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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 03, 1920 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILX

E

LY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1920.

.me 1

Number 51.1

-1

ere will be
an College
an Union.

a meeting of the local chapter of the Association of
Professors Tuesday, Dec. 7, at 8 p. m. In room 304,
All members are urged to be present.
C. B. VIBBERT.
Per E. Holt.

rsity Women:
niversity women who plan to be in Ann Arbor during Christmas va-
. should leave their names and addresses in the office of the Dean
omen as soon as possible.
MYRA B. JORDAN.

WHAT'S GOING ON
FRIDAY
-University Press 'Club of Mich-
n meeting, reading room, Union.
-University Press Club of Mich-
in meeting, reading room, Union.
-A. A. 0. N. 1W. S. diner at the

on.
-University Press Club of
1 banquet, main dining

Mich.
room,

i-All baseball, candidates meet
oach Pratt. at the Union.
3 Polonia Literary circle holds
nportant meeting in Lane hall au-
torium.
D-Dixie club meets at Union.
)-Chinese- Students' eclub meets
Lane hall.
--Regular meeting of' Alpha Nu,
urth floor, University hall.

SATURDAY
-Upper Room Bible
Lane hall.

class meets]

:30-Greater Newark club meets at
Union, the room number to be post-
ed on the buleltin board.
:00-J. T. Doran speaks on "The
Northwestern Labor Movement" in
Natural Science auditorium under
the auspices of the Socialist so-
ciety.
:00-President Marion L. Burton
and Mrs. Burton hold reception for
foreign students at the President's
home.
U-NOTICES
11 campus members of the A. A. 0.
N. M. S. are invited to attend the
dinner at 6 o'clock Thursday eve-
ning at the Union. Those who ex-
pect to be present may reserve
places by calling Mickle at 571.
adge Harry Fisher, of Chicago, will
address the Menorah society at 8
o'clock Sunday evening in Lane
hail.
udents desiring to fill out applica.
tions for membership in the Play-
ers' club may do so from 2 to 5
o'clock this afternoon at the office
of Prof. It. D. Hollister,* which is
behind the stage in the auditorium
of University hall.
ROF. SCOTT AND LEE WHITE
SPEAK TO PRESS CLUB
(Continued from Page One)
ve to face, economically and social-
, is the unsuccessful newspaper, and
e most dangerous paper is the one
hich is on the ragged edge," de-
a.red Mr. White of the Detroit News.
e showed in what unbusiness-like
ethods many . country newspapers
e conducted, but he stated at the
Dse, "It is a most potent and en-
yable profesison."
A. E. McCrae, of the Muskegon
.ronicle, added several comments
hen Mr.White had finished.
Prof. John 1. Brumm, president of
e club, was chairman of the session
sterday afternoon.
Convention Closes Today
Today is the final day of the con-
ntion. The morning session will
gin promptly at 8 o'clock, when
)well J. Carr, ,formerly state editor
the Detroit Fress Press will speak
"The Influence of the Accounting
oom on Newspaper Policy." Prof.'
R. Sunderland will follow, speak-
g on "The Newspaper and the
urts," and then Prof. J. S. Reeves,
11 speak on "The Political Editor-

