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January 09, 1921 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-09

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RY 9,1921 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THt

« i _.

SUNDAY FEATURE SECTION
Published every Sunday as a supplement to
the regular news section of The Michigan
Daily.
Cantributions must be in the hands of the
editor by Wednesday previous to the date of
desired publication.
All communications or contributions must
be signed as an indication of good faith.
Sunday Editor.... Joseph A. Bernstein
Assistants
E. P. Lovejoy Thomas H. Adams
W. W. Ottaway Byron Darnton
Literary Editor............Stewart T. Beach
Theatres....................Edwin R. Miess
EXECUTIVES SEE
B6YEARAHEAD
FOR UNIVERSITY
(Continued from Page One)
"More than a year ago the University
Spate and the Board of Regents voted'
favorably op the matter, We are work-
ing on the proposition now, and may
make the appointment during the sec-
ond semester.
"The dean of student affairs, accord-
ing to our plan for the office, would
be the advocate of the students, deal-
ing with all their affairs that concern
the University as a whole. In fact,
the dean would take over the duties
.of the present Senate committee on
student affairs," he added.
To Strengthen Faculty
President Burton stated that he
hopes to strengthen the faculty at cer-
tain important points-for example, in
English, Physics, Education, Medicine
and Law. He is especially anxious
to add two good men to the English
department as soon as the funds are
available.
Regarding the influence unstable
business conditions might, have on
University attendance, he remarked
that "as a rule business conditions do

There are two tendencies which ex-
plain this fact. When the country is
prosperous, many students are attract-
ed from school by high salaries, and
there are also more sent to school due
to the general prosperity. When busi-
ness conditions undergo a slump, there
is less demand for worker's and an
increased enrollment in educational
f institutions."
"In general, I look for a rather nor-
mal growth of the University next fall.
I think the industrial research lab-
oratory, recently established under
the direction of Prof. A. E. White, will
show unusual growth and develop-
ment this year," concluded President
Burton.
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the Med-
ical school, says that all he asks of
the new year is funds with which to
provide additional room for his de-
partment. "It is needless to say that
we are very much crowded," he said.
"It has been necessary to turn rooms
formerly used by staff assistants or
for research work into rooms for ele-
mentary instruction. I do not look
for a proportionate enrollment in-
crease next fall, because we cannot
care for more with the equipment we
now have. We are prepared to care
for 120 freshman medical students.
This year we have 180.
Need for Doctors
"Yet there is a crying need all over
the country for more doctors. The
scarcity has never been more felt than
it is today. Many small communities
are without doctors, and the need for
health officers is just as great. The
war has made the people 'understand
as never before the necessity for pre-
ventative medicine as well as curative
medicine."
Dean M. E. Cooley, of the Engineer-
ing college, said he could make no
forecast as to business conditions, or
the way in which such conditions
might react on attendance in his de-
partment. He remarked, however,
that it has been found that when
wages are low and there is a lack of
employment in industrial fields more
men go to school than is prosperous
times.
If there should be a material in-
crease during the year, Dean Cooley
says he does not know how the over-
flow would be taken care of, as all

partment is now crowded to the limit.
Regarding the prospects for the;
Summer Session of 1921, Dean E. H.
Kraus had the following to say: "With
250,000 students enrolled in Summer1
Sessions throughout the United States+
last year, there is a clear indication1
that summer study is being taken very
seriously by teachers and also stu-;
dents in the regular sessions. During;
tb last two years the enrollment in
our Summer Session has increased 71
per cent over the l1w level reached
during the war.
Expects Large Session
"There is every reason to believe
that this year's session will be the
largest by far in the history of the
University, and it ought also to be the1
most successful. The program of
courses which has been arranged is'
very extensive and well balanced. The
instructional staff is the strongest that
has been assembled for summer work
in the University. We are able this
year to offer a most attractive pro-

gram for teachers from Michigan and
adjoining states."
Dean Kraus, who is also temporary
head of the School of Pharmacy, stated
that "there is no question but that the
opportunities in this field are so at-
tractive we are bound to have con-
stantly increasing numbers enter the
school. In order to handle larger
groups, increased facilities will be
necessary, and without them we can-
not efficiently handle a much larger
enrollment."
In the four fields for which the
Pharmacy school prepares students-
retail and manufacturing pharmacy,
food,and drug inspection, and instruc-
tional work-there are demands for
adequately trained men and women
which greatly exceed the supply, ac-
cording to Dean Kraus. This condi-
tion, he believes, will be reflected in
further enrollment increases.
More Architects
That there will be more students of
architecture entering the Universityl

