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December 19, 1920 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-19

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Be of Service-Work for the Pool1
__ - fi--ASSOCIATED
SECTION PRESS
__. X NAAHAU 4r 1 Irn tF
ONE#kn 43 tt AAMNIHFuz
VOL. XXXI. No. 65. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1920. PRICE FIVE CEN~

..

t I

CHARGES AGAINST
MARINES IN HAYTI
NOT TRUE, REPORT

NAVAL COURT OF INQUIRY
ACCUSATIONS WERE
UNFOUNDED

SAYS

COMMEND CORPS FOR
EXCELLENT SERVICE
Organization Granted Clea Bill By
Tribunal; Findings Approved
By Daniels
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 18.- The naval
court of inquiry which investigated
the conduct of marines in Hayti re-
ported to Secretary Daniels today
that there "had been no proper
grounds" for the statement by Brig-
adier General George Barnett, form-
er commander of the marine corps
that the American occupation forces
had been guilty of "practically indis-
criminate killing" of Haytians.
After a careful survey of conditions
the court, presided over by Rear Ad-
miral Henry T. Mayo, found that Gen-
eral Barnett's charges were "ill con-
sidered, regretable and a thorough-
ly unwarranted reflection" on the
work of the marine corps in Hayti,
adding that the corps hadeperformed
difficult, dangerous and delicate duty
worthy of the highest commendation.
The marines virtually were given a
clean bill by the court which declined
to recommend trial by court martial
of Freeman-Lang, of Los Angeles, and
Doras Williams, of Birmingham, Ala-
bama, charged by native witnesses at
Port Au Prince, with the murder of
Haytians. Lang and Williams' cases
were not mentioned by the report and
naval officials explained that this
meant that the evidence against them
was not deemed sufficient to demand
criminal prosecution.
In all "isolated" cases of unjustified
conduct by marines, the court found
that disciplinary action already had
been taken.
Thefindings were approved by Sce-
retary . Daniels and Maj. Gen. John
A. Leeune, commandant of the mar-
ine corps.
CHURCHES ARRANGE
VACATION PARTIES
Two parties will be held in Lane
hall during the Christmas holidays
for the students remaining in the
city. These are in charge of two rep-
resentatives chosen from each church
who will handle the work of the part-
ies.
In addition to the parties, it is be-
ing arranged to have every student in
the city at Christmas dinner with
some Ann Arbor family. A committee
is in charge of the work of arranging
for the people to invite tsudents of
their choice or if they do not know
anyone they particularly desire, the
committee will put them in touch
with some whom they may invite.
Work will also be done in the local
hospitals during the holidays for the
invalids.
Calls for student teams for hospital
work will be issued by those who are
familiar with the needs of the hospit-
als, and the teams with their musical
instruments, and songs and stories
will entertain the groups of invalids
which will be assembled at the hos-
pitals.
DRIVER LOSES CONTROL AND
TRUCK CRASHES INTO STORE
A small delivery truck driven by
Bruck Gregory, an Ann Arbor high
school student, crashed into the show
window of the C. R. Nash grocery
store, South University avenue and
Church street, at 11 o'clock yester-
day morning and caused damages to
the building which were estimated at

$400.
DAILY SUSPENDS PUBLICA-
ATION
With this issue The Daily sus-j
pends publication until after
the holidays. The next issue
will appear Jan. 5, 1921.

Jiasques 'Presents
"Greatest Gift"
(By F. W. 0.)
Little children peering eagerly in-
to windows bright with holiday trim-
mings, a hawker of mechanical toys,
and a Salvation Army Santa Claus
calling for silver pieces, discovered
in the opening act of "The Greatest
Gift," Masques' Chstmas play, pre-
ceded by Noel carols sung by the
Girls' Glee club, gave the predom-
inating note of Christmas cheer to the
Women's league party yesterday.
The third act, portraying Christ-
mas eve, found the little ones: Hel-
en Elliot, '23, as Mary; Esther Welty,
'23, as Peter; Dolly Saunders, '23, as
Agnes, and David Nelson, as Benny,
tucked in bed. Bertral Summers, '22,
as "Fee Noel" with her attendant
elvesechildren from the dpublic
schools came in and finding that the
poor kiddies had no dreams, spun a few
filled with the spirit of the season.
Amy Loomis, '22, as Grandpa Burden,
proved adept in the art of impersona-
tion.
"The Greatest Gift" will be pre-
sented at 4 o'clock Monday before the
hospital and public school children
of Ann Arbor. University women are
also invited.
STADIUM PLANS WILL
BE FINISHED SOO0N
CHANGES NECESSITATED BY NEW
CONFERENCE RULINGS MUST
BE MADE
Preliminary plans for the new
$400,000 "U" stadium will be drawn
up by the engineering department
during Christmas vacation in order
that bids for the construction may be
received as early as possible. It is
expected that all bids will be in and
the final specifications arranged soon
after the first of January.
The "U" engineers will also have
to revise the running track at Ferry
field due to a change in the Confer-
ence track rulinis. One of the new
rulings states that the straight-away
must contain six lanes necessitating
a track width of 24 feet. The present
straight-away is only 20 feet wide.
To remedy this situation a cut will be
made between the track and the foot-
ball field.
Another new Conference rule
makes the length of the quarter mile
track unofficial and an alteration will
be necessary to standardize It.
Union Dancing Class to Meet Monday
E. Mortimer Shuter's workshop
dancing class will meet at 8 o'clock
tomorrow evening in the Union work-
shop for the last time until after the
vacation.
An advanced class is to be formed
after the holidays of the members of
the present class who successfully
complete their work. In addition to
the advanced class, a preparatory
course will be organized for begin-
ners.
P1 Delta Epsilon Meets Today
There will be a' special meeting of
PI Delta Epsilon at 11 o'clock this
morning at the Union.

