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December 15, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-15

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TH E WEATHER -4ihn I41lFASOCITE
SNOW AND COLDER PRESS
TODAY 4 t~ #ua i EVC
VOL XXXI. No. 61. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

NEW ASTRONOMY
THEORY. ADVANCED
POSSIBLE EXPLANATION OFFER-
ED FOR ACTION OF SMALL
PLANETS
MOTION OF ASTEROIDS
MAY BE FORCASTED

IF YOU-
Were an alumnus oi the Uni-
Iversity, and a student came
around to you this Christmas
vacation, and told you about our
Union and what it means to stu-
dent life at Michigan, and that
$50,000 are needed to complete
the swimming pool, and asked
you to contribute a nominal sum
toward that end-
Would you do it?
Of course you would, and so
will every loyal Michigan alum-
nus.
One thousand, six hundred
and forty-eight students are go-
ing to give the alumni a chance
to do this next week. Sign up
your card at the Union desk
today.
STADI.UM PLANS TO
PERMIT EXPANS ION

Seeretary of Engineering College
nounces Research Results at
Mathematical Club Meeting

An-

The results of an extended re-
search as to the cause in the gaps In
the belt of small planets between
Mars and Jupiter were announced by
Prof. Louis A. Hopkins, professor of
mathematics and secretary of the col-
lege of engineering, at a meeting of
the Mathematical club last evening.
Watson Discovers Asteroids
Of these 800 asteroids, 22 were dis-
covered by Professor Watson, former
director of the observatory. In the
stream of small planets which form
this belt, gaps, up to this time of un-
explained cause, were noticed. About
Jupiter these gaps appear when an
asteroid completes its revolution
around the sun in exactly one-half
the time that it takes Jupiter to go
around the sun. In Saturn's rings
there is a corresponding gap of ap-
proximately 2,000 miles.
By means of processes conceived by
French mathematicians and developed
in this country, Professor Hopkinst
has offered a possible explanation,
which, in brief, is as follows: That
an astronomical body attempting to
move steadily within these gaps
would be forced either outward or
inward from them, thus maintainng
the gap. .
May Forecast Motion
Methods by which the motion of
certain of these asteroids may be
forecasted, and thus followed for a
considirable number of years 'have
also been developed by Professor
Hopkins in connection with his inves-
tigations as to the cause of the gaps.
These methods, according to Professor
Hopkins, bear a similarity to those
used in foretelling positions of the
moon.
CHRISTMAS CHIMES
ON CAMPUS TODAY
Chimes will offer Its Christmas
number for sale today on the campus.
'.Ncolosing this is sue of .the - magazine
is a cover said to be the best of any
publication's. Christmas number in the
history of Michigan. It depicts on a
background of deep blue the star of
Bethlehem, together with the historic
shepherds and their camels.
"The price will be 25 cents, as us-
ual," said Maurice Atkinson, '21, busi-
ness manager of the Chimes. "When
it is considered that each copy of the
magazine costs us 39 1-2 cents, it can
be seen that the price charged is ex-
ceptionally low."1
Athletics play a big part in the cur-.
rent issue. There is a timely soccer
story, besides the feature, "Ruth Up,
Pratt On Deck," by John A, Bacon,
'23, about Michigan's new baseball
mentor and his experiences in the big
leagues,.
STUDENT APPLICATIONS FOR
PQSTOFFICE JOBS REJECTED
Many student applications for po-
sitions in the Detroit postoffice dur-
pg the holiday season have been re-
jeeted because of the large number of
applicants. More than 5,000 unem-
pl9yed men have applied for jobs at
the Detroit postal stations, many of
them being ex-service men who for-
merly. were mail carriers. To
date 20 applications have been filed
through the local postoffice,
Gipp Dead; to Be Honored by Students
South Bend, Dec. 15.-Hundreds of
admirers of George Gipp, noted Notre
Deae football player, who died here
early this morning, viewed the re-
mains which lay in state tonight. The
student body of Notre Dame will ac-
company the body to the train to-

morrow morning, when it will be
shipped to Laurium,- . Michigan, for
burial. Several members of the No-
tre Dame football team will attend

