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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 08, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-08

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WEATHER.

CLOUDY AND COLDER
I TODAY

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ASSOCIAT]
PRESS

D~AY AM)MNIHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOU. XXXI. No. 5. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

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NEW CLAUSE FOR
HOME RULE BILL
AGIN PROPOSED
HOUSE OF LORDS WOULD CHANGE
FORM OF BILL FOR IRELAND'S
SELF RULE
OPPOSE ROYAL POWER
OVER IRISH HOUSE
Marquis of Salisbury Criticizes Safe-
guards Respecting Oath
of Allegiance
London, Dec. 7.-The government
was again defeated in the house of
lords last night when an amendment
proposing a new clause to the Irish
Home Rule Bill, offered by the Mar-
quis of Salisbury, was carried 51
to 50.
This amendment provides that
neither the northern nor the south-
era parliament, shall be established
under the king's authority; that the
protection of the rights and liberties
of all persons in both northern and
southern Ireland be fully assured,
and that otherwise the appointed day
for putting the act in force be fixed
by resolution of the imperial parlia-
ment.
Criticises Safeguards
In moving his new clause, the Mar-
quis of Salisbury criticized the safe-
guards in the bill respecting the oath
of allegiance and the proposed crown
colony system of administration in
the event of either parliament not
functioning.
Lord Birkenhead, lord chancellor,
declared the government could not
accept the amendment, as the govern-
pient's own proposals contained ade-
quate securities.
Senate for South
The general belief was expressed
that some of the changes as made
would not be persisted in. It is ex-
pected that the proposal to substi-
tute a joint session of senates for the
Irish council will not be pressed, and
belief was expressed that the gov-
ernment would agree to establish a
senate for the South if not for the
North of Ireland.
PLANS PROGRESSING FOR
CHRISTMAS CHRITY WORK
LIST NAMES OF NEEDY CASES;
MOTTO IS CONSERVATIVE
BTYING
"This year we should be careful to
trust to those people who know the
needy families," said Thomas S.
Evans, secretary of the Student
Charities association at the meeting
held yesterday to arrange the annual'
entertainment given to poor children'
by the fraternities and sororities.
Lists of deserving cases have been
compiled by three representatives of
charitable organizations, and the'
names of these children were given
out at the meeting. The main pur-
pose this year is for the fraternities
and sororities to be conservative in
buying.
Dinner Optional
Organizations are requested not to
take the children down town but to
get the clothes by measurement after
seeing them. It is thought that this
will eliminate expenditure. Taking.

the children to dinner is optional.
Hutzel's and Goodyear's have offer-
ed the best prices on clothes for the
girls and Allmand and Forsythe for
shoes. Stores offering prices on boys'
clothing will be announced in The1
Daily in a few days.
Men's Shirts Needed
Contributions will be taken on the,
campus in a short tiem for a party'
and entertainment to be given in Lane4
hall under the auspices of those stu-1
dents who cannot take part in the,
organization benefits. The Women's
league will furnish a program and;
there will be music from the Union.
The social service department ofl
the hospitals has great need for+
men's shirts. Fraternities are asked
to collect all the old shirts they can.
to be distributed among the invalids.
These will be collected by trucks on
Dec.. 20, along with the Christmas
trees and toys from fraternity par-
ties.

IF YOU ARE A MICHIGAN MAN--

Tonight or tomorrow night a member of the committee to raise funds
for the Union swimming pool will visit you to enlist your help in the va-
cation campaign.
Michigan will expect you to tell him you will do your best; that you
will approach every alumnus and friend in your home town whom you
know or with whom you can get in touch, tell him of the University's great
need for the pool, and ask him to contribute.
You will be asked to give an estimate of the amount you believe you
can raise - a very conservative estimate, so that a fairly accurate concep-
tion may be gained of the progress of the drive.
Every means for making these tentative pledges accurate will be placed
in your hands. You can secure information regarding the financial status
of the various alumni from Homer Heath, general manager of the Union,
today.
When you have made your pledge, you will be bound only as aMichi-
gan man to carry it out. Upon your loyalty and your success will de-
pend the immediate provision of one of the finest swimming pools in Amer-
ican universities for the Union, and along with it the raising of Michigan
swimming to the rank of a Varsity sport, with Conference competition as
the next step.
Twenty-one teams, a total of more than 200 men, will be given lists
of 20 men apiece, and thereby will be formed the largest committee which
ever went out for the achievement of a Michigan campaign. The sum
pledged has already reached more than $4,000. Are you ready to take part
as a member of this great committee, and to bring this total to the final
goal of $50,000? Then greet the solicitor this afternoon with a conservative
estimate of the amount you honestly believe you can raise, and then -
RAISE IT!
PRELIMINARY CAMPAIGN FOR POOL
STARTS AMONG STUDENTS TOAY

