accom-
paniment to the duet for the first act
of "Carmen," which will be sung byl
Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler of the voice
faculty of the University School of
Music.
HEALTH SERVICE REPORTS
FEW CASES OF SICKNESS
The Health service reports that
there is an unusually small amount of
illness among students for this time
of year, which may possibly be attrib-
uted to the mild weather during the
past few weeks.1

Ex-Senator

JA

ES

nAMAJ.0

LEWIS

Get your Sunday Chicken Dinner at
Teet's Dining Rooms, 75 cents. 805 E.
Huron.-Adv.
Martha Washington Candies, fresh
every Friday. 90c. Tice's Drug Store,
117 So. Main St.-Adv.
Dance at Packard Saturday night
Jan. 15.--Adv.
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants;
use The Michigan Daily.--Adv.
Patronize Daily advertisers -Adv. ,

No new cases of smallpox were re-
ported Thursday. There are several
cases of whooping cough among res-
idents of Ann Arbor. but none re-
ported among the student body. The
Health service again urges that any
students who have not been vaccinat-
ed for several years or any whose"
vaccination did not "work" to report!
at the office for another inoculation.
Dance at Packard Saturday night.
Jan. 15.-Adv.

S. C. A. DRIVE FUND
SHOWS TOTAL OF $3,323
(Continued from Page One)
and that of Oswald C. Michelmann,
'22, took a close third with $223.
Effort Necessary
"With only one day left to finish
the drive it will take a big effort on
the part of every committeeman to
put it over the $5,000 mark," said
Donald J. Porter, '21, chairman of the
drive, last night. "Many men have
not cleaned up the remaining names
on their lists and it is necessary that
every man on the campus should have
been visited before the end of the
campaign.
"Much more than the amount of
money actually solicited in this drive
is represented by its success, for,
alumni organizations in every big city
in the East and Middle West are

of Illinois

Subject: "Our Foreign Relations---
Yesterday and Tomorrow"

TONIGHT

ADMISSION $1.00

8 o'clock, Sharp

Tickets at Box Ofifce

/' 1

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