Closing of East End and Erection
Balcony Would Make Local
Stands Largest

of

"U" SHOULD BE FINISHED BY
FALL, SAYS PROF. CISSE%
Although the construction of a new
west stand and a new northstand to
complete the "U" stadium on Ferry
field at a cost of approximately $400,-
000 will almost double the present
seating capacity of 23,000, great fu-
ture expansion is anticipated in the
plans of the engineering college staff.
Providing for the closing of the east
end some day and the erection of a
balcony around the stadium, the seat-
ing capacity would then be 78,500, the
largest in the country and greater
than the Yale bowl by about 16,000.
Cissel Draws Plans
"If contractors' bids are accepted
next month and work is commenced
in early spring, there is no reason
why the "U" should not be finished
by fall," said Prof. J. H. Cissel of the
Engineering college, who drew the
plans.
It is quite likely, officials believe,
that before the east end is closed, a
balcony will be built around the "U."
Such a balcony would increase the
seating capacity of the stadium to 59,-
100 which even without the closed
east end, would be itself nearly as
big as the largest bowl in the coun-
try today.
Extending over the top of the stands
a distance of 40 feet, there are to be
22 rows in the balcony which will seat
about two-fifths gas many people as
the present stands. The vertical
curve will be much steeper in the bal-
cony than in the stands. While the
height of the stands will be 53 feet,
the balcony will tower into the air
37 feet still higher, or a distance of
90 feet above the ground level.
Tunnels to Be Built
Tunnels will be built into the west
stand in order to permit a 220 yard
straightaway for track men. When
the stadium is completed about 120
yards will be in the open, while the
remaining 100 yards will be run in
the tunnels. Two tracks, one on eith-
er side of the field, will necessitate
two tunnels in the stand.
Plans for the construction of the
proposed new north stand call for a
clear space of 40 by 400 by 1 feet
under the stand. Only conjecture
can be made as to what this space
will be used for. Skating rinks have
been suggested.
Additional entrances to Ferry field
will be built when the "U" is com-
pleted, officials believe. Instead of
the one entrance to the field, there
will be four: one on the northwest
corner, near Division street, one in
the middle of the north stand, the
present entrance on the northeast
corner, and an east entrance.
DEAN BATES WILL SPEAK AT
ALL-LAW SMOKER TONIGHT
Dean Henry M. Bates and the var-
tous law class presidents will be the
principal speakers at the All-Law
smoker to be held at 7:30 'o'clock to-
night in the Union. Nobe Wetherbee's
orchestra will furnish the music,
while Ransom M. Sherman, '23, will
entertain. The usual smokes, cider,
and doughnuts will be furnished.
Tickets are on sale in the Law build-
ing today.