Four Jiedic Seniors
Given High Honors
Four seniors from the medical class
of the University have been elected
to membership in Aplha Omega Al-
pha, national Honorary Medical so-
ciety. Those accorded this distinction
are: Bruce Alexander Harris, Wil-
liam McKee German, Lyle Cholwell
Bacon, and Robert Ethebert Barney.
Both Harris and German are local
boys. Bacon is from St. Paul, Minn.,
and Barney is from Cleveland, Ohio.
SPOTLIGHT PLAYS
TORECORD CROWD
Jazz, Terpsichore and Humor Vie with
Hypnotism for Chief Honors on
Program
UNION ORCHESTRA IN DEBUT
OF SEASON, SCORES SUCCESSI
"Standing room only," could have
been the sign hung out at Hill audi-
torium last night, for the Spotlight
vaudeville played to a record break-
ing house. Varied as were the acts,
from classical music to the latest pop-
ular hits, humor and hypnotism, the
audience liked every one, and fre-
quently thundered applause and]
whistled for encores.
Robert F. Deebach, '23D, in "Hypno-
tism," defied all natural laws and
hypnotized his victims by wholesale.{
At one time he had 15 volunteers from
the audience under the spell, and pre-
vailed upon them to orate, shadow
box, dance, fish and generally keep the,

'PRESIDENT WILSON URGES NATIONAL
ECONOMY AND TAX LAW REVISION
IN ANNUAL MESSAGE TO CONGRESS,

DUES NOW PAYABLE
Hours for the payment of sen-
ior lit class dues are: Wednes-
day morning, 9 to 10 o'clock, and
in the afternoon from 2 to 4
o'clock. All of the class dues
should be paid by the end of the
week.
Freshman lit dues will be pay-
able this week in Unverity
hall from 1 to 2 o'clock on Wed-
nesday; 9 to 10 o'clock on Fri-
day, and 11 to 12 o'clock on
Thursday and Saturday.
I -
Abel '2oA Wins
Ilinstrel Show
Poster Contest
L. A. Abel, '20A, submitted the win-
ning drawing in the contest for the
Glee and Mandolin club minstrel
show poster and program cover.
Abel's poster, which depicts two gro-
tesque black face minstrels against
a fantastic background, was selected
from six drawings submitted by cam-
pus artists.
This poster marks the first to em-
ploy a two-color cut in publicity for
a campus production other than the
Union opera. The quality of the
drawings submitted caused long delib-
eration before the final award was
made.
Tickets for the minstrel show which
will be given Wednesday, Thursday,
and Friday of next week at the Whit-
ney theater, will be on sale at the
Union tomorrow, Friday, and Satur-
day.
ANNOUNCE 1-HOP WILL
BE0HELD NEXT SPING
APRIL S SET AS DATE FOR AN.
NUAL SOCIAL AFFAIR
OF JUNIOR CLASS
Friday, April 8, has been selected
as the date for the annual J-hop by
the hop committee which met for the
first time yesterday.
There will be 500 tickets put on
sale, the same as in former years.
While there was some discussion at
the meeting as to what the price of
the tickets will be, no decision, it
was stated, could be reached before
more tangible plans concerning the
affair are complete.
The following committee heads
have been named by the general
chairman: Decorations, Edward T.
Ives, '22; invitations and program,
E. H. Fox, '22E; reception, Paul
Moore, '22M; music and entertain-
ment,, R. Jerome Dunne, '22; public-
ity manager, Harry C. Willson, '22L.
There will be -another meeting be-
fore the Christmas holidays.

Pledg'e Solcitors Will Sign Up Huge
Committee for Work During
Holidays
CHAPIN, '03, WATKINS, '04. ASK
FOR SUBSCRIPTION CARDS

