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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 14, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E WEATHER
OR SNow; COLDER
TODAY

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HaJ'.1U.~A It
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT'
SERVICE

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.. -_-

VOL. XXXI. No. 60.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1920.

PRICE FIVE CEN

FIVEYEAR TICKETS
MAY FINNCE NEW
CONCRETE STNDS
$20,0O0 COULD BE REPAID IN
PERIOD OF FIVE
YEARS
BOARD TO ASK BIDS
LAST OF DECEMBER
Aigler .Says No Question of Stands
Not Being Filled at Big
Games
Securing a loan for $200,000 and the
sale of 4,000 five-year tickets at $50
each is the plan considered most like-
ly .by the Board In Control of Ath-
letics for the financing of the propos-
ed new concrete stands on Ferry field
should the bid of a contractor be ac-
cepted next month.
Holders of tickets will be entitled
to certain seats in the best section of
one of the stands at all reserved seat
football games over a period of five
years. The Athletic association will
guarantee two such games a year,
which means that the average will be
$5 a game.
No Worry
Ordinarily a seat would cost $2.50,
but it is pointed out that the pos-
sessor of such a ticket would enjoy
special privileges worth the extra
money. In the first place there would
be no worry for five years of getting
a seat, and secondly of getting a good
seat, the same one for all games.
To retire the $200,000 borrowed, it
is conservatively estimated that five
years would be sufficient. The de-
mand for tickets the past year indi-
cates that at least $40,000 could be
cleared annually with proper seating
facilities. With the sale of the spe-
cial tickets, the stands would be free
of debt in five years.
Bids Next Month
Specifications and plans for bids
'will be submitted to contractors by
the latter part of this month, and re-
plies will be here by the middle of
January. Should the bids be too high,
it is possible that th Athletic asso-
ciation might itself undertake the
building of the stands. The south
stand, which was built in 1914, was
erected by the Athletic association
at a cost of $85,000, and was free of
debt by 1917. A letter from a New
York contractor reached the board
yesterday, asking to be allowed to
bid.
"Although the completed 'U' will
seat 44,000 and 5,000 additional can
be accommodated, there is no question
that the stands will be filled at the
big games," said Prof. Ralph W. Aig-
ler, chairman of the Board In Con-
trol of Athletics, yesterday.
Burton Will Not Talk to Council
Due to the fact that President
Marion L. Burton will not be able
to be present to speak to the council-
men, the Student council banquet
planned for Wednesday night will
not take place. Instead, the custom-
ary meeting will be held at 7:15
o'clock in room 306 of the Union.

- i

I

'flinstrelsy' W ill
Open Tomorrow
Night at Whitney
"Mister Macbeth, with Variations,"
the opening number of the second
part of the Musical clubs production,
"Minstrelsy," which appears for the.
first time tomorrow night at the
Whitney, promises to be one of the
best of the skits which make up that
portion of the bill. It is a variation
from the usual acts that are featured
in campus' entertainments an~d its
novelty is expected to make it one
of the hits of the evening.
Rehearsal of the entire production
was held last night. The scenic ef-
fects, which have been in the hands
of the veteran force of Union scenic
painters and carpenters, showed up
especially well.
Tickets for all three performances
are now on sale at the Whitney.
i ,
'EARN TO HANDLE MEN,
SAYS TRIBUNE MANGER

