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December 05, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-05

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SECTION

p r Si

aitx

ASOCIATED
PRESS
ESA'!:AND) NIGHT hIRE
SERVICE

ONE

VOL. XXXI. No. 53. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

" s

{DETROITAUMNI
APPROVE BUDGET
OF U1NIVERSITY
UNANIMOUS SUPPORT VOTED AT
BIG COME - BACK
SMOKER
NEW CONCRETE STAND
STRONGLY ENDORSED
Recommend Plan for Building Com.-
plete "U" to Board in Control
of Athletics
(Special to The Daily)
A resolution urging the governor
and Wayne county representatives in
the state legislature to do their ut-
most to secure the passage of the pro-
posed $8,690,000 budget was given
unanimous approval by the Detroit
alumni last night at their come-back
smoker in honor of the Varsity, re-
serves, freshman team and coaches.
Plans calling for the completion of
the stadium which will seat 42,500
were almost unanimously endorsed
at this time.
"The Detroit alumni earnestly and
respectfully urge Gov. A. J. Groes-
beck and the Wayne county delegates
as senators and representatives in
the state legislature to vote and work
for the passage of the appropriation,
requested by the Board of Regents
and President Marion L. Burton," was
the resolution, readily accepted by
the alumni' who crowded the Board
of Commerce auditorium last night.
James M. Watkins, chairman of the
meeting, called for a vote on three
plans for the proposed stadium. The
third plan, for building a complete
concrete "U," was overwhelmingly
adopted.
WOLERIN E BATTES FOR
NXT YEARANNOUNCED
(Special to The Daily)
Chicago, Dec. 4 .- Dates for Mich-
igan's football, baseball and track
schedules for 1921 were announced
at today's meeting of athletic direct-
ors and coaches of the Big Ten in the
Auditorium hotel.
The number of football games was
kept at seven, and a Conference rule
aws adopted requiring football play-
ers to wear numbers,
Will Play Wisconsin
With the exception of the substi-
tution of a football game with Wis-
consin instead of Chicago, the Wolver-
ine Conference gridiron schedule re-
mains the same as last year. The
complete schedule follows: Oct. 8,
Case at Ann Arbor; Oct. 15, M. A. C.
at Ann Arbor; Oct. 22, Ohio State at
Ann- Arbor; Oct. 29, Illinois at Urba-
na; Nov. 5, unfilled; Nov. 12, Wiscon-
sin at Madison; Nov. 19, Minnesota
at Ann Arbor.
Wide Range in Baseball
The baseball schedule opens with
the Purdue game on April 23 at Ann
Arbor. The complete schedule fol-
lows, April 23, Purdue at Ann Ar-
bor; April 30, Notre Dame at South
Bend; May 2, Purdue at Lafayette;
May 7, Chicago at Ann Arbor; May
11, M. A. C. at Lansing; May 14, Iowa

at Ann Arbor; May 16, Ohio at Co-
lumbus; May 18, Notre Dame at Ann
Arbor; May 2, Chicago at Chicago;
May 23, Iowa at Iowa City; May 27,
Ohio at Ann Arbor; May 28, Illinois
at Ann Arbor; May 30, Wisconsin at
Ann Arbor; June 1, M. A. C. at Ann
Arbor; June 4, Illinois at Urbana;
June 6, Wisconsin at Madison; June
29 and 29, Waseda at Ann Arbor.
Cornell to Come
The track schedule includes the
foilowing events: March 5, Illinois
relays at Urbana; March 19, Confer-
ence meet at Evanston; March -26,
Cornell at Ann Arbor; April 23,
Drake relays at Des Moines; May
7, Ohio at Columbus; May 14, 1111-
nois at Urbana; May 21, Chicago at
Ann Arbor; June 4, Conference meet
at Chicago.
THE WEATHER
Probably Snow or Rain; No Change
in Temperature