Formation of the mammoth com- audience in constant Ill-concealed
mittee which will embrace every man laughter.
on the campus and which will be Dunphy Hypnotised
utilized for raising the funds for the To submit to the most thrilling of
Union swimming pool starts today Deebach's actions, was the experience
with the official opening of the pre- of Herbert Dunphy, '23. To the tune
liminary pledge drive. The 30 teams, of mournful piano music, and hollow
which are to obtain the pledges, have voiced pleadings of the hypnotist.
been appointed and all the men of the Dunphy's arm was piereced by six
University have been covered in the needels, which drew neither blood nor
assignment lists which the teams have! pain.
received. In a number of saxaphone selec-
Each team member will call upon tions, Myron E. Chon, '23, made a de-
the students on his list and will ex- Cided hit with the audien^e and had to
plain to them the idea of the cam- respond to three encores. His com-
paign. The students will register on plete mastery of the instrument was
the pledge cards the amounts they generally acknowledged and appreci-
stand ready to raise during the holi- ated.
days, and thus register as members Walter, Schemm, Star
of the huge committee which is to J. Lorenzo Walter, '23, and George
scatter to all parts of the country A. Schemm, '23, in "Tidbits of Chatter
on Tuesday, Dec. 21, to get the money and Song," ;drew more hearty laughs
for the pool. than any other act. Taking the black
Many Call on Heath face part, Walter made jibes at local
Indicating the spirit in which the characters and pointed comments on
campaign has been received on the his teammate, Schemm, and "her" ac-
campus, more than 100 men who are tions for the latter took the woman's
not members of the preliminary part in admirable fashion.
"Chalk Talk," by J. C. Brown, '23,
pledge committee have already call- wanot aney t othe acts
ed on Homer Heath, general mana- Portrayng familiar campus charact-
ger of the Union, for the purpose of rtraifmiarcampuscaract
ers in rapid manner, he sustained his
getting information in regard to alum- drawings by continual humor while ht
ni of the University that reside inIwork.
their home towns. Due to his long Playing popular music, in which
association with the University and # nothing but the "jazz" of moaning
the Union, Heath has had opportuni-I saxophones, blended cornet and
ty to come in contact with a great trombone notes, perhaps never to be
number of the alumni and he is de-' repeated was featured, George Rogers
sirous that the men on the big coin- and his six-piece novelty orchestra
mittee make use of the knowledge were forced to yield to several en-
that he has obtained in this way. cores.
Roy D. Chapin, '03, whose gift to Orchestra Plays
the pool fund of $1,000 was announc- The Union orchestra, playing the
ed last week, has requested a number first and final numbers, made its sea-
of pledge cards from the Union for son's debut at the performance. Its
the purpose of doing his bit to help overature, "Morning, Noon and Night
the work along in Detroit. James in Vienna," proved very popular.
Watkins, '04, also of Detroit, who was "I wish to thank all who assisted
in the city this week, took home with in any way to make the Spotlight a
him a pack of the cards which he success," said Peirce McLouth, '21E
promised to return with some sub- general chairman, last night, and each
(Continued on Page Eight) man is entitled to the greatest credit."

'I

DAILY WILL ISSUE
DIRECTORY SUPPLEMENT
The Michigan Daiy, following
its usual custom, will compile a
supplement to the oficial Stu-
dents' Directory, for the benefit
of those students who enrolled
late in the University, and to
correct unavoidable errors and
changes in the regular edition.
Name, class, Ann Arbor ad-
dress, home town, and Ann Ar-1
bor phone number, in the order,
named, should be placed on aJ
one cent post card and mailed
to the Directory Editor, The
Daily, Press building, City.
CHASE S, OSBORN
SPEAKS SUNDAY
Former Governor and Regent on Pro-
gram for Fourth University
Service of Year
WELL KNOWN AS SCIENTIST,
PUBLICIST AND EXPLORER
Chase S. Osborn, former governor]
of Michigan and regent of the Uni-
eversity, will speak next Sunday night1
in Hill auditorium at the fourth Uni-+
versity Service of the year.
Probably one of the most striking
if not the most striking figure in the
state, Mr. Osborn will speak from a
knowledge of life in all its vagaries
that few men can boast. Born in
1860, in the wilds of Indiana, he lived
near the place of Abraham Lincoln's
birth and a life which had much in
common with that of Lincoln.
After a childhood lived in all the
rough circumstances of-a poor boy of
those days, Mr. Osborn attended the
University of Purdue, and from there
went into newspaper reporting. Aft-
er working in many capacities in this
line, he bought a newspaper, and has,
since 1883, been the publisher of many
articles.
An extensive traveler, Mr. Osborn
has been to all corners of the globe,
and has explored many formerly un-
known tracts in Africa and other
countries. Equally well known in the
field of science, Mr. Osborn is a sci-
entist of repute, being the only Amer-
ican member of the Madagascar
Academy of Science.
He is best known to the people of
this state as a publisher, former state
game and fish warden, discoverer of
the Moose Mountain iron range, for-,
mer commissioner of railroads, Re-~
gent of the University and governor.
Of a powerful, compelling personali-
ty, and brilliant mind, Mr. Osborn has
a wide reputation as an orator and,
is expected by those in charge to pre-
sent a message of power to his audi-
ence Sunday night.
BURTON SPEAKUR
FOR CONVOCATION
President Marion L. Burton will ad-
dress the convocation of all Univer-
sity students to be held in Hill audi-
torium at 4:30 o'clock Friday after-
noon, Dec. 17. He will present to the
students matters of vital importance
to the entire institution with a view to
securing the fullest possible co-oper-
ation and mutual understanding be-
tween the University administration
and its students, according to the
statement of Mr. O. L. Buhr, assistant
to the President.