"TK RE Il, BRING ACK MOLEY FOR
POOL, MAKE FOLKS HAPPY,"SAYS PRESIDENT
December, 19, 1920.
TO THE STUDENTS:
The Michigan Daily has asked me to write a brief word of greet-
ing to you, and I am happy to accept the invitation.
A vacation, I believe, is a time to vacate. So I hope that you are
planning to empty your heads (if need be!) and have a real vacation.
No man really enjoys University life or gets the most out of it who
uses the main ring of the circus for the side show. Likewise the se-
rious minded student must not forget that vacations are not provided
for purposes of hard study. A real change is desireable and nec-
essary.
And while you vacate, remember that you are inevitably repre-
senting the University of Michigan. Bring back the $50,000 for the
swimming pool at the Union and let it be quietly but firmly under-
stood that your University knows that its legislative program is
based on solid facts.
Above all, have a genuinely Merry Christmas by doing your
share to make the "folks at home" happy. They have suffered. and
sacrificed for. you more than you will ever know. Make them see
that it has been worth while. If you "make good" in the best sense
of the term during this vacation you will do it by givingjnmistak-
able evidence of filial devotion and affection. You may not under-

stand that even "Dad" is willing
really caI% for him.

to be told, in some way, that you
M. L. BURTON.

HOUSE APPROVES
FINANCEMEA9SURE
Bill, Introduced By Senate, .Would
Provide Aid for Farmers;
Okts 212-61 Votes
CALLED LEGISLATION FOR A
CLASS BY REP. MC FADDEN
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 18.-The senate
resolution to revive the war finance
corporation as a measure of relief for
farmers was approved by the house
late today in amended form by a vote
of 212 to 61. It now goes to confer-
ence for adjustment with the senate
measure.
The house struck out Section 2 of
the senate resolution stating the op-
inion of congress that the federal re-
serve banks should allow liberal cred-
its to farmers.
The final vote was relieved by sev-
eral hours of debate in which Chair-
man McFadden, of the banking com-
mittee, led the opposition. He char-
acterized the measure as class legis-
lation which would lead to inflation
and charged that its proponents had
deluded the farmers into believing it
would help them.
Rdpresentatlve Mann, Republican,
of Illinois, supporting the bill, said
he did not see how it would do harm
and that it probably would do some
go .

CORRECTION

RELIEF CAMPAIN
Need for Funds to Aid Starving Eu-
ropeanrChildren Urgent, Says
Professor Lombard
HOOVER NATIONAL CHAIRMAN
OF COUNTRYWIDE DRIVE
"Need of responding to the national
collection for suffering children in
central and eastern Europe is so
urgent that the committee will not
tell the quota that Washtenaw coun-
ty is supposed to raise," states Prof.
Warren P. Lombard,' of the physiol-
ogy department and chairman of the
committee in charge of this county.
The total amount asked is $33,-
000,000. Ten dollars will keep a child
from starving, while local organiza-
tions =will furnish the rest. Families
all over the country are going to be
asked to have one or more "Invisible
Guests" at their Christmas table. The
collection will be made 4from Dec. 19
to 31.
Children's Day in Churches
Today is to be Children's Relief
day in all the churches in the coun-
try, and people can contribute then
if they so desire, or contributions in
this county can be sent to Prof. War-
ren P. Lombard, 805 Oxford Road.
Under Herbert Hoover, national
chairman, eight great relief organi-
zations have joined in the formation
of the relief council so that there will
be no crossing of effort in relieving
the children, and the overhead will be
cut down to a minimum, thus making
it possible to save a greater number
of the 3,500,000 children now threat-
ened with starvation.1
Mrs. Burton on Committee
Seventeen thousand relief stations
have been established, where children
are being fed, but these Professor
Lombard declares have only enough
to carry them a month, and the chil-
dren must be fed until next harvest.
Professor Lombard states that this
campaign has no connection with the
drive for Austrian students.
Mrs. Marion LeRoy Burton is a
member of the Central- Michigan com-
mittee for the campaign.
SPECIAL TO CHICAGO WILL
HAVE ENOUGH COACHES
Enough coaches will be run on the
Chicago Special, which leaves here
just ahead of the regular 1:23 train
Tuesday, according to local Michigan
Central railroad authorities. This re-
port is issued to contradict previous
stories that all tickets for this train
had been sold out.
The passenger agent also stated
that although tickets had been sold
since Dec. 1 no baggage had been
checked as yet. Unless the baggage
is brought down to the station before
the time of leaving there is apt to be
a great deal of' confusion and delay.
He said that it would simplify matters
to a great extent if persons would
send their trunks to the station as
soon as possible.