300 STUDENTS FROM
AT RECEPTION

MANY NATIONS BISHOP WILL TALK
IN PR SIDENT'S HOME AT CHURCH DINNER

Right Rev. John M. McCormick, bis-
Men and wmen of many nations and the others were the personal hop of Western Michigan, who is ap-
rubbed elbow a and formed new property of Chinese students. pearing here at the Episcopal fellow-
friendships last night at the home of The South Africans also had a room ship dinner, which will be held at
President and Mrs. Marion L. Bur- full of exhibits, consisting of every- 5:30 o'clock Tuesday evening in the
ton, at their reception to foreign stu- thing from skins to gold ore and an- assembly hall of the Union, has ap-
dents of the University. Flags of the telope-horn canes. Many articles of peared before student organizations
nations and native costumes of the interest from the Philippines were here a number of times.
assembled students, together with the placed out for inspection. Prof. Morris P. Tilley, of the Eng-
foreign exhibits and settings trans- During the evening refreshments lish department, will act as toast-
formed the interior of the President's were served and a short musical pro- master for the event and Albert
home into a cosmopolitan curio shop. gram, consisting of numbers from Jacobs, '21, will be the other speaker
Despite the inclement weather more foreign lands, was given. on the program.
than 300 persons were in attendance. According to the persons in charge

CONFERENCE COACHES ARRA NGE 1921.
FOOTBALL SCHEDULES; MICHIGAN NOT
TO PLAY CHICAGO URING NEXT YEAR

In addition to the students and their
wives a number of the deans, accom-
panied by their wives, also were pres-
ent.
One of the interesting features of
the reception was the series of ex-
hibits arranged by students from Ja-
pan, China, South Africa and the
Philippines. In the Japanese room a
veritable Japanese garden was con-
structed. The setting, which of course
included an abundance of . cherry
blossoms, served as a background for
the exhibit of iuany Japanese curios.
In the Chines" parlor many tapes-
tries, articles of furniture and curios,
some of great age and value, were
displayed. A number of the articles
in this room were from the museum
NOTED LECTURER WL
TALK HERE TOMORROW

DR.

GRIFFIN OF PHILADELPHIA
TO SPEND THREE DAYS
IN ANN ARBOR

Dr. Frederick Griffin, of Philadel-
phia, who is lecturing throughout the
country on present day subjects, will
be in Ann Arbor for three days, be-
ginning Monday. The lecturer is
touring under the auspices of the
Unitarian Layman's league, which is
a confederation of the laymen of the
Unitarian and other liberal church
organizations. The league is headed
by ex-President Taft.
Dr.' Griffin will lecture Monday
night at the Natural Science auditor-
ium on the subject: "Adventures in
Patriotism," the lecture beginning at
7:30 o'clock. Tuesday evening there
will be a reception at the Unitarian
church parlor, from 7:30 to 9:30. All
men of the campus and the town are
invited to the dinner given at Lane
hall at 6 o'clock Wednesday evening.
A charge of 85 cents will be made
for the dinner. Dr. Cabot will act ap
toastmaster, and the dinner will be
followed with a talk by Dr. Griffin.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVILABE
American Field Service Will Aid 127
Students in France
In order to bind a closer relation-
ship between the colleges of France
and the United States, the American
Field Sercice's balance of 3,000,000
francs in French banks is being de-
voted to scholarships.
Three Million Franc Fund
The American Field Service was es-
tablished by private endowment, less
than two years before the entrance of
the United States into the war. It
furnished ambulances and field hospi-
tals that were manned by Americans.
When the United States entered the
war the government took over the en-
tire American Field Service, which
left a credit of three million francs
in France. The men who endowed
this private ~service decided to estab-
lish 127 scholarships with this money,
in honor of the 127 men who died in
action.
Open to Students Best Fitted
These scholarships are open to
graduate students of any of the rec-
ognized colleges or universities in the
country. The awards are given to
those students whose work shows that
they are best fitted to continue their
studies in a French university.
The student who receives one of
these scholarships is allowed a cer-
tain amount for transportation, and a
yearly allowance while attending
school in France. He is at liberty to
specialize in whatever work appeals
to him. Five of these awards were
given this year and 25 more are avail-
able in 1921. Further information re-
garding these scholarships may be ob-
tained from the dean of the graduate
school.

