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December 08, 1920 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAIL_

,. ,

AlLY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1920.

Number 55.

the Deans:
There will be a meeting of the Deans this morning at 10 o'clock in the
e of the President.
Members of the Literary Faculty:
Cards for mid-semester reports on all students whose work is unsat-
etory.. have been placed in the various messengers' boxes. It is re-
ted that these reports be returned through the messenger system or
etly to the office by noon, Friday, Dec. 10, in order that they may be
i to advantage. JOHN R. EFFINGER.
dIrangle:
The next regular meeting of Quadrangle will be held Wednesday, Dec.
; 8 p. m., in the Quadrangle rooms. Prof. E. W. Dow will read a paper
'Where History Fits In."
H. P. SCOTT, Provost.
iomore Engineers:
The December Assembly will be held at 9 o'clock Weduesday, Dec. 8,
oom 348 of the New Engineering building. Professor Roth will ad-
s the class on a subject of interest and concern to all engineers.
W. C. HOAD, Class Mentor.
I Interpretations of Literature:
This afternoon at 4 o'clock in Room 205, Mason hall, the classes in
rpretlve Reading will give- a recital of miscellaneous poems. Those
rested are invited to attend.
R. D. T. HOLLISTER.

WIIATS GOING ON
WEDNESDAY
9:00-Sophomore engineer assembly
in room 348, Engineering building.
12:15-Triangles meet for group pic-
tures at Rentschler's studio.
0:00-Dinner fr all men of Ann Ar-
bor or the University at Lane hall
in honor of Dr. Frederick Griffin,
of Philadelphia.
7:00- Youngstown Michigan club
meets in room 325, Union.
7:00 r Glee club rehearsal in the
Workshop.
7 :00-Varsity band practice in Uni-
vrsity hal.
7 :15--Student council meets in room
306, Union.
7s:15-I andoln club rehearsal at the
UVnion.;.
7 15-Cabinet club meets in room 319,
Union.
7:15--Meeting of Intercollegiate Zion-
ist society in Lane hall.
7:30 - I Cireole Itallana meets In
Alumni Memorial hall. Prof. Her-
bert R. Cross will deliver an illus-
trated lecture on "Raphael.".
7 :80-Forestry club smoker, room F
214, Natural Science building.
7:30-Student council committee on
underclass conduct meets in the Un-
ion,.
7:30-Adelphi House of Representa-
tives meets on fourth floor, Univer-
sity hall.
7':45-Interfraternity swimming meet,
city Y. M. C. A.
8:00-Freshman dental smoker at the
Union.
THURSDAY
0s$0 -- Dr. Thomas Iden speaks on
"Science and the Bible," before Up-
per Room Bible class in Upper
Room, Lane hall.
7:00-Belding-Greenville club meets
in room 306, Union.
7:15-Pi Delta Epsilon meets at Un-
ion, the number of the room to be
posted on the lobby bulletin board.
7:15--La Sociedad Hispanica meets in
room 202, South Wing.
I:80-Sophomore lit smoker at the
Union.
7:30-Soph engineers smoker at the
Union.
3:80-PhI Sigma meets in room Z 231,
Natural Science building.
I:30-Meeting of Aristolochite in room
300, Chemistry building.
:30-Aero club meets in room 325,
Union.
7:80-C. W. Good speaks on "Re-
search in Carburation," before the
student branch of A. S. M. E. in
room 229, Engineering building.
:45-Interfraternity swimming meet
at city Y. M. C. A.
50--Junior it officers and charmen
of committees meet in Lane hall.
U-NOTICES
Lk who are interested in the forma-
tion of a University Rife club are
requested to meet at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in room 445, Engineering
building.
Phe ticket sales for the Glee and
Mandolin club minstrel show will be
conducted at the Union this week at
the following hours: Thursday.
2-q, 7-9; Friday, 9-12, 2-5; and Sat-
urday, 9-12 o'clock.
11 shriners who have not turned in1
their names to Prof. Frank A.
Mickle, 1031 Michigan avenue, sec-3
retary of the University Shrine club,
arn asked to do so at once.

