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January 06, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-06

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0

THE fWEATHER
CLOUD)Y AND) COLD)ER
TODAY

r .5k i t an

4I aitlj

ASSOIATE
PRESS
D)AY AND NiGirr WiRg

VOL. XXXI. No. 67.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1921.

I _ r I

IMMISGTION IS5
VITAL PROBLEM;
OUTCOME DUBIOUS

WALLIS DECLARES EUROPE
LITERALLY MOVING
TO U. S.

IS

COMMISSIONER DESIRES
INSPECTION IN EUROPE
Believes Limited Transportation and
Inceased Examinations Are
Best Protections
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 5.-Testimony by
Commissioner Wallis, of the Ellis Is-
land immigration station, that Europe
was "literally moving to the United
States," and that a flood of aliens was
imminent, still left members of the
senate immigration committee doubt-
ful tonight as to the action upon the
Johnson bill, prohibiting immigration
for one year. Several members frank-
ly .doubt whether any measures to
stop or restrict immigration could be
enacted at this session of congress.
The committee obviously was im-
pressed with Commissioner Wallis'
statement as to the need for inspection
of aliens before leaving Europe and
for more rigid examinations after
their arrival at American ports. . The
commissioner recommende particular-
ly that the facilities be established
overseas for such investigation and
declared that 90 per cent of the im-
migrants arriving under the existing
system would be denied permission to
sail, if they were examined at the
ports of embarkation by American of-
ficials.
"Fortunately," he added, "the steam-
ships of the world can bring only 1,-
300,000 a year to the United States. It
is in the limited transportation fac-
ilities and increased examination that
we will get the best protection."
Three Rhodes
Schplars Now
I nUniversity
Three men holding Rhodes' schol-
arships are now connected with the
University. F. K. Mitchell, an in-
structor in the rhetoric department,
secured his appointment while attend-
ing Millsaps college at Jackson, Miss.,
from which he graduated with an A.B.
degree in 1919. He obtained his Mas-
ter's degree as a graduate student at
Michigan last year. It is Mitchell's
intention to major in English and se-
cure his Ph.D. at Oxford.
A. C. Jacobs, '21, has gone through
high school and college in Ann Ar-
bor. He has taken considerable part
in student activities, was a candidcl
for president of the senior lit class
this year, is a member of the Psi Up-
silon fraternity, and has made an en-
viable record in scholarship. He ex-
pects to study law at Oxford and will
try for the degree of Bachelor of Civil
Law.
J. V. Hopkins, '24M, is the only un-
der-graduate of the group. He come
from the New Mexico Technical col-
lege, where he was granted the
Rhodes' scholarship. He intends t
complete his medical course.
The holders of the scholarships
will leave here .sometime next Sep-
tember and will 'go to New York,
where they will be entertained by the
Harvard club and other organizations
for a week. From there they will g
direct to England.
NOTICE! ALL SENIORS

Due to labor conditions affect-
ing our engravers and printers
the final date for taking of Sen-
ior pictures for the Michigan-
enslan IS JANUARY 22. Ar-
range for sittings immediately.
Saturday, January 22 is the final
date. Don't wait until the last
few days.

DE VALERA WELL,
CONTINUES ACTION
Dublin, Jan. 5. - The Associated
Press correspondent today conversed
with several persons who have seen
and spoken with Emmon DeValera and
he is reported to be in excellent
health, having already held several
conferences with leaders of various
departments of the Sinn Fein govern-
ment. It is expected he soon will is-
sue a message to the American people
followed by a manifesto addressed to
the Irish people.
According to these informants Pro-
fessor DeValera'did not come here on
a peace mission, but because of the
conviction that a situation has arisen
urgently requiring his presence. They
distrust reports that De Valera will
not be arrested and declare that he is
equally "on the run" with the other
leaders.
"JUDGE" TO HOLD SECOND
" COLLEGE WITS" CONTEST
HUMOR MAGAZINE ESTABLISHES
COMPETITION AS ANNUAL
EVENT
The success of the first "College
Wits" number of Judge last March
has caused that publication to make
the "College Wits" number an an-
nual event, and the second number
will be published in March of this
year. Contributions are now being re-
ceived.
The material submitted may con-
sist of poems, little essays, jokes and
other suitable matter, including draw-
ings for the number.
Each contribution accepted must
bear the name, class and college of
the contributor and will be paid for.
The college making the best show-
ing in the number wins the large sil-
ver cup which Cornell won in the first
contest, that cup being subject to
three winnings by a college before it
becomes the permanent property of
the college.
Two individual silver cups are of-
fered in addition, one to go to the ar-
tist whose drawing is considered the
best submitted (including a possible
cover in colors), the other going to
the author of the best bit of text pub-
lished in the number.
All material submitted must be in
before Jan. 31, except color designs.
in all mediums, which must be in two
weeks earlier. Contributions should
be addressed to the "Editor, Gar-
Goyle, University of Michigan, Ann
Arbor, Mich."
MODERN LANGUAGES ASS'N
HOLDS ANNUAL CONVENTION
The main body of the Modern Lan-
guages association of America held its
annual meeting Dec. 28-30 at Vassar
college, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. The Uni-
versity of Michigan was represented
by Prof. M. P. Tilley, of the English
department, Prof. F. N. Scott, former
president of the association, and Mr.
F. W. Peterson, of the rhetoric de-
partment.
For the coming year Prof. W. G.
Howard, of Harvard, was elected
president, and Prof. Carleton Brown,
now of Minnesota but recently called
to Bryn Mawr, was re-elected secre-
tary. The next meeting will be held
at Johns Hopkins university.