SOME OFE6,060 VOLUMES
RECEIVED BY LIBRRY~
PART OF COLLECTION ACCEPTED
FRIDAY FROM TAPPAN
ASSOCIATION
Some of the 6,000 volumes which
the Board of Regents accepted from
the Tappan Presbyterian association
at its meeting last Friday have al-
ready ben reecived by the Library.
Librarian W. W. Bishop, in a let-
ter to the Board of Regents asking
that the gift be accepted, said of the
collection, "The library is distinctive
and valuable, and will be a very
welcome addition to the General Li-
brary of the University of Michigan.
It contains a great many valuable'
theological works, and in addition a
large , nnber of important works in
other fields."
Early Printing Included
"There are many fine specimens of
early printing, and there are good ed-
itions of the Church Fathers which
are lacking in this Library," contin-
ued Librarian Bishop. "Much of the
later material is duplicate, but can
be exchanged for other books of value
to the University Library."
The collection consists very large-
ly of the private libraries of two for-
mer regents of the University -Rev.
Dr. George Duffield, who was a re
tent of the University from 1839 t'
1848, and his son, Rev. George Duf-
field, who was a regent from 1877 t-
1886. The library of these two note'
clergymen was presented to the Tap-
pan Presbyterian association in 188
by the Hon. D. Bethune Duffield of
Detroit.
Books lWay Be Changed
The gift was accepted with the stip-
ulation that the Library should have
complete freedom to treat the book-
as part of its collections and author-
ity to dispose of such of the books ,,,
prove to be duplicate or otherwis
unsuited to its needs.
It is the intention of Mr. Bishop t
have a special inscription on the
bookplate inserted- in each book
showing that the book formed part of
the Duffield library and was present-
ed to - the University by the Tappan
Presbyterian association,
Santa Claus To
Visit Ann Arbor
Kiddies, Is Plan
Representatives of fraternities, so-
rorities and house clubs will meet in
the auditorium of Lane hall at 5
o'clock Tuesday afternoon to get a list
of names of poor children of Ann Ar-
bor whom they will provide with
clothing and a Christmas party just
before the beginning of the holiday
vacation.
Under the direction of the City Fed-
eration of Associated Charities, the
Y. M. C. A., and the Y. W. C. A., 41i
fraternities and 19 sororities last
year gave a party and Christmas tree'
for from one 4o three children.

of the banquet, tickets are being sold
in large numbers to students and fac-
ulty members. The committee again
calls attention to the fact that the din-
ner is not strictly for Episcopal stu-
dents of the University but for those
on the campus who are interested.
Tickets are on sale at Harris hall,
corner of State and Huron streets.
0.. S UsSTADIUM FUND
REACHES $900,000 MARK

MILLION DOLLAR STRUCTURE
SEAT 63,000 HAS ADDED
FEATURES

TO

Since Oct 11, Ohio State university I
has secured more than $900,000 in its'
million dollar drive for a new stadium,
according to Prof. F. A. Mickle, chair-
man of the canvassing team for Ann
Arbor.
The city of Columbus alone, exclud-
ing the campus, raised half a milliont
dofiars, stated Professor Mickle. Moret
than $f69,000 was subscribed by stu-
dents on the campus, and the remain-
der has been donated by alumni. Sub-
scriptions are still coming in, many
from persons having no connection
with the University, but who are in-1
terested in its progress.1
To Start Work Now
Construction will be started immed-
iately, since all plans have been drawn
up.
With a seating capacity of 63,000,
the stadium will excel any of its kind
in the country. There will be two
tiers of seats, the upper one extending
over the lower and partially shielding
it against sun and inclement weather.
A movable stage will be constructed
at one end for outdoor movies and
open air productions. The distance1
around the outside will be more than
one-third of a mile.l
Beneath the stands all of the huge
space will be utilized. It has beent
carefully designed to provide for lock-
ers, dressing rooms, shower baths,
and toilet rooms. Two large spaces
which are approximately 80x100 feet
are available for indoor horse shows,t
industrial expositions, automobile
shows and indoor athletic activities,
such as track events, baseball, hand-~
ball and squash. Other structures of
this class have made little use of the
space under the seating, allowing it to
be filled with construction beams and
passageways.
Includes Track Facilities j
-One distinctive feature of the stad-
ium is the open end which makes pos-
sible a 220-yard straightaway and a
quarter-mile track around the football
field. It also helps ventilation which is
a problem in a structure seating so
many people. Another strong point is
the "bowed sides" which give a great-
er seating capacity and a better view
of the field from even the seats farth-
est away.
Some of the novel facts of the struc-
ture are: Eight-seven arches around
the outside, the arch at the main en-
trance being 72 feet wide by 86 feet
high, 56 stairways feeding 112 ailes
and furnishing a circulation capacity
sufficient to empty the stadium in seven
minutes without crowding, and 83 en-
trances at which tickets may be taken.
Forty thousand cubic yards of concrete
and 4,000 tons of steel will be used in
the construction. Commencement ex-
ercises may be witnessed by an unlim-
ited number of spectators.
A huge sign with 100 electric light
bulbs was placed in front of the Col-
umbus auditorium during the progress
of the campaign. One bulb was lit for
each $100,000 reached.
The land which Ohio State has ex-
pressly for athletic purposes aggre-
gates 92 acres, this amount being giv-
en by the state.
Dean Effinger to Address Normal
Dean John R. Effinger will give the
commencement address to the grad-
uating class of the Central Michigan
Normal school Dec. 16 at Mt. Pleasant.