Christmas Cheer
Will Be Brought
To Poor Children
Ann Arbor hospitals have more
than 150 poor children in their wards,
some of them sick and some of them
permanently crippled. These young-
sters have heard the tale of Santa
Claus, and they are all looking for-
ward to what he will bring them
Christmas morning. Whether they
are disappointed depends upon the
way the campus responds to the re-
quest for help in bringing Christmas
to them.
Boxes will Appear today on the
diagonal walk in which donations to
the fund for the poor youngsters may
be placed. The money so collected
will be used by local charitable or-
ganizations to provide for the hospi-
tal children and for the children of'
poor families of the city who other-
wise would have no Christmas.
A Christmas tree party has been
arranged for the tots at 4:30 o'clock
Tuesday afternon at Lane hall. Ice
cream and candy will be given to
the youngsters, and they will be en-
tertained by a skit put on by the
Women's league. The Union will
furnish music for the party. Students
are invited to attend that they nay
have a chance to see the tots have a
real Christmas time of it.
The committee has requested the
use of an automobile Thursday after-I
noon to assist in getting the children
to Lane hal. Any student who can
furnish a car is asked to inform Lew-
is Reimann at Lane hall or Hulda
Bancroft at 996-R.
Those wishing to send contribu-
tions for the youngsters' Christmas
may mail them to J. B. Brill, '21, at
707 Oxford road.
CAST FOR BUNTY PULS
THE STRINGS' NNOUNCED
PLAY HAD EXCEPTIONAL TWO
YEAR RUNS IN NEW YORK
AND LONDON
Results of the tryouts for the cast
of "Bunty Pulls the Strings," the
play which will be given under the
auspices of the Comedy club, March
9, at the Whitney theater, have been
announced and those making the cast
are as follows: Frances Maire, '21,
John Hassberger, '23, Richard For-
sythe, '22L, Clement Smith, '23, Cam-
ilia Hayden, '22, Mildred Sherman,
'21, Carrie Smith, '21, Aubrey Young,
'21E, and Carrie Fairchild, '21.
Many of these persons have taken
part in previous campus productions
with a great degree of success and in
some cases their Scotch descent will
aid materially in the portraying of
the Scottish types.
The play was written. by Graham
Moffat. It ran for two straight
years in London and had an equally
successful run in New York. In the
latest issue of the Theater magazine
the play was referred to as "the un-
forgettable 'Bunty Pulls the Strings'."
The cast met last night at the home
of Mrs. Smeaton, on Washtenaw ave-
nue, and parts were assigned and
plans were made for the rehearsals
which will begin . shortly after the
Christmas holidays. The play will
be presented under the direction of
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the eng-
ineering college.
SOPHOMORE PROM WAR TAX
REFUYNDED BY GOVERNMENT

Rebates Not Called for Will Be Turned
Over to Union Swimming
Pool Fund
The United States Treasury depart-
ment has refunded the war tax col-
lected for last year's Sophomore
prom because profits from the dance
were applied on the campus theater
fund. All students on record as hav-
ing bought tickets, to the prom are
entitled to a rebate of 46 cents. This
may be obtained at the Union lobby
desk from 1 to 6 o'clock Thursday,
Dec. 16. Checks have already been
mailed to all those who put in claims
for the rebate last spring. All other
rebates that are not called for at the
appointed time will be applied on the
Union swimming pool fund. A com-
plete record of all receipts and ex-
penditures for the Sophomore prom is
in the registrar's office and is open to
the inspection of anyone interested.

'SECTIO.NAL CLUBS
ORGANI ZE TO PUT
POOL DRIVE OVER
LANSING AND PITTSBURGH MEN
FIRST TO TAKE. ACTION IN
NEW MOVEMENT
20 FRATERNITIES YET
TO TURN IN REPORTS
Present Total Pledged is $30,347.00;
Yesterday's Results Net $1,415
on 64 Cards
Use of the sectional clubs in putting
over the Union pool drive was start-
ed last night when the Lansing and
Pittsburgh students organized for the
solicitation work in those cities dur-
ing the vacation.
At the meeting of the Lansing men
the alumni in that city were appor-
tioned among the members, each, man
taking those alumni he knew the best.
Twelve pledges were signed for a
total of $950. G. S. Goodell, '22, was
T _ -

