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January 08, 1921 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-08

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TH

MICHIGAN DAIL I

ILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1921.

Number 69.

llege of Literature, Science, and the Arts:
There will be meeting of the Faculty Monday, Jan. 10, at 4:15 p. m.,
the auditorium of the Natural Science building. The special order is
tributed through the messenger boxes.
ARTHUR G. HALL, Registrar.
Freshmen on the Delinquent List in the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts:
If any delinquent students in the College of Literature, Science, and
Arts care to consult me with reference to their work, I shall be glad to
et them at the following office hours:
Saturday 9 to 12.
Office in room 105, Tappan hall. C. 0. DAVIS,
Adviser to Freshmen.
Dr. G. A. Lindsay will speak at the Physics Colloquim on Monday, Jan.
on the X-Ray Series and the Relation Between Spectral Lines. The meet-
is held at 4:20 o'clock in room 202 Physics building, and everyone inter-
ed is invited. W. F. COLBY.
Lieges of Engineering and Architecture:
There will be a meeting of the Faculty of these Colleges at 4:15 o'clock
Monday, Jan. 10, in room 411, Engineering building.
LOUIS A. HOPKINS, Secretary.

IMPORTNT RESOLUTIONS
PASSBOARD OF EGENTS
(Continued from Page One) 1
1921 were determined as follows: lit-
erary and engineering, $30; general1
medical, $30, nredical clinic, $35; law,
$37.50. These figures represent a
slight increase in fees for all depart-
ments over the fees of last summer,1
which were: literary and engineer-,
ing, $26.50; medical, $21.50; medical,
clinic, $31.50; law, $31.50. These fees
will include all laboratory charges,
except in the chemical, bacteriological1
and hygienic laboratories.
$600 Granted Joint Expedition
Expenditure was authorized of $600
toward the expedition, which is be-
ing organized by Columbia university
to be sent to the headwaters of the
Amazon river. The University of In-
diana will contribute i like amount,
and together they will send one man
on the expedition. All collections of
fishes and amphibians which will be
made are to be divided between the
two institutions.
A former ruling of the Regents re-
garding scholarships for army men.
was revised. At the suggestion of the,
adjutant general of the army, the Re-
gents some time ago provided that the
fees of five students recommended
from the army be remitted on condi-
tion that the men were veterans of
the late war. The ruling was chang-
ed so that the scholarships will be
available to any army men recom-
mended by the adjutant general's de-
partment.
Dean Victor C. Vaughan reported
the gift of $1,000 in government
bonds from the widow of the late
George M. Sternberg, formerly sur-
geon general of the army. The fund
will be used for the presentation each
year of a medal to the student with
the best record in the Medical school.
Dr. C. G. Parnall gave the sum of $100
to be used as a loan fund for student
nurses in the University hospital.
Sum Allotted for Organ Repairs
Purchase of $1,500 worth of equip-
ment for elementary courses in phys-
ics and temporary repairs for thef
Frieze memorial organ in Hill audi-
torium were authorized. A contract
between the University hospital and
the United States Public Health serv-
ice for the care of patients sent to the
hospital by the service was approved.
The degree of Doctor of Dental
Surgery was conferred on John W.
Parsons, John C. Porter, and David T.
Sundstron.
PROFESSOR AIREY TO STUDY
ENGLISH TECHNIC METHODS

News From The Other Colleges

New York University-Students at
the Washington Square College of
New York university have changed
the name of their weekly paper, "The
Washington Square Dealer," to the
"New York University News," with
the purpose of making the publica-
tion not only a School of Commerce
organ but also representative of the
entire university.,
}OnP of the firet s an f ther--

broken for a new Community House
which will contain a ball room, an
auditorium, a canteen, a cafeteria,
barber shops, pressing shops, and rest
rooms. Next year it is planned to build
garages for the convenience of stu-
dents who have cars with them at the
university.
Ohio State--At Ohio State univer-

dents there are 40 who wear the Phi
Beta Kappa key and 11 have their
names in "Who's Who in America."
XcEllven, '23E, to Marry N. Y. Girl
Announcement of the engagement of
Miss Hazel I. Marks, of Palmyra, N.
Y., to Charles W. McEllven, '23E, has
been made by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. William H. Marks. McEllven,
whose home is at Niagara Falls, N.
Y., is a member of Delta Upsilon fra-
ternity.

