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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I MLL.4 AVAi\..1rilulJiN UI ILL4 Y

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Ent red at the postoffce at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5.
Ofices Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 966; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not ncessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith. and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse, the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"what's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY, JR.
News Editor ..............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
g . I\. Adams, Jr H. W. Hitchcock
T. A. Bernstein J. E. McManis
B. P. Campbell T. W. Sargent, Jr.
J. f. Dakin
Editorials.........Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, C. H. Murchison
Sports .........................................Robert Angell
-Assistant News........ .. ....................... P. Lovejoy
Womn's Editor.............................. Mary D. Lane
Telegraph... ................. ........ .....West Gallogly
Assistants
Josepine XWaldo Thomas J. Whinery Harry B. Grundy
Paul G. Weber R. W. Wrobleski Winefred Biethan
Ahnea Barlow George Reindel Robert D. Sage
Elizabeth Vickery Dorothy Monfort Marion Nichols
G. E. Clark Minnie Muskatt Frances Oberholtzer
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ...".....LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
Adveitsing.............................D. P. Joyce
Credit3 and Classified Ads......................j .W Rawlings
Pubhicaion.......................................F..Heath
Accounts.............. ............... ............ E. R. Priehs
Circu~tion....................................C P. Schneider
Assistants
R.b. Lambrecht B. G. sower Lester W. Millard
Robert 0. Kerr. Sigmund Kunstadter V. . Hillery
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
The night editors for the week will be: Brewster
Campbell, Monday night; Thornton Sargent, Tues-
day night ; Thomas Adams, Wednesday night ; John
Dakin, Thursday night; John McManis, Friday
night ; and Joseph Bernstein, Saturday night.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5
There will be a. meeting of the entire editorial
staff and tryouts at 4:30 this afternoon.
GETTING STARTED
Once more an army of freshmen has entered
Michigan's walls-men and women from all parts
of the world and in every walk of life. For the
past few days they have been catching at the rag-
ged ends of our preliminary routine and today they
enter into the real university life. While they are
still a bit unsure of their procedure and somewhat
uncertain of what the future holds for them, a
word about campus work outside the classroom
might not be amiss.
Activity is the watchword of every real Michigan
man and woman. To be in something, to push
some project that will be of benefit to the Univer-
sity and its students is what we are striving to do.
Michigan is a large university-one of the largest
in America-and, as such, is able to provide just
the kind of activity that will appeal to any student,
no matter what his tastes. There are publications
for the literary, glee clubs and the band for the mu-
sical, all the collegiate sports for the athletic, engi-
neering societies for those with technical inclina-
tions, and numberless committees and organiza-
tions glad to welcome those interested in them. En-
trance into any of these forms of activity will prove
of mutual benefit.
If you are a newcomer, remember that you are
welcome. Don't think you are intruding. You
will always be given a fair chance to show your

abilities. Don't wait until you are a sophomore.
Go out for something now. Even though you will
not gain official recognition the first year, you will
be better qualified, by entering into active campus
service at once, to do worth while work for the re-
mainder of your college course.

meaning for those who could learn its values under
such a master.
Fortunately, Michigan was able to avail itself of
Professor Demmon's leadership for an unusual era
of usefulness. To only one other professor in the
University has it been given to influence and in-
struct more than two full generations, and Profes-
sor Demmon's part in the upbuilding of Michigan's
greatness can be counted best in terms of the thou-
sands whose lives were touched by his teaching.
A STUDENTS' PRESIDENT
Michigan's great promise of progress lies in an
understanding co-operation between students and
administration. When there is distrust or dislike
on either side, the University suffers. That neither
of these stumbling blocks is going to appear under
the new regime is the 'strong conviction of every
student who has had the. privilege of meeting Pres-
ident Marion Leroy Burton. The grasp of his
firm, friendly hand is a masonry of good feeling.
Each of the four receptions at the Union this week
will cement more strongly the ties of real fellow-
ship which he has been engaged in establishing
since his arrival in July.
Dr. Burton is a students' president. He has
known and befriended the college man and woman
for many years. Almost the entire time of an in-
terview for The Daily was given up to questioning
-by the president-of what the student attitude
was likely to be on a number of important campus
questions. For the first time, the student is to have
both active and continuous official backing against
the landlady who takes unfair advantage of him.
He is, when President Burton carries through his
present policy, to have a special dean of student
affairs to look after his interests, and not to serve
as a policeman in any sense of the word. The liv-
ing standard of students is to be raised as high as
possible, with excellent men's dormitories as the
first aim. And in all relations with the student
body, careful consideration of individual cases
rather than blanket application of rules is to be the
watchword.
The great moments of students, the times when
they feel compelled to work off their exuberant
feelings over a victory or some other great occasion
in a way their grandfathers would not think of, are
known and appreciated by President Burton. He
has had them himself, and has not forgotten them.
But in all this, the man who is to guide Michigan
in its coming era is no sentimentalist. Nobody will
ever leave his office without getting what the pres-
ident, to the best of his lights, believes is a square
deal. But nobody will ever find any reason to call
him a "sob sister." Michigan needs an executive
who understands the student; it also needs a man,
who can make a far-seeing decision and hew to it,
saying "no" if need be. It has them both in Marion
Leroy Burton.
The student who mocks at traditions and refuses
to respect them will find that the University of
Michigan is also, for him, the University of Hard
Knocks. Traditions are not adhered to because
they are sensible, for sometimes they are not. They
are here because it has been found, over many
years of experience, that they build Michigan spir-
it. Spirit is what distinguishes a university from
a correspondence school.