SECTIONAL CLUBS MEET

Meetings of men from the fol-
lowing- places have been called
for today in the Union: -Grand
Rapids,. at 7:15 o'clock, room
225; Kalamazoo, 7:30 o'clock,;
room 319; Saginaw, 7:30 o'clock,
room 302; Bay City, 4 o'clock,
room 302; Pennsylvania, 7:15
o'clock, room 304.
elected president of the organization,
and a smoker was planned for 7:30
o'clock Thursday in room 306 of the
Union, at which the men will com-
plete further arrangements for mak-
ing the Lansing donations run into
the thousands.
. Pittsburgh Drive Promising
The Pittsburgh meeting resulted in
12 new workers. No amounts were
specified on these cards, but Union
officials. expect a large total from that
district as many Michigan alumni are
living there, and no attempt was
made to cover the territory when the
original Union drive was conducted
to raise money for the building.
Other sectional club meetings the
scheduled for today and tomorrow at
which organization of the campaign
in other cities will be perfected.
Cards Obtainable at Union
Pledge cards can be obtained at the
Union by students who have not yet
joined in the drive. No statement of
the amount of money the workers
will raise is needed on these cards.
Reports from the fraternities still
lag, there being 20 not yet heard
from..
New pledges to the number of 64
wee received yesterday for a total
of $1,415. This makes to date 1,648
pledges for a total of $30,347.
Enter'tainment
Well Received
Featuring a well balanced program,
the movie in Hill auditorium last
night under the auspices of the Stu-
dent Committee on Athletic Affairs,
proved a decided success.
Charles Ray, in "Paris Green,"
was the principal attraction of the
evening, though the Mack Sennett
comedy and the animated cartoon
contributed their share to the enter-
tainment.
Nobe Wetherbee's orchestra furn-
ished many variations of Jazz and as
usual maintained the spirit of the au-
dience.
A fairly large crowd of students
turned out for the show and consid-
ering the number of other meetings
on the campus, the attendance was
. good. The committee in charge ex-
pressed its thanks for the splendid
support accorded the entertainment
by the students and also for the help
given by student organizations.
Prof. Root Likens Satire to Caricature
"Satire is to literature what carica-
ture is to painting," said Prof. R. K.
Root of Princeton university in his
talk on "The Art of Satire" yesterday
afternoon in the Natural Science aud-
itorium.

All Treasurers
Must Announce
Booth Locations'j
To insure the success of the first
Class Dues day Thursday, class treas-
urers should turn in the location of
their booths for collection at The
Daily or to Thornton W. Sargent Jr.,
'22, treasurer of the Student council,
at 512 South State street, and make
arrangements to have men in their
booths from 9 to 5 o'clock tomorrow.
Thus far classes in the literary col-
lege and one in the engineering have
responded to this request. It is essen-
tial that all reports be turned in by 6
o'clock tonight. Officers of the coun-
cil who explained the motives of the
Class Dues day at the recent meeting
of the class officers, urge that the
treasurers have placards printed and
displayed at their booths, stating the
class and the amount of the assess
ment. There is no objection to sev-
eral classes collecting dues from the
same place.
Senior, junior, and freshmen hits
will occupy a booth in University
hall. Sophomore lits will be in the
entrance of the Library, and fresh-
men engineers will collect their dues
in the engineering arch. The assign-
ment of other booths will be an-
nounced in Thursday's Daily..
All dues must be paid before grad-
uation, and it is to the interest of
each class to collect its dues as early
as possible for in so doing the class
will be able to participate in more
activities.
SPEAKS TOMORROW
Believes Right to Work as Sacred as1
Right to Quit; Favors
State Courts
SUBJECT TO BE "KANSAS
INDUSTRIAL SITUATION"
Gov. Henry J. Allen of Kansas will
speak tomorrow' evening at 8 o'clock
in Hill auditorium on the "Kansas
Industrial Situation," under the au-
spices of the Oratorical association.
Governor Allen was the man chosen
to nominate Gen. Leonard Wood for
the presidency in' the recent Repub-
lican convention and on this occasion
made an impressive address.
Among the most important of his
successes as governor of Kansas was
the establishment of industrial courts
in that state. These courts are for
the pyurpose of settling the difficulties
between employe and employer and
will constitute the theme of his ad-
press tomorrow night.
At a recent meeting of governors
of various states Governor Allen rec-
ommended that a wide extension of
the Kansas method be made through-
out the country, citing many Instanc-
es in which long standing wrongs bad
been rectified in his own state by its
a vption.
Governor Allen says that under the
Kansas law men may quit work
whenever they choose but that they
cannot prevent others from working
by issuing strike notices. Therefore,
to use his own words, "The right to
work- is as sacred as the right to quit
work"

