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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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# OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITYi
t ~ - OF MICHIGAN -
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer.
ty year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
edited in this paper and the lqcal news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
es matter..
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
O es: "Ann Arbor Pressbuiding, Maynard Street.
Phsaoes:,Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
Communicatios not to eceed o words, if signed, the i-
tue nrot necessaily to appear n int, but as an evidence of
it.an oties of evnts wil be published in The Daily at th
cretiona oithe Editor, if :eft atos mailed to The Daily office
nsigngd communications will receive no consideration. No man-
cript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ssd in the ommuniations.
"Wgat's Going On'i noties will not be received after 8 o'clock
. the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
ANAGING EDITOR ........-..GEORGE O. .BROPHY JR
ewS Editor,. ..... ..... ......chesser M. Campbell
ight Editors-
T.'H Adams H. W.Iitchcock
B.P. Capbell J E. Mc anis
S, . I. Dakin , T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Editor...................... A. Bernstein
t~rials............. Lee "Toodruff Rbrt Sage, T. J. Whinery
sistant News............ .................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
)orts ,.........................................Robert Angell
omens Editor...............................Mary D. Lane
elegraphW......................................est allogly
lescope.:...........................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants-
i Mine Waldo'- BRyron Darntcz H. E. Howlett
G. Wier Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Kaver
mena Barlow Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
kzabeth.Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer . Walter Donnelly
E. Clark w L. Aimstrong Kern Beata Hasley
eoge Reindel Hughston McBain Kathrine Montgomery
0othy Monfort Frank H. McPike Gerald P. Overton
arri B Grundy S. A. Bacon Edward Lambrecht
iesa Oberholzer W W. Ottaway William H. Rile' Jr.
rb:I ..Adams Paul Watel Sara Waler
aran C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.
BJSI ESS STAFF
Telephone 960
'JSINESS MANAGE1. ...........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Lvertising ....................................D. P. Joyce
Ussifieds......... .........Robt. O. Kerr
lblication............... ., .. . .......-... .F. M. Hleath
ounts............. _.................... .E. R. Prihs
-culation;........ ......................V. F. Hillery
assistants Y
W. .Lambrecht P. i iHutchinson N. V. Robertson
G. Gower - F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
gmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis - Thos. L. Rice'
Ase W illard M M. Moule 1).G. Sawson
* , a a Jr.' D S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
ue of The Daily should see the night editt, who has full charge
all news to be pinted that night.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 1921
Might Editor-T .W. SARGENT, JR.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Ferry field, a tract of thirty-five acres containing
1b-house, stadiut gridiron, baseball diamond,
mis courts and running tracks is the official ath-
ic field of the University, and the Athletic asso-j
.tion has procured thirty-five and seven-tenths
es directly adjoining for futue use.
THE OBSTACLE OF "THE ROPES"
Ignorance of the daily routine in his chosen pro-
sion or business nearly always puts the college
.n just starting out in-the world at a disadvan
e. He usually finds that before being even
rly well prepared for his life work he must take
e more course of.study - a course dealing with
#gs so simple that they are n.ot worth teaching
college, but so .important they are essential to
:cess.- He must "learn the ropes" in whatever
e of activity he has chosen. No text is used in
s course but actual experience, and credits are
t the keys-to advancement.-
1,1s is, of course, less true in the case of the
die, for instance, than the lit; but it applies in
ne measure to men entering almost every occu-
ion. A certain amount of so-called practical
>erience is necessary before the fundamental and
al things learned in college can be made use of.
e business world demands performance and cares
Le for theory for its own sake. I
jowever it is not decreed that the college man
st be handicapped by a lack of knowledge of
rmonpace routine. Before graduation, either
-ing vaca ion or outside oT class, he may, if he
es to, get the practical experience that will cut
a minimum his apprenticeship after graduation.
the man 'who makes a first-hand acquaintance

h the occupation he has chosen by consistently
rking at it during his spare time or vacation will
I that he has supplemented his college education
-he best possible way.
LONGER COURSES
knother impetus to the movement to lengthen
hly specialized courses such as engineering ands
hitecture so as to include more cultural electives
been given by the American Institute of Arch-
ture's endorsement of the five year plan of
ly. This additional support of a schedule which
for some-time been advocated by advanced stu-
ts of education is of special significance as it
ies from men with a primarily practical view-
nt.
;mphasizing thorough vocational training, the
sent system in the professional schools which
uire only four yearsscf study has-the advantage
giving a good technical education in the mini-
in time and with the least expense. But because
professional training itself requires so much
the time-allotted little opportunity is left for
eral studies except through graduate work or
he sacrifice of dropping behind classmates. As
her of these aternatives is very appealing, four
-s is commonly considered as constituting an
:ation and the desired electives usually are
out. -
hrough the addition to the curriculum of longer

I

courses in engineering and similarly situated pro-
fessional schools each entrant will have the bene-
fit of an option between a course which will con-
tain a liberal number of cultural subjects and one
which is shorter and highly specialized. With both
plans presented in more or less detail he can get
an idea of the advantages of each, select the one
which best suits his needs; and follow it throjigh
with his class.