F

, ,,,,,_

ga
til
so
In
ti4
si
SPI
na
fo
w
sr
th
p1

flfe e9 sLit rir osteps o tr e re-or sity plans are underway for a co-
anized journal was to start agita-spans aoo unde on t c -
on for a student council. It has al- prt 'book store on the campus
becme a member of the Eastern by next semester. Many problems
tercollegiate Newspaper associa- confront the Men's Student council,
ol but committee meetings planned for
on. the near future are expected to bring
W elesley-Three fellowships con- satisfactory results. The books are to
sting of $1,000, $500, and $350, re- be sold at absolute cost in order that
)ectively, are offered by the Alum- the store may be co-operative in
ae association of Wellesley college every sense of the word. The ap-
r the year 1921-22 for graduate pointment of a manager from outside
omen students. Holders of the two the university is advocated to avoid
maller fellowships may, if they do all friction. How to finance the book
eir graduate work at Wellesley, ap- store at the start is the problem con-
y for one of the resident scholar- fronting those in charge.

VENC!S

I

}3 R the Student or Prof.,
r. axe suporb VENC out-
ri'ns . 01for perfect pencil
work. 3M7 -ak degreesdand
3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
t zOFifthAve, 4'
NewYork
b r ,' s' $llr
Phe ~rr

ships of $175 offered by the trustees.
Ohio Wesleyan-An invoice of the
Rice Institute-At Rice Institute, faculty of Ohio Wesleyan shows that
Houston, Tex., ground is soon to be out of 107 who are training the stu-

WHAT'S GOING ON
SATURDAY
:30-Tryouts for the Union orches-
tra and freshman orchestra, all in-
struments, in room 308 of the Un-
ion.
:00-Upper Room Bible class meets
in the upper room, Lane hall.
:30 - Regular business meeting of
the Chinese Students' club in Lane
hail.
:30-Wisconsin-Michigan baskletball
game in Waterman gymnasium.
SUNDAY
):30-Dr. R.X . West, Baptist voca-
tional guidance expert, speaks at the
Baptist church.
:00-Complimentary concert in Hill
auditorium by members of the fac-
ulty of the School of Music.
:00- DiscuNsion group of Chinese
students in club room, Lane hall.?
P. C. Kwok, '21, will lead.
:30-Student volunteers meet in Lane

225; soldiers killed, 53, wounded 118;
civilians killed 43, wounded 103. The
report says that minor outrages are
included.
SUNDAY DAILY SUPPLEMENT
TO PREDICT FOR NEW YEAR
Statements by President Burton and
Deans of Colleges Anticipate
Progress
Featuring an article on "What the
Year 1921 Holds in Store for Us," next
Sunday's Supplement will be devoted
almost entirely to predictions for the
year 1921. The leading story contains
a statement from President Marion L.
Burton outlining the anticipated de-
velopment of the University during
the coming year.
Special prominence in the Presi-
dent's statement is given to new build-
ings. There are also messages from
the deans of the various colleges re-
garding the expected growth in their
respective departments. Among oth-
er articles is a "Business Forecast
for 1921,' 'a story on famous alumni,
and a feature "Vacatiohing in Ann Ar-
bor."
FORD GAINS 325 VOTES ON
NEWBERRY IN SENATE COUNT

"Excelsior" and "National" Diaries
ALSO THE
PRCE
Handy Desk Calendar ORLY 75cts.
U NIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

a-

SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
NorthwestrCor. Main &AHuron
707 North University Ave.

TVTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of t"MAJ"

I ~ I * =

:00-Social half hour at the Method-
ist church.
:30-Wesleyan guild meets with By-
ron Fields as leader. His subject
will be "Speaking of Resolutions."
:30-Dr.. R. M. West speaks at the
Baptist church.
U-NOTICES
[en wishing to try out for the Chinese
Spotlight should hand their names
in at the Union lobby desk, or call
Larry Frost at 976-J.
ontribulions to the "College Wits"
contest should be addressed to the
Editor of the Gargoyle, Ann Arbor
Press building, and must be in by
Jan. 31. Color designs must be in
two weeks earlier, however.
RUMM ADDRESSES EDUCATORS
AND ADVERTISERS AT ST. LOUISi

(Continued from Page One)
more. Having agreed to enter the
race on the expressed condition that
this sum would be expended, the gov-
ernment held that Newberry, Cody,
and King had entered a conspiracy to
defeat the provisions of the statute.
The argument will be resumed on
Monday.
While the fight to determine Sena-
tor Newberry's legal right to his seat
was in progress, the senate privileegs
and elections committee continued
the recount of votes cast in the Mich-
igan contest. Wth 301 of the 2,200
state precincts accounted for, Henry
Ford had made a net gain of 325 over
Mr. Newberry, it was announced to-
night.
S. C. A. WILL ENTERTAIN FAC-
ULTY MEMBERS TUESDAY