Viotany Profs To
Attend Ileeting
Michigan will be represented by
several memebrs of the botanical staff
at the scientific meetings to be held
in Chicago during Christmas week,
some of whom will read papers be-
fore the Botanical Society of Amer-
ica.
Those scheduled to appear on pro-
grams are Profs. Harley H. Bartlett,
B. M. Davis, Calvin H. Kaufman,
Frederick C. Newcombe, James B.
Pollock, and Mr. Carl D. La Rue. Oth-
er members of the staff who will at-
tend are Prof. John H. Ehlers and
Mr. Baxter. Professor Davis will pre-
side at the sessions of the Society of
American Naturalists and Professor
Kauffman at the sessions of the My-
cological section of the Botanical So-
ciety of America.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUBS TO
HOLD CONVENTION HERE
PROMINENT SPEAKERS INCLUDED
IN PROGRAM STARTING
DEC. 27
With President Marion L. Burtona
the prinicpal speaker on the pro-1
gram, the Association of Cosmopolitan
Clubs, with executive headquarters
at the University of Michigan, is readyl
to open its fourteenth annual conven-
tion which is to be held Dec. 2, 28,(
29, in Ann Arbor. Bernard L. Beck-t
with, '21E, and Winifred O'Connor,t
'21, presidents of the executive chap-1
ter of the association, will deliver the
welcoming addresses to the delegates.
All business meetings of the con-
vention will be held in Lane hall aud-
itorium; and luncheons and dinners
will be served at Newberry hall. Prof.
Albert Lockwood and Mrs. Peter Ok-
kelberg, both connected with the Uni-
versity School of Music, will have
charge of the convention's musical
program.
The speakers will be as follows:t
Dec. 27, Prof. Thomas E. Rankin of
the rhetoric department; Dec.28, Dr.
Victor Vaughan, dean of the medical
college, Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, con-t
vention president, and Dr. Lynn Har-
old Hough, former president of North-E
western university; Dec. 29, Prof. Ed-
win Dickinson of the Law school.
F. C. Liu, '21L, will act as toast-
master at the convention banquet,t
which will be held on the evening of
Dec. 29, the last day of the convention
in Ann Arbor. The speakers at thet
banquet will be President-emeritust
Harry B. Hutchins, President Marion
LeRoy Burton, and Dean Myra B.I
Jordan.
The entire convention, which willI
consist of from 35 to 50 delegates1
from different universities in the Unit-
ed States and Canada, will be the1
guest of the Detroit Board of Com-
merce at a luncheon in DetroitY
Dec. 30.
STUDENTS SWARM
TO DEAN'S OFFICE
An unusually large number of re-
quests from students desiring to be1
excused before the beginning of the
holiday vacation have been consider-
ed by Dean John R. Effinger during
the last few days. This .condition isE
attributed to the large enrollment in1
the literary department this year, and'
to the fact that there are but twot

days of classes this week.
In the opinion of Dean Effinger, a1
majority of the reasons presented to
him by students are true. Students
who could not arrive home in time for
Christmas if they stayed for classes
Monday and Tuesday were given fav-
orable consideration. The advisability
of excusing those who are working
their way through the University was
recognized so that they might have
Christmas week in which to earn ex-
tra money.
"It is very natural for students to
desire to get away a few days ear-
ly," said Dean Effinger. "During the
last few days there has been con-
stantly brought to my mind the re-
mark which Dr. Angell used to make:
'If the students were given a vacation
of 364 days, they would want the
other day to get home.'"
THE WEATHER
Probably Snow Flurries; Not Mucb
Change in Temperature