UNION ORCHESTRA TO
MAKE SEASON'S DEBUT<
Biff-bam-Spotlight! t
Magic, hypnotism, music and danc-
ing at the Union Spotlight vaudevillez
will be given Tuesday evening at Hill
auditorium, commencing at 8 o'clock.t
"This year's Spotlight will be char-
acterized by fast movement through-1
out, and will be different from any
performance ever given. No man
taking a major part in the show thisl
year has ever before had a lead in thet
Spotlight," said Peirce McLouth, '21E,l
chairman, yesterday.
"It is a very well balanced program
and I think we have a great Spot-
light this year," was the comment of
E. Mortimer Shuter, director of Union,
productions.I
Music and Dance Mix
Making its season's debut, the Union
orchestra will start things by playing
the overture, "Morning, Noon and'
Night in Vienna." "Bits of Song andS
Chatter," by Schemm & Walter, Is a
"patter" act in which , George
Schemm, '23, takes the woman's partf
and does the dancing, while "Zo"f
Walter, '23, will accompany on the
piano.. Several of the latest songE
hits are to be interpreted and pre-
sented in a novel manner by the
pair.
Myron E. Chon, '23, saxophone. ar-
tist, will follow with several selec-
tions, chief among which will be
"Waltz Llewellyn."
Hypnotism Features
Magic and hypnotism will then be
the order of the program, with 'Rob-
ert Deebach, '23D, who has been on
Western vaudeville circuits for sev-
eral years. After he has subdued the
minds of about 15 men whom he will
ask to volunteer from the audience,
he' will demonstrate his remarkable
will power by influencing liis victims1
to act as he wants them. It comes
from a reliable source that he is go-1
ing to make orators out of some, act-
ors out of others and fishermen out
of still others.
Rumors about the campus that Dee-
bach's acts are not bona fide have
called forth vigorous protests from1
officials. "There will be no fakes of
any kind and I cannot emphasize this
too strongly," said McLouth yester-
day.
"Chalk Talk," by James C. Brown,
'23, will be given after the "Mystery
Man" has finished. His drawings are
said to be good, and his constant rep-
artee equally so.
George Rogers, '21E, and his six-
piece novelty orchestra will undertake
a feature musical program, and a
hint of its character is given when
it is known that two pianos will be
used.
Concluding the program, the Union
orchestra will render a snappy grand
finale number.
AIRPLANE EXPERT TO TALK
AT AERO CLUB EETING
E. Loude, '15E, aero-engineer, will
address a meeting of the Aero club
Tuesday night at 7:15 o'clock in the
Union. Mr. Loude had charge of build-
ing the Martin bombing plane during
the war. The club will make an effort
to secure a plane for its members in
the event that the air service of the
R. o. T. C. is established in the Univer-
sity.