icism," and Rev. Lloyd Douglas will
address the banqueters on "Newspaper
Humor and Otherwise." Vocal solos
by Prof. William Wheeler and read-
ings by Prof. Ray K. Immel will com-
plete the program.
City News
About 400 plates will be laid at the
Chamber of Commerce banquet which
i to be held next Wednesday night in
the new banquet hall at the Armory.
A program of general interest, con-
taing speeches and music will be
announced soon. All members of the
C. of C. are invited to come and bring
guests if they choose. Plates will
cost $1.
Contrary to generalopinion, a prom-
inent Ann Arbor coal dealer stated
yesterday that the price of coal would
doubtless be no cheaper in the near
future. However, some grades of coal
are now available which were not a
siort time ago.
Wednesday and Saturday mornings
are market times in Ann Arbor. About
30 or 40 farmer and truck grower
wagons and autos park on both sides
of Fourth avenue, just east of the
Court house, with everything for sale
from potatoes and apples to cider and
live fowls.
The present term of circuit court
will terminate with the close of the
Cadwell-Morton murder case. It is
thought that it will be finished in two
or three days. Late yesterday after-
noon, the prosecution was progress-
ing with his direct examination.
J. J. Kelly, manager of the local
branch of the Michigan State Tele-
phone company, mailed out with the
month's statement a circular stating
that the telephone rates were increas-
ed 15 per cent. This raise follows the
permission of the public utilities com-
mission to increase the rate in all of
the company's exchanges except the
one at Detroit. The manager also
stated that previous to this raise the
Ann Arbor rates were unusually low
and this exchange had never paid ex-
penses before.
BISHOP McCORMICK TO TALK
AT EPISCOPAL BANQUET
Music by Varsity Quartet and Tommy
Thomas' Orchestra to
Supplement Talks
Episcopal students will hold a fel-
lowship dinner Dec. 7 at the Union, to
promote better acquaintance among
students and between the students and
the faculty. The time has been set
at 5:30 in order to eliminate conflict
with the Spotlight vaudeville.
The Rt. Rev. John W. McCormick,
bishop of western Michigan, will be
the speaker of 'the evening. Prof.
Morris P. Tilley will be the toast-
master, while Albert Jacobs, '21, will
be the student sepaker. The Varsity
quartet will sing and instrumental
music will be furnished by Tommy
Thomas orchestra.
Tickets are now on sale at Harris
hall, and a canvass of Episcopal 'stu-
dents is being made by student com-
im ttees. The price is $1.25 and tick
ets are not limited to Episcopalians.
Purchase must be made this week, in
order to ascertain the number who
will attend.:
J. T. DORAN TO ADDRESS
INTERCOLLEGIATE SOCIALISTS

PENNELL THINKS TEAMI
SHOULDPLAYIN EAST
(Continued from Page One)
hood they are most anxious to attract
to their student bodies. Prior to our
return to the Conference, Michigan
was talked of a great deal through-
out the East because of the excell-
ence of her teams, and the high char-
acter of her sportsmanship. Our East-
ern games drew well, relations were
most pleasant, and the benefits we
derived therefrom were most excel-.
lent. Upon our return to the Confer-
ence, however, cessation of all East-
ern competition resulted in the loss
of a great deal of the momentum we
had attained; in other words, our
Eastern relations were not extended
long enough to give them a real cu-
mulative value. At the present time,
as a result, the University of Michi-
gan is practically without any recog-
nition along the Eastern seaboard,.
with the result that she is very little
known among the boys who are grow-
ing up here. Should she compete in
Eastern football, particularly with one
of the three foremost schools ,the
publicity and advertising resulting
therefrom would be far-reaching, and
would do much to attract the better
class of student, and to retain inter-
est and loyalty among her alumni.
Would Not Conflict
It is with no .thought of interfer-
ence in Conference rules or regula-
tions that this communication is sent.
Back in 1912-13 the writer as editor
of the Michigan Daily, dedicated the
entire editorial efforts of the paper
to a return of Michigan to the Con-
ference. It is his personal convic-
tion, viewed from six years' residence
in New York, that to a man our
Eastern alumni are happy over Mich-
igan's return to the fold.
We do not understand, however.
that a schedule of Eastern games is
in conflict with the policy of the Con-
ference. ,Chicago has scheduled a
home and home game with Princeton;
we understand on good authority that
Illinois is negotiating with Harvard;
and it is no open secret that Yale is
seeking an intersectional home and
home game, and iregards Michigan
favorably.
Inasmuch as Michigan's 1921 schei-
ule has not yet been announced, we
trust that this communication will be
given prominence in the columns of
The Daily, and that, if your views co-
incide with ours, the subject will be
given, in addition, your editorial ap-
proval. Thanking you for your cour-
tesy in this matter, and with best
wishes, I am
FRANK W. PENNELL, 12,
President Univrsity of Michigan
Club of New York.
HURST IN FAVOR OF EASTERN
GAME ON MICHIGAN SCHEDULE
(Continued from Page One)
Up to a few years ago nongreat ef-
ofrt had been made to keep in touch
with Michigan alumni. The result of
this failure was shown in the diffi-
culty of raising the funds for the
Michigan Union. If the Michigan
spirit had been kept alive, these funds
would certainly have come in in great-
er volume.
We in the East, who haven't had
the opportunity of keeping in touch
with Michigan as those residing near-
er have, feel that through an ath-
letic policy of scheduled contests in
all sections of the country, Michi-
gan's alumni spirit can be greatly de-
veloped.