NORMAL WITHERS
ONE TOMTHER'SS MEN
CLOSE GUARDING BY WILLIAMS
BREAKS UP PLAY OF-
VISITORS
COME-BACK RESULTS
IN SCORE OF 26 TO 12
Fast Work in Second Half by Karpus
and Whitlock Snatch Victory
from Western Men
Displaying an attack which swept
Western Normal off its feet in the
second half, Michigan downed the
Normal team last night. at Water-
man gymnasium by the score of 26
to 12. The Wolverine five exhibited
a fast brand of basketball and pre.
sented an. offense which their oppon-
ents could not solve and a defense
which they could not penetrate. Play
in the fir'st half was marked by close'
guarding and short passing by both
sides. In the opening period the
Normal quintet held a slight advan-
tage over Mather's men and aided by
accurate foul shooting they were able
to hold the long end of a $ to 4 score.
Karpus Enters Game
With the opening of the second
half Captain Karpus was sent in for
Miller at left forward. For the
opening minutes of this period neither
team was able to score but suddenly
the Michigan team opened up with a
burst of speed which dazzled the vis-
itors and put the game away safely.
For Michigan Williams' great work
at guard kept many points from be-
ing scored, while the big guard was
always present when the ball was be-
ing carried down the floor. Weiss at
center put up -one of the best games
he has ever played. Weiss was re-
sponsible to a large degree for the low
scoring of the visiting team for his
blocking broke up the kind of at-
tack which Kalamazoo Normal was
able to use effectively last year.
Against Miller, the Normal center,
Buck put up a fight which has won
the favorable comment of all. Mil-
ler was rated as one of the strong-
est oposing players and the. way
which the Michigan center held him
and at the same time kept the Wol-
verines score climbing was largely.
the cause of the Normal's collapse.
Rea's Guarding Effective
Captain Karpus, although not in
first class condition, was injected in-
to the play at the opening of 'the
second half with the hope that his
presence would start the Wolverines
on the road to victory. Whitlock and
Rea also put up a speedy game. Whit-
lock's blocking was always in evi-
dence and he was able to put three
baskets through the ring. Rea's close
guarding kept the visitors' score at a
minimum.
REV. WALLICIC RESIGNS TO
TAKE UP WORK WITH S. C. A.
Lloyd M. Wallick, who has acted as
pastor of Trinty Lutheran church of
Ann Arbor for the past three years,
has resigned his position there to de-
vote his time entirely to work in the
Students' Christian association.
Rev. Wallick's time will be divided
equally between his work as a mem-
ber of the Lane hall staff and his
work as as the representative among
the local Lutheran students, of the

Board of Education of the United Lu-
theran church in America.
Weiman Speaker at Detroit Banquet
"Tad" Weiman, '21, Varsity tackle,
will be the principal speaker at the
banquet of the Detorit Western High
school for the presentation of the
high school insignia to the men twho
earned it in football this fall. Wei-
man will go to Detroit under the au-
spices of the S. C. A. Extension serv-
ice.

Due to error, it was stated in Satur-
day's Daily that Isadore M. Cohn,
'22M, had been suspended from the
University for the remainder of the
semester for cheating in an examina-
tion The student suspended was Is-
adore Myron Cohn, a sophomore lit.
Isador Mayer Cohn is a junior medic,
a graduate of the lit college, and his
record has been above criticism. The
confusion was due to the fact that the
Student's Directory contained but one
Cohn.

TWO WEEKS FOR MICHIGAN
Next Tuesday our exodus will mark the real beginning of the
campaign for funds to complete the Union swimming pool. Enough
has been said already concerning the need for work to inspire the
entire 6,500 men of Michigan to get busy and put the proposition
over; now what remains is work and spirit on the part of every
single one of us.
We have all been talking about the need for a pool of just the
sort which is now in the course of construction, and now is our
chance to make it a reality. Just because we have been conserva-
tive in making pledge estimates is no reason why we need to be
unduly conservative with our energies in going after the money,
nor why any man should stop work as son as he has raised the
amount of his pledge. That isn't the way Michigan men do things
and it is not the way to put this campaign among the list of suc-
cessful Michigan achievements.
The sectional clubs have organized for work, lists have been
compiled of alumni in all parts of the country, and with the help
of these lists and the organizing of-student workers the campaign
is en route to success. But we've got to work and we should not
limit our aggressive energies in tackling alumni and anybody else
who is a Michigan supporter, until the campaign is over and the
pool is assured. Don't be afraid of getting more than the amount
needed; anything extra can be used to good advantage on other
parts of the Union building.
Michigan men, opportunity is knocking at our door. Are we
at home?

IEEETING CALLED

Students from the following
cities are asked to meet at the
Union: .St. ClaIr, at' II:3b
o'clock today (room will be
posted on Union bulletin board);
Toledo, 4x'cloolN tomorrow, room
804; Bay City, 4 o'clock tomor-
row, room 302.

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