THOMA SWI
SERIES

INAUGURATES UNIO1
OF PROFESSIONAL
SPEAKERS

"What I notice most lacking in col-
lege men is their ability to handle
men," said S. E. Thomason, '04, bus-
iness manager of the Chicago Tri-
bune, speaking Sunday at the first of
the Union's series of Sunday after-
noon meetings. His announced sub-.
ject, "The Newspaper Game," was
changed to "The Newspaper Busi-
ness," because he declared that work
to be as systematic and based on as
sound business principles as any
other.
"After you leave the University you
can't carve your way alone-you have
to work with others, and your suc-
cess will be determined by whether
or not those men want to work for
you," he continued.
"Newspaper work is as attractive
a business as any. The best way to
get practical training is by entering
an office in a large city and learning
the system and economics effected
there. Then if you want to go into
business for yourself in a smaller
city, you will have good standing in
the community and will find your
work remunerative."
More than 200 students attended
the meeting, which was the first of
the series which the Union will hold
Sunday afternoons. Men, acknowl-
edged to be the business and profes-
sional leaders in America, will speak
in an effort to give students prac-
tical advice about their own particu-
lar line of work.
THURSDAY SET FOR
CLASS DUES D AY
Inaugurating the first "Class Dues
day," the treasurers of all the classes
will collect the yearly assessment
from members of their classes in one
day, which has been set for next
Thursday. The place and time for the
payment of dues of each class will be
announced at a later date.
Handicapped in the carrying on of
class activities such as smokers, par-
ties, and athletics by insufficient
funds, the classes upon the recom-
mendation of the Student council re-
cently decided to unite in collecting
assessments. More funds will permit
an extension of class functions, ac-
cording to the treasurers, and every
effort will be made by them to collect
the money from all members.
The treasurers should: send in by
Tuesday night the station at which
they will undertake collection to
Thornton W. Sargent Jr., treasurer
of the Student council, at 512 South
State, in order that a complete list
of the booths may be published.

"P RIS GREEN"
SHOWN TONIGHT
Sennett Comedy Also Offered Tonight
in Hill Auditorium Enter-
tainment
ORCHESTRA AND QUARTET WILL
ADD TO PROGRAM OF PICTURES
With Charles Ray in "Paris Green"
as its feature, a well-rounded enter-
tainment is being furnished this eve-
ning at Hill auditorium under the au-
spices of the Student Committee on
Athletic Affairs. Supplementing the
main photoplay there is offered a new
Mack Sennett comedy full of pep and
action, which needs no other recom-
mendation than the statement that it
is one of Mack Sennett's best.
In addition to these attractive fea-
tures of the screen, several jazzy,
dance-inspiring numbers are sched-
uled by the Nobe Wetherbee orches-
tra, a harmony organization which is
guaranteed to start your feet wiggl-
ing. A comedy act by the Varsity
quartet is also on the program.
Charles Ray as usual, plays the
part of the country boy, but this time
he is relieved of the handicap of a
time-worn plot and displays his abil-
ity most effectively in something that
is new and original. The story deals
with a young hick who finds life in
the rural districts quite distressing
and is even considering an immediate
departure until one fine day a young
lady from Paris, one who speaks
French and everything, seeks refuge
from a band of crooks in Charlie's
native town.
POOL1.DRIoEfWILL BE
CONCLUDED WEDNESDAY
Only 28 additional pledges to raise
money for the Union swimming pool
were reported yesterday. These to-
taled $323, making a grand total of
$28,932 on the 1,584 cards received to
date. The drive will be discontinued
Wednesday night, irrespective of the
amount pledged.
No reports have been received
from 25 fraternities, and several of
the Union teams have not made a
creditable average. Captains are re-
quested to mkke a final effort to have
the last days of the campaign show
something nearer the desired results.
In order to take care of those stu-
dents who have not been covered in
the preliminary campaign, the Union
will have a man in the cage in the
lobby who will be provided with the
blanks necessary for the Christmas
solicitation work. Students who have
not as yet pledged to raise funds dur-
ing the holidays are asked to call
there and offer their assistance in
the drive. No money pledges will be
required, only the name and address
of the worker being requested. This
is necessary in order that the Union
may keep in touch with the solicitors
during the vacation.
DIRECTORY CHANGES MUST BE
ON FILE BY TOMORROW NIGHT
All additions and corrections to the
Students' Directory must be on file
at The Daily office not later than 4
o'clock Wednesday afternoon, if they
are to be printed in the Directory
supplement which will be run in The

Daily beginning next Thursday;
morning.
Those desiring to correct any er-
rors as to their names in the Direc-
tory should place their names, class,
home town, and Ann Arbor address
and telephone numbers on a one cent
post card and mail it to the Direc-
tory editor so as to get it to the office
not later than 4 o'clock on Wednesday
afternoon.