I wrote Mr. Shaw, Alumni secretary,
some time ago concerning this very
point-I believe at the time of the in-
tercollegiates in 1919, as there was
some intimation made then that this
might be Michigan's last appearance;
and I am now writing you in order
that you may know the feeling of the
alumni in the East.
E. R. HURST,
Secretary Michigan Club of New
England.
BOARD OF REGENTS HOLDS
REGULAR SESSION TODAY
dommittees of the Board of Re-
gents were in Ann Arobr yesterday
conferring with Presid'ent Marion L.
Burton in preparation for the regular
meeting of the board today.
The Regents' committee on edu-
cational policies heard members of
the faculties of the departments of
education, chemistry andarchtec-
ture.
CONSUMPTION OF NARCOTICS
ON INCREASE, SAYS GOMEZ
Dr. GA. DuMez, federal health
service officer, spoke to pharmacy
students yesterday evening upon traf-
fic in narcotic drugs, demonstrating
by statistics the recent increase in

consumption of narcotics the world
over, and emphasizing the fact that
the United States has taken the lead
in attempts to curb the drug evil.
Hypnotist Heads
Vaudeville Acts
Complete control of the actions and
sensations of his subject is promised
by Robert Deebach, '23D, in his hyp-
notic act in the Spotlight vaudeville
next Tuesday evening. Deebach has
made full preparations for his stunt,!
and, though his time on the' stage will
not be sufficiently long for him to pro-
duce his entire "book of tricks," he
will be able to make a few convincing
demonstrations. He plans, among
other things, to keep some 15 or 20
subjects under his influence at, one
time, and he will call upon the audi-
ence to furnish these subjects.
Deebach is choosing but one man to
assist him in the presentation, Her-
bert Dunphy, '23, whom he will use
for the more complete stages of hyp-
notism. The act will embrace two
kinds of hypnotism, lethargic and
catalaeptic, the former being that in
which Deebach will control the pulse
and sensations of the subject, while in
the cataleptic stage, the body of the
subject becomes so rigid as to allow
three or four men to stand on it when
it is supported on the backs of two
chairs.
Deebach has had several years' ex-
perience in presenting hypnotic acts
in vaudeville in the West. During
the war he gave many demonstrations
in army camps, notably in Arizona.
in Washington and at Camp Sheridan.
At one time he suggested that his sub-
ject, a private, act as mess sergeant
with the result that the hypnotized
doughboy armed with a couple of
butcher knives and sticks of wood,
took forcible possession of the mess
shack.
Although this is Deebach's second
year in the University, Tuesday eve-
ning is his first public appearance in
Ann Arbor.
Northwestern Bans Class Dances
Ordinances issued by the faculty of
Northwestern university, placing a
ban on dancing at all class functions,
have invoked the wrath of the class
of '23, who are putting forth a stren-
uous complaint.
Colby Leaves for South America
Washington, Dec. 2. - Secretary
Colby plans to leave Washington to-
morrow for South America to return
a recent visit of the Prerident-elect
of Brazil.