Every fourth meeting of the asso-
ciation is a union meeting in which
the main body and the central brane
which met this year at Chicago, unite
their forces. The next union meeting
will be held in 1923 at the University
of Michigan. The association has no
met in Ann Arbor since 1903.
PROF. A. L. CROSS HONORED
BY HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
Prof. Arthur L. Cross, of the his-
tory department, was elected a mem-
ber of the executive council of the
American Historical association,, at
their meeting held recently in Wash-
ington, D. C.
Professor Cross also presided at a
dinner in honor of Professor Chan-
ning, retiring president of the coun-
cil. Prof. E. R. Turner, of the history
department, read a paper on the Sinn
Fein movement in Ireland.

TICKETS LEFT FORI
CONFERENCE GAMES
Demand for Basketball Admissions
Light Throughout First Day
of Distribution
DISPOSITION OF TICKETS
TERMINATES SATURDAY NOON
Ticket distribution for the Confer-
ence basketball games was rather
slow during its first day, as usual the
students failing to call at the booth in,
University hall to secure their paste-
boards.'
Although the Indiana and Ililinois'
games seem to hold preference and to
be the most popular choice, there arej
still a large number of tickets left for
each of the three pairs of contests. It
is strongly urged, however, that stu-
dents exchange their coupons for tick-
ets as early as possible, as the distri-
bution, which is being conducted from1
9 to 12 and 1:30 to 5 o'clock each day
this week, will close Saturday at noon.-
It swas erroneously announced in
The Daily that the Wisconsin gameI
would be held on Jan. 18. ,This con-;
test is scheduled instead for next Sat-
urday evening, Jan. 8.
HOMOEOPATHIC SURGEON
ACCEPTS POST IN EAST

MAY SEE HARDING
ON LEAGUE BEHALF
Members of Council Plan to Present
Need of Organization Before
President-elect
WOULD ATTEMPT TO SMOOTH
OVER OBJECTIONABLE POINTS
Paris, Jan. 5.-Individual members
of the council of the League of Na-
tions are discussing informally the
advisability of sending a special in-
termediary to President-elect Hard-
ing to present the case of the League
of Nations and to urge upon him the
difficulties which European countries
would experience in abandoning the
present league and setting up a new
form of association of nations.
The view is held among some mem-
bers that the solidity of the treaty
of peace itself would be shaken if thf
league pact part of it were abandon-
ed. Confidence was expressed here
that, if a direct discussion eliminated
from the covenant all that is objec-
tionable to the United States, th
President-elect would not insist or
the abandonment of the organization
already at work which is held to b
bound up with so many important Eu
ropean interests.
STAR CAPLAFOUND
TO 0BE OF IANT SIZE

AGAIN ATTEMPT TO
OUST SOCIALISTS
Albany, N. Y., Jan. 5.-For a third
time within a year the state assembly
today was asked to expell the entire
Socialist representation, which this
year includes three members. There
was no debate on the resolution which
was sent to the judiciary committee
by unanimous vote. While some mem-
bers from -upstate appeared deter-
mined to press ouster proceedings it
is generally believed at the capitol
that the resolutions will be allowed
to remain in committee and that the
Socialists will be permitted to re-
claim their seats, throughout the ses-
sion.
IGHIGEXPERIMENTS
MADE By PROFESSORS

LAMON T AND KRESGE CONI
BITE TO UNION CAMPAIGN
FOR FUNDS

TRI-

INCOMPLETE REPORTS
SHOW TOTAL OF $8750
Chairman Ascribes Slow Movement to
Christmas $gason, Business