Prof. John Airey, superintendent of
the engineering shops, left Jan. 4 for
a two months' trip to England. Dur-
ing. his stay there, Professor Airey
will make a study of the methods prac-
ticed by the Loughborough Technical
college, an institution started during
the war for the purpose of training
factory operators.
The English ministry of munitions
provided funds for the development of
this college, which, as Professor Airey
expressed it, "Removed the barrier
between engineering education and the
commercial world in England." It is
with the purpose of doing similar
work in this country that Professor
Airey is visiting the college.
W. R. BATES, 91M, PUBLIC
WORKER, EDITOR, EXPIRES

s .Michigan Representative
Journalistic Convention Dur-
ing Vacation

At

Prof. John L. Brumm, of the rhe-
>ric department, represented the Uni-
ersity, at the annual convention of
e American Association of Teach-
's of Journalism, which was held at
. Louis, Dec. 28-30.
The convention was addressed by
ewspapermen and instructors of
wrnalism from the various univer-
ties represented. A tour of all the
wspaper plants of the city was alsoJ
ade. Prof. Willard Byer, of the Un-
ersity of Wisconsin, was elected
'esident for the ensuing year, and
rofessor Crawford, of the University
Washington, secretary. The next
nvention will be held at Madison,
is., during the holiday vacation next
ar.

All members of thefaculty are in-
vited to attend a dinner from 6 to 8
o'clock Tuesday night at the Union,h
which is to be tendered them by the
Students' Christian association.
"How Can the Spirit of the Old S.
C. A. Be Expressed Under Present
Reliigous Conditions in Ann Arbor,"
is to be the topic of discussion. Sev-
eral of the faculty men, who were
members of the S. C. A. when they
were students in the University, will
speak.

William R. Bates, '91M, of Flint, is
dead at San Diego, Calif., according
to word received here yesterday. Fol-
lowing his graduation from the Medi-
cal school, he entered newspaper
work and won success in an editorial
capacity. A public worker, he at va-
rious times represented Bay, Arenac
and Genesee counties in the state leg-
islature, and for eight years he was
United States marshal for the east-
ern district of Michigan.
He also practiced law in Detroi'
and Flint. Cardiac asthma was given
as the cause of his death. Funeral
services will be held at Flint.

M
Ne lo
Year s
0
Greetings
A.LUIEBLUTNMAIZE WSWELLS
NICKMS ARCADE PH-ONE 600-M

Opening Makes Commencement Late
Owing to the fact that the Univer-
sity opened unusually late last fall,
Commencement will not be observed
until June 30. This semester's work
began Oct. 5, the latest opening with-
ing the last 20 years.

Professor Brumm also spoke on
kdvertising and Behavior" before the
. Louis Advertisers' club, at their
eeting held Dec. 28 in the Hotel Stat-
r, and addressed a Michigan lunch-
n the following day at the American
tel, telling of the present condition
d activities of the University.

Two Debating Societies Pick Tryouts
Two campus debating societies,
Adelphi and Alpha Nu, choose their
six tryouts for the mid-western de-
bate yesterday. Prof. Ray K. Immel
of tha trfrrA~v~n+«,-.

Disasters on Great Lakes Diminishing
Detroit, Jan. 7. - Marked reduc-
tion in the number of marine disas-
ters on the Great Lakes during the
1920 season, compared with 1919, is
shown in the records of shipping com-
panies here. During 1920 there were
8 vessel losses and 29 lives lost,
against 19 vessel losses and 80 lives
lost the preceding year.

h ILLED, 446 WOUNDED

AN IRELAND DURING 1920
ndon, Jan. 7.--Two hundred sixty-
persons were killed and 446
ded in Ireland in 1920 as a re-
of what was described in an of-
report as "serious outrages."
s do no include 82 civilians who
as a result of the riots in Ulster
June to September.
casualties are, divided as fol-.
Policemen killed 165, wounded

of te oratory department, requests
that names of all other tryouts be in GIRLS ATTENTION! Rainwater
by Saturday night. shampoos, marcel waving, manicur-
ing, face and scalp treatment. Wigs
for rent at Mrs. J. R. Trojanowski's
'1SE Dinner Tonight at the Union 1110 S. University, side entrance.
There will be an informal dinner Phone 696-W.-Adv.
in the Union at 6 o'clock this even-
ing for members of the 1918 engineer- Classes in Shorthand, Typewriting,
ing for.memefer1918ein Bookkeeping and Penmanship .begin
ing class. All members who are in inext Tuesday. School of Shorthand, a
Ann Arbor are asked to attend. 711 N. University.-Adv.
Creole pralines (original) from New H. C. of L. reduced at Chinese Gar-
Orlean's at Tice's Drug Store, 117 So. dens. American management (Char-
Main St.-Adv. ley).-Adv.

{

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