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED
Michiganensian wants photo-
graphers right away to take
snap shots. Call Avery, phone
2220, or call at office in the
Press building.
NOV-ELTY AND SNAPI,
SPOTLiGHT PLANSI

Program Introduces Variety of
Including Music, Dancing,
4plnotism

Acts

0. S. U. BREAKS WITH WISCONSIN
WILL NOT CANCEL OTHER
GAMES
RULE THAT PLAYERS
MUST BE NUMBERED
Faculty Athletic Committee Disap-
proves of Nine Game Season
at Present Time
(By Associated Press),
Chicago, Dec. 4.-Western Confer-
ence football coaches today arranged
their 1921 schedules at a meeting
which brought forth two breaks be-
tween traditional rivals for Big Ten
gridiron supremacy. Ohio State will
not meet Wisconsin, 1920 runner up,
next year. The two schools severed
football relations after an argument
over where the game should be -play-
ed. Chicago failed to schedule a game
with Michigan although it was said
there had been no ill feeling over the
failure of the representatives to ar-
range a contest.
While it was announced at first by
the coaches that all athletic relations
between Ohio State and Wisconsin
had been severed it became known
later that both schools would carry
out contracts, already made for ath-
letic contests, eliminating any chance
for cancellation of basketball or base-
ball games.
Coaches Disappointed
Regarding the failure of Chicago
and Michigan to schedule a game,
Coaches Stagg of Chicago and Yost
of Michigan both expressed disap-
pointment.
The faculty athletic' committee
notified the coaches that it had voted
against lengthening the schedule to /
nine games so each coach arranged
for four or five games with other Big
Ten schools.
The faculty committee also voted
to make numbering of players in the
football game compulsory, ruling that
the numbers must be eight inches
high, easily distinguishable and that
each coach must announce the num-
bers of his players a week before the
game.
Five places will count in track plac-
es instead of four as heretofore, the
committee decided, and no team of
less than five men will be allowed to
enter any athletic meet.
May Limit Practice
The possibility of football interfer-
ing with studies was discussed at
length by the committee. A commit-
tee composed of Tyre of Wisconsin,
Aigler of Michigan and French- of
Ohio State was appointed to conduct
an investigation as to whether it
would be advisable to limit practice
hours to set periods.
The 'football schedule includes in-
tersectional game between Princeton
and Chicago and Harvard and Indi-
ana, both to be played early in the
season and in the East. Notre Dame,
generally one of the strongest of
Middle Western elevens but not in
the Conference, was. given three
games by Conference teams, by Pur-
due, Indiana and Iowa.
Athletic Events Awarded
The faculty committee made the
following awards of athletic events:
Indoor track meet, Northwestern,
March 17 and 18; swimming meet,
Northwestern, March 17 and 18; ten-
nis meet, Chicago, June 4; cross
country run, Indiana, Nov. 19; out-
door track meet, Chicago, June 4;
gymnastic meet, Indiana, March 11.
Basketball coaches voted that a
player could be taken out and put
back in the game only once in each
contest, and that a held ball within
the free throw line must be taken out
and put in play 15 feet in front. of

the goal. Officials of the game were
named and minor details of the sched-
ule previously announced completed.
Engineering Societies Seek Members
Various engineering societies, in-
cluding the Chemical Engineering so-
ciety, the A. I. E. E., the A. S. M. E.,
and the Civil Engineering society will
conduct a co-operative campaign next
week to secure the membership of all
junior and senior engineers in the so-
ciety to which their respective courses
make them eligible.

CAMPUS NOBLES ORGANIZE
UNIVERSITY SHRINE+

CLUB

A University Shrine club was or-
ganized at a mfeeting Thursday night
in the Union of 26 nobles. The pur-
pose of the club is to keep alive the
spirit of Shrinedom among nobles
actively connected with the University.
The representation at the first meet-
ing consisted of faculty members and
students in about equal numbers.
Owing to the impossibility of se-
curing the names and addresses of
every shriner on the campus, all those
who were not notified of the first meet-
ing are requested to give their names
to Prof. Frank A. Mickle, 1031 Mich-
igan avenue, secretary of the club.

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