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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 08, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG

4, L

.. _
.,
I

w GEORGE IL NAYLORt
RESIGNS FROM FACULTY
)r. George Irving Naylor, '111H, has
igned as assistant professor of
ito-urinary surgery in the Homoeo-
hic Medical school in order to ac-
>t the position of chief surgeon in
LOw general hospital at Johnstown,
T V T
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

Pa. Dr. Naylort was elected to the
American- College of Surgeons at Its
last meeting in Montreal. Dr. Naylor
was also recorder in the Homoeo-
pathic hospital.
For live progressive trp-to-date ad-
vertising use The Michigan Daily.-
Adv.

iECHER, RENT
MUST COOPERATE;

I

Home of Sweet and Purity
Always Fresh

802 S. Main

Phone 474-W

'I .' .-

For

STUDY LAMPS

and all kinds of

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES

go to

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

PHONE 273

200 WASHINGTON ST.

"Sophistieation" Can Be Eliminated
Only in This Way Says
Prof. Whitney
"Elimination of that element of
sophistication in our high schools
which Mr. Miller speaks of, can only
be accomplished by a real cooperation
on the part of the teachers and par-
ents of the pupils to discourage the
evil," said Prof. Allen S. Whitney of
the education department, of-the con-
ditions described by Edwin L. Miller,
principle of Northern High school of
Detroit, in an address which he gave
in Detroit last week.
Students Worldly
Discussion in newspapers of the
speech of Mr. Miller, has brought out
statements which show that such-con-1
ditions in other high schools of the
state are, in many of them, similar to1
those in Northern High, though not so
aggravated. Sophisticated, worldly,
and overdressegI high school children,
were what Mr. iller-denounced.
"Action. such as that taken by the
Tirls of the Ann Arbor High school
would heip immensely toward a solu-
tion of the problem," saidProfessor
~Whitney. "After having heard Miss
Grace Greenwood, social director of
Martha Cook dormitory speak to them
on present conditions, they passed a
resolution to cease and otherwise dis-
courage the objectionable forms of
dancing, and extravagant dress.
Teachers Must Help
"Neither may the teachers shirk
their duty. It is their place to help
in developing that cooperation be-
tween the parents, the children and
themselves which will raise the stand-
ards in the high schools. Such co-
iperation will, in time, eradicate all
the conditions Mr: Miller speaks of.
hs a matter of fact, I believe he is
right to a considerable extent, in that
the high schools throughout the state
really need action of some kind."
Prof. Calvin O. Davis of the educa-
tion department also believes the con-.
ditions in the state warrant action.
although, he states, he considers that
the schools of the larger cities are
more in need of it than those of the
smaller places.
Universtty Reflected
"The real solution of the matters of
extravagant dress, and frivolity among
the high school students lies right
here at the University, in my opinion,"
said Professor Davis. "I think that
the attitude of University students is
reflected by the high schools of the
tate in a high degree. although often
exaggerated and distorted.
"Action by University students and
:aculty to discourage the things here
which are seen to such a degree in the
:high schools would have the desired
effect, I believe. Resolutions, actual
moderation in actions and perhaps,
considerable advertising of the real
work done by University students, and
less of their other interests, would
end the present problem."

DOUGLAS LAE STAION
CIVES FINE, RESULTS~
"One hundred contributions to sci-
ence have been made in the last
twelve years by some of the leading
professors and students of this.coun-
try, due to the excellent facilities for
research work in natural science of-
fered by the biological station at
Douglas Lake," says Prof. George R
La Rue of the zoological department.
Professor La Rue went on to say
that because of its location in the
transition zone, where the flora and
fauna of both the south and north
regions are found, the station offers
opportunities for combining most effi-
ciently the theoretical and practical
study of plants, animals, and birds,
while for research work in animal
parasites the station is unsurpassed.
The present site of the biological
station has long been considered un-
satisfactory and the quarters wholly
inadequate. In order to remove the
I aboratories to a more advantageous
site and to erect modern equipment
' the University -is asking for $40,000
from the state legislature.

THE BANK OF SERVICE
Commercial Banking in all its Branches.
Savings Department and Safety Deposit Vaults.
Exchange ok All Parts of the World.
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks.
FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $825,000.00
Resources .........$5,00@,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

SUGAR BOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
ETERUYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES

I.

t

I CE CRLEA
The entire personnel of our
Ann Arbor branch is eager to
render service.

ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

SCHOOL
OF DANCING
If you can walk, you can dance
after four private lessons with
MLLE.
JEANETTE KRUSZKA
OR
PHILIP MILLER, '23
LET US PROVE THE FACT
For Appointment Call
PHONE 2308-R
Between Hours '12-2
OR AT THE STUDIO
824 E. HURON
Two Blocks West of High School

fk-- - - .1, 1 momw

IANOitp EW LERS
SNEAoh p A5 sYF

Christmas Gifts Suggestions
Strings of Pearls 18 to 30 inches
Priced at' $10.00 to $40.00.
Ladies Wrist Watches $15 to $75.
Schianderer &Seyfried
113 E. Liberty Street
Anj Arbor Michigan

.1

I.

Pers

orasauur rt a dur nuinlrnai ril II I III If I IIIII I il l I I
Make Your Selection
T o da y
of
anal Greeting Cards
and
Narcissus Bulbs
Slater Book Shop
30 334 S. State St.

"EANERS
PRESSkS
] 2
des Pary Gowns a Specially
IN THREE WEEKS
HRISTMS WILL BE
HERE
Your thoughts are already turn-
ing towards those Yuletide fes-
tivities to come.
But will you be able to partici-
pate in them? When the even-
ing lights are glowing and all
are making merry, will you be
able to sing and dance with the
rest? Or must you sit idly by,
v atching the others enjoy them-
selves?
I can's; teach you to sing, but, I
will guarantee to teach you to
dance perfectly by Xmas, if you
see me at once.
LE VERNE M.
HALSEY'S
STUDIOS
Hours: 1-5 - 7.10
Wuerth Arcade - Ann Arbor

101-108 So. Main St.

Member of the Federal Reserve System.

880 So. State St., (Niekels Arcade)

Extraordinary

$2vO00

Exactly as illustrated, made of fine
kid, -flexible welt goles, miph an4 on
heels, medium round toe, ith tip.
over combination last, fitting snugl
close at arch and around ankle.
Priced within reason and warranted fo

44
4 ar

black
ne-halt
Made
ly and
r service

J

The,
Phone 4

'A

FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS OF

EVERY DESCRIPTION

FOR VICTROLAS & VICTOR RECORDS
FOR THE BEST STRINGS, REPAIR
PARTS AND ALL ACCESSORIES

BIG TNCR R SE TN
SPANISH CLASSES
Two hundred and twelve more stu-
'dents are enrolled in the Spanish de-
nartment at the present time than last
year, according to a recent report.
One thousand one hundred and twen-
ty-eight students in all are pursuing
the study of Spanish this year, morel
than 916 in 1919, the increase in the
number of hours being 812.
French shows a slight falling off.
One thousand eight hundred and
eighty students are now taking the
latter language as compared with
f1.896 last year.
Only 400 students areenrolled in
German classes, and! according to a.
prominent language professor, it is
not possible to forecast the time when
it will come back to its pre-war posi-
tion, although it will gradually regain
respect as a subject of study and find
its way into University programs.
Few University students are study-
ing Italian. In the opinion of Prof. A.
G. Canfield of the French department.
this language will remain in Univer-
pities because of the great Italian civ-
ilization, and because of the fact that
Dante was a native of Italy, but the
study of the language will not be made
a part of high school curriculums be-
cause business relations with Italy are
not great.
The table of enrollment in the Lan-
onage department since 1914 follows:
1914: French 680, Spanish 202, Ger-
man 1.218; 1915: French 740, Spanish
421, German 1,118; 1916: French, 783.
Spanish 676, German 1,141; 1917:
French 897, Spanish 605, German 584 ;
1918: French 1,262, Spanish 341, Ger-;
man 153; 1919: French 1,896, Spanish
916, German 303; 1920; French 1,880.
Spanish 1,128, German 400.

Walk-Over Boat Shop
115 South Main Street

A

The J'ash ion Shoppe

mmrr -- -

Camouflage-

Yes!

But Just Try' Us

SEE

SCHAEBERLE & SON, MUSIC HOUSE

DOWN TOWN

Prices Right

110 S. MAIN ST.

109 West Liberty

Phone 474R

9

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