Occasionally - very occasionally - Michigan students have
.been so surfeited with demands for money that they have refused
to part with it; but never before the present swimming pool cam-
paign have the men of this University placed themselves in the
position of being unwilling to spare a portion of their time, a little
of their energy, to carry through a Michigan achievement.
We are asked to bring the necessity of completing the pool so
forcibly before the alumni of our home districts that they will sub-
scribe the entire amount by the time the holidays are over - a
challenge that should appeal to every man with an ounce of Michi-
gans vaunted practical loyalty. Not a cent is asked of us; only
a few hours of our vacation.
So far we have failed. Has Michigan forgotten the tremend-
ous enthusiasm, the years of untiring effort, of generous giving in
time and money, which made the Union possible? Does the present-
day undergraduate suppose that our great, men's club, first and
finest of its kind in America, rose in its place overnight, ready for
him to occupy with all its comforts and privileges? Is the spirit of
old a thing belonging to a dead past, a past in which moved a dif-
ferent breed of Michigan men? Or have we only forgotten?
. We are asked to carry out only an infinitesimal part of the
service which they rendered in handing down to us the million dol-
lar Union plant of today. 'Where the men of the original campaign
cast into the treasure-fund of Michigan loyalty every cent which
they themselves could spare, and then went forth to ask the alumni
for subscriptions ranging into the thousands of dollars, we are re-
quired only to solicit small amounts sufficient to cover the comple-
tion of a pool the total cost of which will not exceed $50,000. Is
this too much for the Michigan of today?
We cannot offer as an excuse that the amount has been kept
down by too modest statement of the sum each person has esti-
mated he could raise. That might be an explanation, if every man
had turned in a pledge; but the facts of the case are that hundreds
have failed to do so, that many fraternities and house clubs have
made no report whatever, and that the total could easily be brought
well above the quota if every man were taking his fair share of the
campaign's responsibility.
It is up to us to, take a long glance backward and forward -
backward, to a past in which loyalty and sacrifice combined to
bring the Union to its present stage; forward, to the immediate fu-
ture in which a completed building with one of the -best college
swimming pools in the country will stand as the monument to our
own good work. With a full realization of what this campaign
means to the University, we can make its success certain today.
Get a pledge card now at the cage in the Union lobby if you
have not signed; estimate your soliciting ability thereon in dollars
and cents;, and then get out the day you arrive in the home town
and make that estimate bear a' striking similarity to the well known
30 pennies.
Have we forgotten? Let's make it a ringing "No!"

HAVE MICHIGAN MEN FORGOTTEN?

HOUSE VOTES TO
REPEAL MAORIT
WARLEGISLATID
ADOPTS VOLSTEAD RESOLUTI
UNANLIOUSLY, AS
EXCEPTION
LEVER FOOD CONTROL
ACT INCLUDED IN BII
Republicans Assert Menari F
Step Toward Fulillment of
Campaign Pledge
Washington, Dec. 13. - Repeal
most of the war time laws was vo
today by the house, which adopi
the Volstead resolution for that P
pose, after two hours of debate. T
vote was unanimous, 323 votes be
recorded, in favor of the resolution
Before taking the final vote 1
house accepted an amendment p
viding for inclusion of the Lever ft
control act, among the laws wh
the resolution would repeal.
The resolution, which now goes
the senate, excepted from the rep
the trading with the enemy act, 1
war finance corporation act and
amendments, and measures deal
with the issue of liberty and vict4
bonds. The resolution declared
act of congress, that by its terms
in force only during the existence
the state of war and a limited ti
thereafter, shall be construed and
ministered as if the present war t
minated on the date when this
olution becomes effective."
The measure as adopted is prai
cally idetical with that passed
congress just before the adjornm
of the last session and vetoed
President Wilson.
Republican leaders of the house
serted tonight that adoption of I
measure was one of the first st
taken by the Republican majority
fulfill the campaign pledge to put'
country on a peace time basis.
CAEA-1NNOUNCES BOARD
REDUCTION NEXT MON1
MANGR. SAYS BOARDING HOUS
HAVE MADE AND MAKE
MONEY
Announcing a reduction in bo
rates after Christmas if the pres
downward trend of prices contin
the management of the Cutting e
yesterday challenged the statem
of boarding house operators who c
tend they have not and are not m
ing money.
Inquiry yesterday showed that
teria and board prices in Ann A
are still far from being uniform,r
that while somemhouses have redu
their rates, others have not; also t
some managers have promised a.
duction soon, while others see no z
sible chance for a decline before t
year.
"There is no reason why board
houses cannot reduce prices 60 ci
a week, and some of them even ma
after Christmas, if prices conti
coming down," said the manager
the Cutting cafe. "Although we h
a large stock of expensive can
goods on hand, nevertheless we
pect to pass on to the students
saving that we are now effecting