Owing to the limited seating cap-
acity of the auditorium, members of
the faculty and staff will be asked not
to attend the convocation. All stu-i
dents will be urged to be present.

CONFINES HIMSELF ALMOST
WHOLELY TO DOMESTIC
QUESTIONS
LEAGUE OF NATIONS
NOT ONCE MENTIONED
Industrial Situation, Predicament of
Farmer Finds Place in Ex.
ecutive's Paper
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 7.-Both houses
of congress were in brief session to-
day to hear President Wilson's an-
nual mesage. It was read by the
clerk, Mr. Wilson having heeded the
advice of his physician not to appear
in person.
Mr. Wilson confined himself almost
wholely to domestic questions. Only
by inference did his message refer to
the nearing close of his administration
and that was in the concluding par-
agraph.
"I have not so muen," the President
wrote, "laid before you a series of
recommendations, as sought to utter
confession of the faith in which I was
bred and in which it is my solemn
purpose to stand by until my last
fighting day."
Industrial Situation
The industrial situation, as well as
the predicament of the farmer, found
place in the President's message. Re-
oovery from the war effects gives
promise of early completion "only in
our own country," Mr. Wilson wrote,
and even here "halts and is impeded
at times." A program of "immediate-
ly serviceable acts of legislation," to
aid that recovery, "through the inde.
structable recuperative force of a
great government of the people,"
should be undertaken, Mr. Wilson
wrote, adding: "One of these is to
prove that a great democracy can
keep house as successfully and in as
business like a fashion, as any other
government."
First among the recommended step
President Wilson placed enactment of
a "workable budget system." e
said he had vetoed the budget ill
passed at the last session "reluc ant-
ly" and because of "a constitutional
objection"; but as it was later revised-
in the house, he believed it would ulti-
mately furnish "the basis for a na-
tional budget system." M. Wilson
cited figures as to the national debt
and urged "rigid economy in which
all branches of the government would
co-operate."
Urges Economy
"I cannot over emphasize," he
wrote, "the necessity of economy in
government appropriations and ex-
penditures and the avoidance by con-
gress of those acts which take mon-
ey from the treasury by indefinite or
revolving fund appropriation."
The President reviewed some of the
recommendations he made at the
opening of the last session and add
ed:
(Continued on Page Eight)
ORATORICAL SS'N SEEKS
SPEAKER FOR OPEN DAE
DEATH OF POWERS LEAVES DEC.
18 VACANT ON LECTUkE
PROGRAM
Due to the recent death of Leland
T. Powers, who was to have spoken
in Ann Arbor on the evening of ec.
18, that date on the program of the
Oratorical association is now vacant.
The association is doing everything
in its power to obtain another speak-
er for this engagement, but so, far

no one -has been found to fill the va-
cancy.
Leland T. Powers was born at Put-
neyville, N. Y., in 1857. He was ed-
ucated at the Boston University
School of Oratory. He graduated
from the latter school in 1880. In
1904 he founded the Boston School
of the Spoken Word, of which he was
head at the time of his death. He has
published two books, one In collabo-
ration with his wife, Carol Hoyt Pow-
ers, called Fundamentals of Expres-
sion, and another called Talks on Vx-
pression.

t

Prices Of Foodstuffs Continue To
Decrease; Butter, Jilk Take Fall

Following the general tendency for
falling prices in food stuffs, milk and
'butter prices were cut by local deal-
ers yesterday. The Ann Arbor Dairy
company led in the reduction, quoting
butter at a lower figure than other dis-
tributors.
The new milk rate, as announced1
by the Ann Arbor Dairy company re-
duces the retail price of a quart from
15 to 14 cents. The wholesale price
was cut from 13 to 12 cents. A case
of 20 half pints is now selling for 70
cents, instead of the previous price
of 75 cents. This is three and a half

cents a bottle. Restaurants and lunch
rooms have been selling these bottles
for seven and a half cents.
Butter, which has been decreasing
for several weeks, continued on its
downward course. The lowest quota-
tion, obtained from the Ann Arbor
Dairy company early yesterday aft-
ernoon placed good creamery butter
on sale at 58 cents retail and 53 cents
wholesale. Leading stores and whole-
sale houses whose butter rates were
higher, ranging from 60 to 68 cents,
explained that they could not lower
their prices until they bought a new
supply leer in the week.

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STUDENT COUNCIL TO MEET

The Student council's weekly
meeting will be held at 7:15
o'clock tonight in room 306 of
the Union.

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