EXPECT LARGE ATTENDANCE
AT ANNUAL AFFAIR AT ARMORY
Father Bourke will be toastmaster
at the annual Chamber of Commerce
dinner to be held at 6:15 o'clock to-
night at the Armory. Several hun-
dred persons are expected to attend
according to those in charge.
Prof. E. C. Goddard, of the law
school, will speak on "The Charter."
Professor Goddard is chairman of the
charter committee. Prof. David Fri-
day, of the economic department, will
speak on "The Future of Prices."
Prof. I L. Sharfman, also of the ec-
onomics department, will .talk on
"The Railroad Situation." George
Bowen, of the ScholsofnMusic, will
lead the community singing.
There will be a general discussion
following each talk.
SOPH LITS HAVE SURE CURE
FOR BLUES AT CLASS SMOKER
Jazz music, short but snappy talks,
smokes, drinks, and doughnuts are
all on the program which sophomore
lits have outlined for their first real
"get-together" smoker at the Union
at 7:30 Thursday night. Dean John
R. Effinger and sevral other faculty
members have been secured to ad-
dress the assemblage.
The musical end of the smoker will
be in the hands of "Nobe" Weather-
bee and his galaxy of jazz artists. Re-
ports from the committee in charge
indicate a large attendance, and it is.
urged that any soph lit who has wor-
ries on his mind attend this smoker'
and rid himself of all cares.
YPSILANTI TO HEAR LOUIS
GRAVEURE, BELGIAN BARITONE
Louis Graveure, the famous Belgian
baritone, will give a concert Thurs-
day evening, Dec. 9, in the Pease aud-
itorium, Ypsilanti. Mr. Graveure is
considered the first of living bari-
tones by the leading critics of this
country.
Mr. Graveure is a master vocalist
who has a sweet yet voluminous voice
which he uses with great artistry. It Is
rich, flexible, and full of color and
dramatic intensity. His diction in
English, French, and Italian is said
to be beyond praise, while his graps
of musical style is complete.
,24E WILL HAVE FIRST SMOKER
OF YEAR AT UNION SATURDAY
The first freshmen engineer smok-
er of the season will be held nextj
Saturday night at the Union. An ef-
fort is being made to get Dean Coo-
ley to address the meeting. Edward
J. Johns, '23, president of the sopho-
more engineers, will address the
Freshmen at the smoker.
A boxing match is being planned by
the entertainment committee and
further plans for the smoker will be
discussed today at the '24E assembly
which meets in University Hall at
11 o'clock this morning.
Engineers Hold Smoker Thursday
Sophomore engineers will hold their
first smoker at 7:30 Thursday night
in the Michigan Union. The speak-
er of the evening will be Rev. Lloyd
H. Douglass. A varied entertainment
has been arranged with well known
campus entertainers, plenty of jazzy
music, smokes and eats.
Read The Daily for Campus News.

PRES WILSON URES
TAX LW REVISION
(Continued from Page One)
"I do not feel it my privilege at
present to suggest the detailed and
particular method by which these ob-
jects may be attained, but I have faith
that the inquiries of your several com-
mittees will discover the way and the
method.
"The only recommendations for oth-
er than domestic matters was that
for a lon a to Armenia to be adminis-
tered through Americah commission-
ers "to avoid further tempting oppor-
tunities to revolutionary tendencies
in that country,". and for granting
independence in the Philippines "to
keep our promise to- the people of
these islands."
Immigration Bill
Aside from hearing the President's
message, Congress made definite on
at least one of the problems it faces,
during the brief session. The house
received a rule under which an ef-
fort will be made Thursday to take
up the immigration bill for prompt
action. It would limit general debate
to four hours. The two day interval
was allowed to permit Representative
Siegel, of New York, a member of the
immigration committee, to frame a
minority report.
The Johnson bill would prohibit
practically all immigration for two
years.
Senator King, Democrat of Utah, in-
troduced e, bill proposing to suspend
immigration for a period of six
months. This proposal has the sup-
port of senators who believe that con-
gress should not hastily pass immigra-
tion legislation, but should put up the
bars for a short period while it is
drafting permanent legis.lation.
NO RULES ISSUED
FOR HOLIDAY RENTS
Again with the approach of Christ-
mas vacation the old question of room
rents during the recess has arisen.
Because students do not make defi-
nite arrangements with their landla-
dies when securing their rooms, mis-
understandings have often broken out
with the advent of the holiday sea-
son.
"No rules have been decided upon
by the housing committee, the mat-
ter being left entirely to the stu-
dents and their landladies." This is
the statement made by Prof esso
Bursley, chairman of the housing
committee. He also said that he
thought it would be a fair proposition
to both if a half-rate was agreed
upon.
PRELIMINARY CAMPAIGN
FOR POOL STARTS TODAY
(Continued from Page One)
stantial amounts registered above the
signatures.
Request Early Report
Reports from the men working on
the preliminary pledge committee,
which starts the drive today, will be
received tonight and tomorrow night
at the Union. Fraternity and house
club representatives have been re-
quested to report the returns on the
pledge solicitation in their respective
houses as soon as possible in order
that Union officials may at all times
know how the campaign is progress-
ing.
The matter of pledge signing is to
be entirely optional. It is realized
that the man who signs under press-
ure will not do the work of solicita
tion when he gets home during the

vacation period. Moderation in stat.
ing the amount he will raise is asked
of every student in order that an ac-
curate estimate of the result of th e
drive may be made before the ten
leave town to start the work of so-
licitation.
For results ad.vertise in The Mich-
izan Dailv-Adv.
Ask for the
The Smart Looking, Popular Shoe
for CAMPU.1S
and CLASS ROOM
Ideal, All Round College Shoe
Same High Qjality as the
TOM LOGAN GOLF SHOE
If your dealer cannot supply you
write us for catalog and prices
THOMAS H.LOGAN COMPANY
Hudson, Mass.
Send for the Torn Logan Calendar,
which pictures, suitable for framing,
the International Golf match between
Ouimet, Ray and Vardou.