Grain ger Shows
Great Technique.
Percy Grainger, the young Austra-
lian genius of the piano, made his
debut last night in the Hill auditor-
ium. His virile manner and winning
personality immediately made him a
favorite with the appreciative audi-
ence which had congregated to hear
him.
His first piece, an Organ Prelude
and Fugue, D major, by Bach-Bu-
soni, showed great training, tech-
nique, and ability. During the first
part there was a lack of expression:
which made the hearing of it some-
what tiresome, but the second part
could not have been played better.
The musical tone with which he play-
ed the "Humoresque" by H. Balfour
Gardiner would have delighted any
music lover.
Mr. Grainger put his best expres-,
sion in Kramer's "When the Sun Goes
Down," while his rendition of the
"Juba Dance" brought a smile of en-
joyment from every face in the audi-
ence. Upon the audience's request
this piece was played over.
After playing "Variations on a
Theme by Paginini" by Brahms, Mr.
Grainger played three encores, one
being "Springtime" by Grieg and an-
other, the famous "Turkey in the
Straw." The latter was changed into
a classic under the artist's skillful
hands.
Mr. Grainger's own compositions,
"Country Grandees" and "One More
Day, My John," show what a great
influence Bach has over him.
Read The Daily advertisements.-
kdv.

I

0

I

GET RESERVATIONS
EARLY, IS ADVICE
Request that students leaving Ann
Arbor for the Christmas vacation
purchasettheir railroad and sleeping
car tickets as soon as possible is
made by J. W. Switzer, assistant gen-
eral passenger agent of the Michigan
Central railroad, in a letter to Pres-
ident Marion L. Burton.
"To properly care for the large
number of students leaving Ann Ar-
bor," wrote Mr. Switzer, "students
should, when it is possible for them
to do so, purchase railroad and sleep-
ing car tickets and check their bag-
gage in advance. This will relieve
congestion at the ticket office and
baggage room, and enable us to take
much better care of the students us-
ing our road."
A. J. Wiselogel, in charge of the
station here, emphasizes the request
made by the Detroit office, and asks
that students give the matter their
immediate attention.
More Track Men Coming Out Daily
When candidates responded for the
first call of the season the largest
proportion of the men were desirous
of entering the short distance compet-
ition, and each succeeding practice
sees a larger number turn out. Coach
Farrell and Captain Butler feel con-
fident that from ,this large field of
aspirants they will have little trouble'
lin adding several capable new men
to the already large list of proven vet-
erans.

CALL US

1

FOR

LET US FIGURE YOUR BILL

THE

CENTURY MARKET
213 N. MAIN

Ladies Party Gowns a Specially

..

PERSONAL GR EETING CARDS
Leave Your Order Early - Special Attention Given to

CHRISTMAS ENGRAVING

at

WvAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

I

Vacation

Starts the 21 st

DEL G RENNAN

CUSTOM TAILOR

Satisfaction

Tuxedoes

Evening Clothes
Golf Suits

White Flannel Vest ,
Riding Breeches
Knickers

eginning promptly at 2:30 o'clock.
afternoon session will open with
ddress on "Newspaper, Consciece,"
)ean A. H. Lloyd. Then "The Unt-
ity and Industry," will be discuss-.
y Dean M. E. Cooley; and "Library
ices to the Newspapers," by Lib-
an W. W. Bishop. Following this
isiness session will be held and
ion of officers will take palce. All
ons will be held in the reading
a on' the second floor of the Un.

.

J. T. Doran k own to the labor
movement . as "Red" Doran, will ad-
dress the Intercollegiate Socialist so-
ciety on "The Northwestern Labor
Movement," at 8 o'clock tomorrow'
evening in the Natural Science audi-
torium.0
His experience with Pacific coast
labor problems, especially in organ-
izing the "floater" portion of western
labor has been varied and. thorough,
according to members of the society,
and they expect a full presentation of
the subject in the lecture.

Place Your Orders NoW for Christmas Delivery

14 Nickels Arcade

Telephone 152-R

To Give Banquet '
iet at 7 o'clock tonight
the convention. Presid

will
dent

. , a ....._ ..F ... ,-

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