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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I k1t, lVIR-flIU.AN UA ~ IL I

TRAM+N tt o everyustom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank }
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .$5,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

TVTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of MJM"

Formerly Pop Bancroft
THE SAME PLACE - THE SAME EATS
Under Student Managemnent
C. G. GRUBAUGH & SON, Prop.
COR. MONROE AND OAKLAND
Phone 2647 J Lunch , Student Supplies
"G. R. Swain returned Sept..25 after a y4ar's absence in Europe
and the Near East where he has been occupied in photographic work
for the University.'
IF IT'S ANYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC

INAUGURAL RITES
ALL IN READINESS
(Continued from Page 1)
The various sessions dealing with
educational problems and issues are
open to all students desiring to attend.
While dismissal of classes next Friday
is left to the discretion of the in-
structor, it was stated that students
who desire to be absent from classes
in order to attend the sessions will be
given an opportunity to do so.
Program Follows
A condensed program for the.three
days follows:
Thursday, Oct. 14
9:30 a. m.-Academic procession.
10:30 a. m.-Inaugural session, Hill
Auditorium.
1. Historical address: Harry B.
Hutchins, LL.D., President
Emeritus of the University.
2. Induction of the President.
Hon. Victor M. Gore, Regent of
the University.
3. Inaugural address: The Func-
tion of the State University,
Marion L. Burton, Ph.D., LL.D.
4. The Functions of the Govern-
ing Board in the Administra-
tion of a University, Hon. Wil-
liam L. Abbott, M.E., trustee,
University of Illinois.
5. The Functions of the Faculty in
theAdministration of a Univer-
sity, Prof. Joseph A. Leighton,
Ph.D., LL.D., Ohio State Uni-
versity.
2:30 p. m.-Session dealing with edu-
cational readjustments.
1. The Integration of the Univer-
sity, Prof. Williston Walker,
Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., provost of
Yale University.
2. Academic Freedom and Social
Responsibility, Robert E. Vin-
son, LL.D., president of the
University of Texas.
3. The Place of the University in
Training for Citizenship, Ros-
coe Pound, Ph.D., LL.D., dean
of the Law School, Harvard
University.
4. The University and Interna-
tional Relationship, Sir Robert
A. Falconer, LL.D., D.Litt.,
G.M.G., president of the Uni-
versity of Toronto.
8:30 p. m.-Reception to delegates,
guests and members of the faculty.
Alumni Memorial Hall.
Friday, Oct. 1N)
10:00 a. m.-Session dealing with ad-
ministrative problems.

1. Growth of the state Universi-
ties, Lotus D, Coffman, Ph.D.,
president of the University of
Minnesota.
2. The Cost of Higher Education
and Its Bearings Upon Taxa-
tion, Samuel P. Capen, Ph.D.,
director of the American Coun-
cil of Education.
3. The Supply 'of Adequately
Trained University Teachers,
Frederick J. E. Woodbridge,
LL.D., dean, Columbia Univer-
sity.
4. The Present Status of Research
in American Universities, Prof.
Vernon L. Kellogg, M.S., secre-
tary of the National Research
Council.
2:30 p. m.-Session dealing with con-
structive measures.
1. The Junior College Movement,
A. Ross Hill, Ph.D., LL.D.,
president of the University of
Missouri.
4 2. Differentiation of the Units of
the Educational System to Meet
the Needs of Varying Types of
Students, Charles A. Prosser,
Ph.D., director, the William
Hood Dunwoody Institute.
3. Co-operation Between Colleges
and Universities, Donald J.
Cowling, Ph.D., LL.D., presi-
dent of Carleton College.
4. Co-operation with the Vital Ac-
tivities of Life, Hon. Frederick
P. Fish, A.B., trustee Massa-
chusetts Institute of, Tech-
nology.
7:30 p. m.-Banquet to delegates, in-
vited guests and members of the
faculty of professional rank. Mich-
igan Union.
A. Lawrence Lowell, Ph.D., LL.D.,
president of Harvard univer-
sity, and other guests will
speak.
Saturday, Oct.19
9:30 a. m.-Meeting of relents of
state universities. Michigan Union.
1. The Salary Problem, Hon.
Charles L. Sommers; A.B., re-
gent of the University of Min-
nesota.
2. Student Fees and Tuition
Charges, Hon. Theodore M.
Hammond, regent of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin.
3. Discussion of problems con-
fronting the governing boards
of universities.
12:30 p. m.-Luncheon for represen-
tative regents of state universities.
Michigan Union.