as soon as the downward trend of
prices permits the beginning of build-
ing projects, which have been held
uack for two or three years, is the
belief of Prof. Emil Lorch. "There are
projects reaching into the hundreds
of millions of dollars in architects' of-
flces waiting to go forward," he said.
This situation, added to the fact that
there has always been an underpro-
duction of architects, will result in
even greater enrollment in the archi-
tecture courses, according to Prof.
Lorch.
"We want especially to develop
some of our courses and offer more
advanced work in certain fields this
year," declared Prof. Lorch.
"The architectural staff hopes that
the University may adopt a general
building plan, one that will not only
provide enough space but which will
put the University physically and ar-
tistically on a par with other institu-
tions," said Prof. Lorch. "Our newer
buildings are good ones, but we need

many more of them. I believe well-
designed structures have a distinct ed-
ucational value."
Train For Business
(Continued from Page One)
knowledge of American machinery and.
methods."
All departments in every large uni-
versity of this country have foreign
students, and several besides this Uni-
versity, including Illinois, Purdue,
Wisconsin, Cornell, and Boston Tech,
are working to put these men in engi-
neering following their graduation.
"We should lay stress upon this
work," stated Professor Riggs, "for it
is important for the United States to
get in touch with foreign countries.
We have found the foreigners active
and fine fellows. They are interested
in their work. They will be of great
service to the United States in secur-
ing a foothold in foreign lands and
in aiding their own countries."

A 4

TODAY
MONDAY'
TUESDAY

ONLY

No Adva'nce in

Prices

Girls- 'girls - Girls

.r of
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--. er* -t _. _ _

AL C1RISTIES
6 REEL CONEDY DRAMA
snAUNGro~
ar

noLaneL attenaance cas awnoie.' available space in tne Engineering de-

GARRICK

Matinee Today 50c to $1.00
INights 50c to $2.008
Sat. Matinee 50c to $1.50

' w .

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I

L5TTV

'

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f.!

.,

Leo and J. J. Shubert
Present
A Play of Youth and Laughter

«La I

I ILY

ilu.

-- ------

.....t------- - __

"Not So Long Ago"
EVA LA GALIENNE and
SIDNEY BLACKMER
and Original New York Cast
N E X T W E E K Seats Thursday
MARGUERITE SYLVIA

'V P ER-4'PEC /AL

The Fun Film of

the Year is

In the Dashing Comedy with Music
THE SONG BIRD
By Frederick and Fannie Hatton

So-Long-Letty
Performance
Starting Today
Matinee
1-30 3:00 4:30
Evening 7- 8:30

± ±j.Lvi inr uLtVERL MOROSCO
STAGE PLAY
WITH A CAST WHICH INCLUDES
T. ROY BARNES, GRACE DASMOND
COLLEEN MOORE. WALTER HIERS and
a Host of Tastefully Filled Bathing Suits
The Funniest of Stage Plays Makes
THE FUNNIEST SCREEN PRODUCTION

Say-Hello
When You Say
So-Long-Letty
Special Musical
Score
Arcade Orchestra
C. H. Post
Directing

I

4

SCHUBERT
TROIT

Mat. Today 50c.$1.50
Nights 50c to $2.50
Sat. Mat. 50c to $2.00

Added

Added

---

William

Rock's

Revue

: :
" 0 0"

Sp ecial

:
.

* 0
i "

of 1920

with Billy B. Van, James J. Corbett, William Rock
and Rolls Royce Chorus

Also Fox News and Digest
A Pictorial Journey Through the
Perilous Seas of the Antarctic

NEXT

WEEK

Seats Thursday

7lagnificent Revival of
"FLORODORA"
Superb Cast Headed By
Eleanor Painter
Famous Pretty Maiden Sextette

D OT TON
OALTIIE'WORLD
S'IR ERNEST SHAC(LETONS
T1RILLING ATTEMPT TO
COSS THE SOUTH POLE
ROE RTrON-Co;L4

A Graphic Depiction of a
Desperate Battlefor Life in

the Polar Regions

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00 00, 0 00 @

p.I

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