PRICE FIVE CENTS
TWO SUBSCRIBERS
'AID DRIVE FORH
SWIMMING POOL

i

Apathy

TESTS MADE BY MEWMBERS
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER-

OF

DR. NAYLOR BECOMES
DEPARTMENT IN
HOSPITAL

HEAD
CITY

OF I HAS

DIAMETER 27,000,000 TIMES
GREATER THAN OUR
SUN

Dr. G. Irving Naylor, for eight years
assistant in the surgical department
of the University Homoeopathic hos-
pital, has accepted the position of
chief surgeon in the Johnstown, Pa.,
City hospital.
Dr. Naylor is a Michigan graduate,
having received his degree in 1912.
His resignation was presented to the
Board of Regents in November and
took effect Dec. 1.
The American College of Surgeons
accorded him a place in their ranks
at their November meeting in Mon-
treal.
Dr. D. W. Springer, superintendent
of the Homoeopathic hospital, an-
nounced yesterday that Dr. W. W.
Williams, of Bronson, Mich., has been
added to the Homoeopathic surgical
staff.
HARDING BECOMES
32ND DEGR EE MASON
Columbus, Ohio, Jan. 5.-President-
elect Harding became a 32nd degree
Mason tonight at the end of a 12 hour
initiation ceremony participated in by
ranking officials of the order from all
parts of the United States. Mr. Hard-
ing was the third chosen chief execu-
tive to travel through the higher de-
grees of Masonry before Scioto Val-
ley Consistory, James A. Garfield and
William McKinley having been given
the 32nd degrees here.
MINERS WARNED AGAINST
USE OF ARMY GAS MASK
Washington, Jan. 5.-Implicit faith
in an instrument that saved the lives
of thousands of American soldiers in
France is daily endangering the lives
of scores of men in industrial life in
the United States, Dr. F. G. Cottrell,
director of the bureau of mines said
today, in another warning against the
use of army masks in mine explosions
and mine fires. Despite repeated
warning from the department, miners
and persons engaged in mine rescue
work persist in using army gas masks,
Dr. Cottrell said, although the devices
are of practically no use in the aver-
age mine disaster.
The army mask affords absolutely
no protection against carbon monoxide
gas, which is most prevalent in mine
fires and factory disasters, Dr. Cot-
trell said, adding that the masks will
actually be a menace because of the
false feeling of security they give the
wearer.
Lord Reading to Be Viceroy of India
London, Jan. 5.-Lord Reading, the
lord chief justice and former special
ambassador to the United States, has
decided to accept the post of viceroy
of India, according to the evening
papers.

In describing his method in meas-
uring the diameters of stars by a
method of light interference, Prof. A.
A. Michelson of Chicago, at a recen,
meeting of the American association4
for the advancement of science, told1
of the measuring an angle of the-
order of .046 of a second of an arc.
This is the smallest angle ever meas-
ured, it is said.
It was done in connection with the1
star Capella, which to the telescope
appears as a luminous point without1
diameter, but which Professor Mich-,
elson finds has a diameter of 27,000,-1
000 times greater than our sun. j
Is Foremost Physicist
The smallness of this angle may
possibly be more readily understood
by saying that it is approximately the
angle which an orange twenty miles
away would subtend.
According to Prof. H. M. Randall,1
of the physics department, the de-
velopment of this method will marki
an epoch in astrophysics. He states1
that Professor Michelson, who re-
ceived the Nobel prize in physics a
few years ago, is. the foremost physi-
cist in America.,
Two other papers of import were1
one in which it was shown that mag-
nesium consisted of atoms, whose
parts were of different weight, but
which could not be chemically sepa-
rated, and a second showing that
chlorine consiIted of atoms whose
parts, or isotopes, were of two dif-
ferent weights.
Professor Honored3
Both of these results are in accord-;
ance with recent developments of the
atomic theory according to which the
atomic weight of all atoms should be
expressed as whole numbers being
built up of hydrogen nuclei and elec-
trons.
Professor Randall attended the
meeting of the Spectroscopic commit-
tee of the National Research council.
He was elected to the council of the
American Physical society.
School Extension Planned by Detroit
Detroit, Jan. 5.--All pupils in De-
troit schools will be able to attend
full sessions daily beginning with
the fall term of this year, under the
contemplated building program of the
board of education, Dr. John S. Hall,
a member of the board, said today.
During the year 11 additions and 5
complete new schools will be erected.
At present Dr. Hall said there are
18,903 children attending school only
half of the day. This, however, shows
an improvement over the attendance
report for September, last, when 20,
000 children were on half time.

ING DEPARTMENT
During =the vacation Profs. H. H.
Higbie and W. F. Davidson, of the
electrical engineering department,
have been conducting experiments in
light and illumination.
The first experimenthas as its ob-
ject to find out why it is that ,some
gases act like incandescent solids
when ignited, instead of behaving like
a true ga. According to Professor
Davidson the problem first suggested
itself in the action of a Cooper-Hew-
itt vapor lamp in not transmitting
light equally in all directions. How-
ever, a kerosene flame, acting like a
true gas, sheds light equally on all
sides.
Professor Davidson states that pos-
sibility of an increased efficiency in
construction of all lighting fixtures,
by changing the present shape, is sug-
gested in working the problem.
Another experiment being consider-
ed is the efficiency of various types
of coating for use in, constructing re-
flectors and painting walls. One of
the important possibilities of this ex-
periment is shown by the fact that the
amount of light useful from any par-
ticular lamp may be doubled by in-
creasing the reflecting- power of a
room from 80 to 90 per cent, says Pro-
fessor Davidson.