Is-MUAML VAI Y FIAY, JANUARf
ACOMLT LIEO IRE

AND DESK CALENDARS'
AT
G. hED A'O a S
Both- Ends of the Diagonal Walk

CHECKING DISEASE
When the authorities of the University Health
service issue a warring concerning, the general
health of the student body, and urge that precau-
tion be used in preventing illness or checking the
spread of any particular epidemic, it is the duty of
all of us to take notice. The larger part of the
'tudent population during the Christmas vacation
- was widely scattered throughout the United States,
and during this time might easily have contracted
diseases which, unless given- immediate attention,
may prove serious, not to the affected alone, but
also to the entire community.
The physicians of the Health service are well
prepared to care for as many patients as may pre-
sent themselves, and any manifestations of illness
should be immediately reported. The saying that
an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"
is old, but it is always a wise one to follow.
BUSINESS ETHICS
Proposals for the establishment of a Business
Ethics league, having as one of its objects the in-
troduction of courses in business ethics into the
economics curriculum offered by large universities,
seem to have met with some degree of success. Sev-
eral universities have already endorsed the plan.
Any such proposition appears to us to be im-
practicable ande to verge on the ludicrous. Doubt-
less the level of business ethics in this country
should be raised. Honesty is at too low an ebb,
but it is not to be remedied in the scientific atmos-
phere of the classroom. If a higher and more
idealistic code of ethics is to rule business in the
future it will be because the standard of honor
among men has been elevated, and honor is not
the product of lectures and text books.
Every student of economics should know the
objectionable practices prevalent in modern busi-
ness. Instructors should and do point out these
abuses and suzgest remedies for them. But a spe-
cial eburse in business ethics would be looked upon
by students merely as a -means of acquiring easily
a few hours' credit. Right or wrong is a question
that every man can settle in his own conscience.
Fire in University hall would be no joke, say, at
the slow exodus hours of nine or ten in the morn-
ing. There's a double moral: catch the firebug, and
pass the budget.
From the Maj, and Are. attendance Wednesday,
an obsever might assume that the three bolt rule
applied at the movies.
'The Telescope
Gone also where the woodbine twineth and the
cuckoo calleth seem to be Miss McNutt, Perry
Goris and other luminaries who flashed across our
orbit during the course of the late Contest. What
say the howling mob?
A Passing Thought
Gray, massive, sedate, it stands.
Will it never crumble away?
Let us bow our heads in hopeful prayer
U. Hall is a half century old today.
flow to Be the Life of the Party
. LEsSON II
The relation of childhood experiences, especially
those tending to show what a precocious child you
were, will be found especially effective. Thus hav-
ing gained the attention of everybody remark cas-
ually:. f
"As a small boy I had to do all the chores about
the house except bringing in the wood."
If some one registers enough interest to ask-you
why you didn't have to bring in the wood continue
in the same conversational tone of voice:
"You see is wasn't necessary. Poor Dad came
home with a load every night."
From this it is very easy to swing into other
reminscences. Rehearse telling the following one
until you make it sound almost plausible to your

audience:
"When I was seven eyars of age, the teacher
-gave the following problem in school one day, 'If
your father had nine gallons of whisky and he
drank three gallons a month, how long would the
whisky last him?' Unhesitatingly I answered,
'One week.'
"The teacher looked me over very sternly, re-
plying: 'Wrong, it would last him three months. I
can see you don't know arithmetic.'" Pause a
second and then ask, "And what do you think I
said to her?" When those. present have exhausted
-all their guesses, you say:
"And I says to her, 'Well, teacher, maybe I
don't konw arithmetic, but neither do you know
my pa.'
From thence on, if all these instructions have
been carefully mastered, your reputation as a Joe
Miller in cfisguise should be established.
Pamous Closing Lines
"My efforts bear fruit," wheezed the actor asa
rotten egg hit him in the eye.
NOAH COUNT.

_

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express' cars leave for
Detroit at 6;05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. °m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and
every two hours -to 8:48 p. m. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and exery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7: b a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
1 I'My Dairy lunchl
Our food is the best
= Our prices are right
HOURS
7 A.M. TO 1 P. M.
S5 P. M. TO 7 P. M.
SUNDAYS
~8 A.M.TO 7:30 P'M.
512 EAST WILLIAM STREET
= I 11iIIIIO(II(11( 1 111 llll1111111111 1 lll:

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JANIAR{Y

S :

F S

ROSARIES

2

1
2 1V i ,4 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18' 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
'blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

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25% Discount

on all Rosaries this week
Haller&Fuller
State Street Jewelers

I

I-

2%

For OUTSIDE GROUPS,
FLASHLIGHTS and
AMATEUR FINISHINGS, See

SWAI N
713 East Uriversity Avenue

Phone 2312

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999"

TAXI

999

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MISS MOSES
Private Dancing Lessons
BY APPOINTMENT
Phone 1545 W
Read The Daily for Campus News.

a

A Dodge Car
anuDodge
Servicex
enou gh said -

0

999

TAXI

999

as

1

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January

Sa1&

On

FITFORM, SUJTS and

OVERCOATS

33 1-3, Off

33 1-3 Off

Friday morning, January 7th, we will start our January Clearance Sale
of all Suits and Overcoats at One-Third less. Now is a good time to pur-
chase all your requirements for present needs as well as for future require-
ments. Remember, you can purchase merchandise.right now much cheaper
and better merchandise than you will for some time to come. My advice to
you is to buy what you need at ONCE for prices will not be any lower in
the future. All Overcoats for the month of January guaranteed against any

further decline in price.

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V

116 EAST LIBERTY STREET

Corbett"

/

-BETWEEN MAIN AND FOURtH AVENUE

The Young Men's Shop, Where Fitform Ctithes Are SoV

t

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