.
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Mtusic Students
To Give Recital
At 4:15 o'clock this afternoon ad-
vanced students of the piano and
voice departments of the University
School of Music will appear in a pub-
lic recital at the School of Music aud-
itorium.
The following program will be of-
fered:
By the Sea .................Arenskyl
Etude, Op. 10, No. 9..........Chopin
Mary Louise Maxwell
Sei Marta Nella Vita Mia......Costa
Kemp Keena
Sonata, Op. 10, No. 1......Beethoven
Allegro Molto-Adagio
Heath Walling
Thy Beaming Eyes.....MacDowell
The Sea .............Grant-Schaefer
Marjory Whelan
Etude, D fiat .................. Liszt
Violet Ingleright
Prologue from "Pagliacci".....
..................... Leoncavallo
Robert McCandliss
Love Dream ...................
Murmurings of the Forest......Liszt
Lillian M. Poundstone1
TOVEMBER ISSUE OF TECHNIC
APPEARS ON CAMPUS TODAY
The November issue of the Michigan
Technic will make its appearance on
the campus today, containing a va-
riety of topics, chief among which
are waterway projects and hydro-
electric development.
Ocean traffic from the St. Lawrence
to the Great Lakes, The Adventures
of Michigan Engineers in China,
Electrical Drafting, and the Power
Possibilities of the Great Lakes are
some of the interesting subjects cov-
ered.

AS SUBJECT FOR WINNING
MANUSCRIPT
First prize in the international prize
essay contest conducted by the In-
stitute of International Education
through its International Relations
clubs in all important universities of
this country has been won by Helen
Bailey, '21. Announcement of her
success was received yesterday morn-
ing by Miss Bailey from Stephen P.
Duggan, director of the Institute of
International Education at New York
City.
"Shantung, an International Prob-
lem," was the subject of the essay
which carried away the first prize of
$100. Judges in the contest were
Prof. Harry E. Barnes, of Clark uni-
versity, Prof. A. C. Flick, of Syracuse
university, and Prof. Harry J. Car-
man, of Columbia university.
Manuscript 5,000 Words Long
Miss Bailey, who attended Frank-
lin college for the last three years,
was requested by Dean Henry Sher-
wood, head of the history department
of Franklin college, to enter a man-
uscript in the contest. The invitation
was accepted and Miss Bailey spent
the greater part of last summer pre-
paring material for her essay. Thirty-
six magazine articles and several
books on the Shantung question were
read, and a manuscript of 5,000 words
was handed to the judges last Sep-
tember.
In her essay Miss Bailey has dis-
cussed the expediency of Shantung
being given to China, concluding that

HELEN AILE 21, FIRST
IN. PRIZE ESSAY CONTEST'

CHOOSES SHANTUNG

:,

yENUS
F the student or
rivals all for perfect pencil
work. 17 Iblack degrees and
3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
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QUESTION

it is right that China be given the
territory as it is an integral part of
the country.
Enterod University This Fall
"If the United States forces Japan
te give Shantung to China there will
be a serious situation," said Miss Bai-
ley yesterday, "for England and
France will not back this country be-
cause of secret treaties. The Par
Eastern question is the one big ques-
tion of the day for when China
awakes she will be a great power."
Miss Bailey, whose home is in
Franklin, Indiana, entered the Uni-
versity this fall, having pursued work
at Franklin college for the last three
years. She is a resident of Martha
Cook dormitory, and a member of the
Michiganensian staff and of Masques.
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.
Read Th Daily for Campus News.

PERSONAL GREETING CARDS
Leave Your Order Early - Special Attention Given to
CHRISTMAS ENGRAVING at

RS5

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

F'. . I

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OF
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Wednesday, Thursday and Friday Evenings=
Dec. 15-16-17I
DIRECTION OF
E. MORTIMER SHUTER -WIS. B. WHEELER FRANK, L. THOMAS .
ha
ALL SEATS RSEVE
BOX OFFICE SALE, MICHIGAN UNION LOBBY a
THURSDAY, DEC. 9-2-5 and 7-9; FRIDAY, DEC. 10-
9-12 and 2-5; SATURDAY, DEC.. 11---9-12
PRICES
ENTIRE LOWER FLOOR, BOX SEATS AND
FIRST FOUR ROWS IN THE BALCONY5
BAL. OF BALCONY $1.00
NO WAR TAX Ia
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