I I

I

I

OVER THE WIRE

I

I

I '

Gifts of $1,000 and $250 for the Un-
ion swimming pool were announced
yesterday by Maynard Newton, '22,
chairman of the swimming pool cam-
paign
Robert L Lamont, '91E, president of
the American Steel Foundries com-
pany of Chicago, gave the $1,000 He
was solicited by H. W. Slaughter, '24.
F. S. Kresge, of Detroit, president of
the chain of five and ten cent stores
throughout the country, gave the
$250.
Not All Students Give Report
The total reported up to last night
was $8,750. Many students have not
as yet given reports. Those having
money are requested to hand it in
with the cards at the Union desk or
business office. Union officials are
confident that the amount will reach
$15,000.
The reason ascribed by Newton for
the poor showing was that although
the students worked hard during the
vacation, the Christmas holidays with
its consequent drawing on the finan-
cial resources, the business depression
and various relief drives, made money
hard to get.
Discuss Continuance of Project
As yet the plan for getting the rest
of the money has not materialized.
Several ways are being considered.
One of these is to carry on a similar
campaign during the spring vacation.
It has also been suggested that per-
sonal letters be sent to influential
Michigan men asking donations, or
the local Michigan clubs about the
country may be called into service as
during the drive for the new build-
ing.
Students, who did not see the alum-
ni of their home town during the vaca-
tion, might write personal letters to
them themselves. Any wishing to do
this will be aided in any way neces-
sary by the Union officials.
S. C. A. EXTENSION
WORK WELL TAKEN
Extension work carried on by the
Students Christian association in the
high schools throughout the state
have been favorably received, accord-
ing to L. G. Reimann, '16, secretary
of the association, and great difficulty
is being experienced in filling the ap-
plications for men to speak through-
out the state.
To give high school students the
college man's view of religion and to
encourage high school men to get a
college education are the purposes of
the extension service. The service is
also co-operating with the social serv-
ice and religious agencies of Detroit
in placing men interested In that
work in Detroit institutions so that
they may obtain practical experience.
A summer camp is also contemplated
for the poor children of Detroit.
The men on. the team this year who
are going out and talking at high
schools about the state are: Stewart
Baxter, '21, Angus Goetz, '22M, Paul
Eaton, '21, Abe J. Cohn, '21L, Elton
E.. Weiman,'21, V. C. Nelson, '22,
Joyce Stedman, '22, Robert Kneebone,
'21, Edward Ramsdell, '23, Harry Kip-
ke, '24, Paul Relmus, '23, Ray Yates,
'23, R. Jerome Dunne, '22, Frank
Bailey, '21, Don Porter, '21, and M.
S. Lu, '21.
Medical Advice By Radio Now Given
New York, Jan. 5.-Medical advice
by radio, designed to save life in event
of sickness or accident at sea by ap-
plying proper treatment until person-
al service of a physician or surgeon
can be obtained, is now possible.
A new emergency radio call-the
letters "KDKF" has been established
-planned to take its place with the

international S. 0. S. call of vessels
in distress.

Washington, Jan. 5.-Daniel O'Cal-
laghan, lord mayor of Cork, who came
to America as a stowaway to tell the
commission investigating conditio4
in Ireland about the burning of his
town, may be denied admission to the
country. In announcing today that
an investigation into the circumstanc-
es surrounding his arrival yesterday,
state department officials intimated{
that unless the inquiry developed un-
usual conditions in his case the lord
mayor would'be given no greater con-
sideration than usually is accorded
aliens arriving without passports. Im-
migration authorities here also are
conducting an inquiry to determine
whether the lord mayor is admissable
under the immigration laws. In the
meantime he is being held in custody
at Newport News.
Honolulu, T. H., Dec., 6.-(Corres-
pondence of the Associated Press).-
The Hawaiian Planters association ati
a recent meeting decided not to grant
the demands of plantation laborers
for an increase in the basic wage
scale from $30 to $40 a month under
the present conditions of the sugar
market.
Filipino laborers recently submit-
ted to the association a demand for a
straight daily wage of $2.50 without
a bonus.
Detroit, Mich., Jan. 5.-Prohibition
has not increased the number of drug
addicts in Michigan, according to
Joseph F. Dederich, federal narcotic
agent here. He made the statement
after having received many queries,
he said.
"A drug addict will not drink liquor
and neither will a drunkard use;
drugs," Mr. Dederich said. "Our rec-
ords show no increase in the number
of drug users since the advant of pro-
hibition."

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