28 Students Enrolled In Aeronautics
With an enrollment of 28 atudent ,
which is a greater number than in
any previous year, the Department of
Aeronautics headed by Prof. F. W.
Pawlowski, is preparing for much
work during the coming year. The
classes are largely composed of ex-
service men, some who have seen ser-
vice in France.

ASK

Gyn Equipm-ent Increased for CIass
Preparations have been made by
Dr. George A. May, director of Water-
man gymnasium, to accommodate the
increased number of freshmen in the
gymnasium classes, which will start
on the first Monday in November. One
thousand new lockers and several
pieces of equipment have been added
to the gymnasium.

SWAIN-PHONE

2312

rru H~rrrnr ~urs irr lu lrf ri ~ri rilru rrrrrHriif al i IIi mulil ll II11ri i ~l u
Caldns - Fletcher
Drug Co. -
WAKE UP
Our alarm clocks can be
depended upon to wake
you. Prices Reasonable.
I GIVE HER
A box of Whitman's candy. y
No other kind gives so
much pleasure. Half
pound up.
324 So. State St.*
E. and S. University
711 Packard St.
uuurrrlililllurnrsrrlililllwrurnuliirr u u u rarr rrrrul rr~i i aurnu rrrr rarlH

FOR CAREFUL INTELLIGENT DEVELOPING AND PRINTING,
LEAVE YOUR FILMS AT
713 EAST U. AVE., OR AT THE QUARRY DRUG STORE
We Save Your Clothes By Taking Pans

We Wash
In

Sew on Buttons,
and do Reason-
able Mending

Soft

Water

C A L L 16
ONE DAY SERVICE ON REQUEST
White Swan Laundry Company
DETROIT and CATHERINE STS.

a

I

_________________________--___________ i

i

IMP AM
r s

Amp"
1Vlusical

s ociety

Announces

plendfd
,ll oncert

Courses

ill Auditorium

Ann Arbor

Choral Union Series

Oct. 29-Metropolitan Opera Sextette
Giovanni Martinelli and Guiseppe Corallo, Tenors
Nina Morgana and Marie Rappold, Sopranos
Helena Marsh, Contralto
Thomas Chalmers, Bass
Emilio Roxas, Pianist
Nov. 11--Sergei Rachmaninoff, Pianist

Dec. 13-Jan Kuhelik, Violinist
.Jan. 24-Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor"
Feb. 24-Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra
Emil Oberhoffer, Conductor
Mar. 7--Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor
Marcia VanDresser, Soprano
TICKETS: $4:50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.00
(Patrons Tickets: First Choice, $7.00)

Extra Concert Series
Nov. 4-Albert Spalding, Violinist
Nov. 13-United States Marine Band
Capt. W. H. Santelman, Conductor
Arthur Whitcomb, Cornetist
Dec. 2-Percy Grainger, Pianist
Jan. 10-Flonzaley String Quartet
Adolfo Betti, Ist Violin
Alfred Pochon, 2nd Violin
Louis Bailly, Viola
Iwan D'Archambeau, 'Cello
Feb. 28--New York Chamber Music Society
Carolyn Beebe, Director and Pianist
(I1Musicians)
TICKETS: $2.00-$2.50

Public Sale of Choral Union Tickets, Saturday, October 16.
Public Sale of Extra Concert Series Tickets, Monday, November 1.
All mail orders for either course will be filled in advance in order of receipt.

For complete announcement, please address,

CHARLES

A. SINK,

Secretary.

I , I

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