FIRST ISHOWING6 oF
"MINSTRELSY" TO
BE GIVEN TONIGHT
SHUTER DECLARES PRODUCTION
TO BE CLEVEREST IN
HIS TIME
MANY EXCELLENTSEATS
ARE STILL OBTAINABLE
"Mister Macbeth, with Variatious,"
Said to Be One of Best Farces
Ever Seen Locally
"Minstrelsy," the production of the
combined musical clubs of the Michi-
gan Union,- opens its three night
stand at the Whitney tonight. Two
dress rehearsals, Monday and Tues-
day, under the direction of E. Morti-
mer Shuter, and countless drills dur-
ing the past month have prepared the
company for the. revival of the old
University minstrels and the first real
blackface show in Ann Arbor in recent
years.
Seats at Union
For the convenience of the stu-
dents, reserved seats for "Minstelsy"
will be brought up from the Whitney
theater and placed on sale from 2 to
5:30 o'clock today, tomorrow, and
Friday afternoons at the Union. Ex-
cellent seats for the production are
yet unsold, the management saying
yesterday that many more students
can be comfortably accommodated.
"Last night's rehearsal smoothed
out all the-rough places in the pro-
duction," said R. Mortimer Shuter
yesterday evening. "In the time that
I have been directing in Ann Arbor,
I don't believe that there has been
amore clever show than the one that
is offered tonight, Thursday, and Fri-
day. If the students knew the type
of a production that they will -see,
there wouldn't be a. vacant seat in the
house.
In Two Parts
Divided into two parts, "Minstrel-
sy" gives the combined clubs ample
opportunity for. singing and play-
ing, and yet the show is not entirely
musical. The quips of the end men
in the first part and special feature
in the second part by well-known
campus vaudeville artists provide va-
riety.
"Mister Macbeth with Variations,"
a negro comedy ,,skit, is said to be
one of the best farces seen on the
campus in some time.. Knight Mir-
rielees, '21E, star .of several operas
and Spotlights, makes his farewell
appearance, and Robert F. Deebah,
'23D, is on the program for a special-
ty skit.
EX-SERVICE MEN WILL HAVE
CHANCE TO MAKE COMPLAINT
All ex-service men who wish to be
listed under the federal board of vo-
oational training will have an oppor-
tunity to do so today when W,.
Crowe, a representative of this de-
partment from Chicago, will be at the
local Red Cross headquarters in the
Cornwell building.
Men who are already under the jur-
isdiction of this board and who wish
to make claims about not receiving
their checks from the government
regularly may make complaint to Mr.
Crowe at this time.
Physicians will be on hand today
to examine all men.

RECENT ROBBERY EMPHASIZES
WARNING TO LOOK DOORS

I
lF
4
I
3

The robbery of the Phi Rho Sigma
house on North Ingalls street Sunday
night emphasizes the warning of
Chief O'Brien of the police department1
that fraternity men should lock the
doors when leaving their house. Last1
night the police rounded up four sus-
pects at a late hour, one of whom, Al-,
bert Marr, of Detroit, was held. From
now on all night prowlers unable to
explain their presence will be taken,
into custody.
CHARLES S. CARRY LECTURES
ON "FRENCH HUMORISTS"
Charles S. Carry will be the speak-
er at the second lecture of the Cercle
Francais course at 4:16 o'clock this
afternoon in room 203 Tappan hall.
His subject will be: "French Humor-
ists" and, as all of the lectures on
this course, is to be delivered in
French.

SOPHOMORES VICTORIOUS IN
INTERCLASS SWIMMING MEET
Warren Hyde, '23, won the cup of-
fered by the intramural office for
highest point winner in last night's
interclass swimming meet by taking a
total of 14 points,, three ahead of
Nixon and Hubbard who won 11 each.
The meet was hotly contested from
start to finish, the final result show-
ing the sophomores leading with 39
points and the freshmen a close sec-
ond with 35 1-2.
Gas Blowing Demonstration Given
Frank Schaefer of the Laboratory
Apparatus company gave a demon-
stration of expert glass blowing be-
fore the meeting of the Michigan sec-
tion of the American Chemical society
yesterday aftefnoon in the Chemistry
building. auditorium.
The demonstration brought . out
many interesting points concerning
glass blowing.

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