a great many food products."
Law Smoker at Union Tomorro
Musio by Nobe Wetherbee's orct
tra,. talks by faculty men and p
dents, smokes, cider and doughn
are on the program for the All-I
smoker which will be held at 7
o'clock tomorrow night In the Un
Tickets will be on sale In the co
dors of the Law building today.

KUBELIK DELIGHTFUL
IN CONCERT NUMBERS
(By S. B. C.) -
Jan Kubelik, violinist, renowned in
this country and in Europe, played in
Ann Arbor for the first time last night
in Hill auditorium. The artist and
his "Imperator" Stradivarius was the.
combination that brought sincere
pleasure to, those gathered to hear
him.
Kubelik lifted his audience out of
themselves and made them live to
the pulsing of his instrument. His
first number, "Concerto in D minor"
by Vieuxtemps began with a hymn-
like but plaintive movement, as if
the music were coming through a
great cathedral at twilight, and then
his bow sprang into the vigor of the
last movement.
"Romance," by Beethoven, was
brought out in such a way as to con-
vey a soft tenderness and at the same
time a majesty of movement. Next
followed- "Praeludium," by Bach, for
the violin alone, which showed Kube-
lik's skillful technique. The "Intro-
duction and Rondo Capriccioso" of
Saint Saens pulled the listener on
with its fascinating movement.
Pierre Augierias played the third
section of the program, Chopin's
"Ballade, No. 2, Op. 38," with a crisp-
ness of touch and sureness of render-
ing that brought a most enthusiastic
applause from the audience. The last
two numbers, Wieniawski's "Souvenir
de Moscow" and Paganini's "La Cam-
panella" showed Kubelik's mastery of
difficult passages and his pulsing vig-
or of rhythm.

TAKE CHRISTMAS
COLLECTION TODAY
Boxes will be placed at various
points about the campus today and
tomorrow to receive donations for
providing Christmas 'gifts for the
poor children of Ann Arbor and the
youngsters in the hospitals who have
no one to play Santa Claus for them.
The present action has been taken
in order that those on the campus
not affiliated with fraternities and
sororities may have an opportunity of
playing "good fellow." For some years
it has been the custom of these or-
ganizations to make a celebration for:
one or two poor children, for whom
they purchased clothing and a few
trinkets. Now everyone on the cam-
pus may help make Christmas mean
something for the poor children.
Jiedical Society
Tlakes Four M'en
Four senior medical students were
initiated into Alpha Omega Alpha,
national honorary medical fraternity,
at the banquet last night at the
Union.
The toastmaster for the occasion
was Dr. R. Bishop Canfield, and the
speakers included Dr. Udo J. Wile,
Dr. James G. Van Zwaluwenberg, and
Mr. Carl Mannuss, all of the Medical
school. The men received into the or-
ganization were William German,
Lyle Bacon, Robert Barney, and
Bruce Harris.

i

GRAND RAPIDS STUDENTS
All Michigan men students
from Grand Rapids, Michigan,
are requested to attend a meet-
ing at 7:15 o'clock Wednesday
evening in the smoking room
on the second floor of the Un-
ion. The purpose of this meet-
ing is to formulate plans for
campaigning among the Michi-
gan alumni in Grand Rapids for
money with which to complete
the Union swimming pool..

Underclass Committee Meets

European Children to Get Benefit
One-half the proceeds from the 4
o'clock matinee performance Wednes-
day afternoon at the Majestic thea-
ter will be donated to the Herbert
Hoover commission for Central Eu-
ropean children.

The underclass conduct
will meet at 7:15 o'clock
room 225, of the Union.

committee
tonight in

Special

Entertament

Auspices
of

Student Commiot4
on Athletic Affali

at

HILL

AUDITORIUM,

TONIGHT

ONL

TICKETS,50c. ON SALE AT STATE STREET STORES and ON THE CAMPUS

7:30 P.

Is

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