C A

i . 1Fi
J'

TWO STORES
Vooksand Suplies for all Collegess
Both Stores

,4w*

Both Ends of Di onal Walk

I

.

FETrkOIT IUNITED I lAN
in Effect May 1S, 1920
Between
Deiroit, Ainn Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6: 10 a. in. and hourly to
9:10 p. M.
Linilteds to Jackson at 8:40 a. in. and
every two hours to- 8 :40 p. an. Ex-
presses at 9:45 a. i. and every two
hours to 9:45 p. m.
Locals to Detroit--5:55 a.m., 7:05 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:05 p.m.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson -- 7:45 a.m., and
12: 10 p.m.
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Mcii: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saved you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Bids for refreshment concession for
athletic contests on Ferry Field held
under the direction of the Athletic
Association of the University of Mich-
igan for the college year 1920-1921,
will be received at the Athletic Asso-
ciation offices, Ann Arbor Press build-
ing, up to 6:00 p. m. Thursday, OD-
tober 7, 1920.-Adv.
I NOTICE!

ATY SE VICE
WATCHES CLOCKS
FOUNTAIN PENS
JEWELRY SILVERWARE
GOLD AND SILVER PENCILS

H Ai7L 110 R.FUiE

I

STATE STREET JEWE-.ERS

e

r+
kA
7
it

HE informal
dance at the
country club is
not so informal
that you can af-
ford to wear a
collar you are not
sure of.

a

LOGWOOD ZLWOOD

'EA R L 7WIL.SQN,~tlitlY~edTs

Collars c3 shirts

FOR THE STUDENT
IN NEED
We have the only complete
Optical Department
on State Street
ANY OPTICAL REPAIRS
:: MADE:
Lenses ground in Our Own
Shop
This Means Service

I.

Up the

Stairs

in Nickel's Arcade

EYES EXAMINED

11

TO THE

Telescope

R. C. Fuller

Life's Fairy Tales
The student heaved a sigh and a groan,
He gave a shudder, a cry, a moan,
Then fell to the floor, his energy spent,
For the landlady hadn't doubled his rent.
Then What?
Epitaph in Detroit cemetery:
Rest in peace-until we meet again.

PROFESSOR DEMMON'S INFLUE NCE
When,the public learns of the death of a useful
man, it counts his loss largely in terms of energy
and will and ability. The hands that could turn
skillfully to many tasks, the mind that could, direct
and plan, the heart that .would hold steady to a
great aim, are hard things for the world, which
needs them, to-replace. But to those who lived
close to the life which is gone, who knew its warm
friendship and its fine qualities of humanity, the
personality must always seem the greater loss.
Around the late Prof. Isaac Newton Demmon,
this circle of the intimate was large indeed, for it
included not only the friends whom a man makes in
the usual course of home social life, but all those
who attended his -classes in the University over a
period of forty-four years. Professor Demmon
had a way of teaching which brought the student
to a finer appreciation of the value of true scholar-
ship. The man himself, with his high-minded loy-
alty to the ideal of best things, was an inspiration.
Those who had never before known the beauty and,
influence of books, learned from him how they
could enter into the life of a man, mold him to a
broader culture and a{kindlier spirit toward his
fellows. English literature came to bear a new

We nominate for the presidency of the Royal
Order of Oil Cans last year's freshman who for
fear everyone won't know he's been here before
keeps repeating in a loud voice, "The old town
ain't what she used to be."
Dear Noah:
In my home town I was real popular with the
boys but since coming to Michigan I haven't met
a single gentleman. What should I do?
LONELY.
Why not find employment in an arsenal and then
you can always be sure of having arms around you.
The other night while we were out with our
girl she kept singing the praises of some gink she'd
justt met. Finally she came to the front with "I
like Bill because he's always saying something that
I never hear from any one else." To which we
feelingly replied, "What's he been doing again?
Asking you for a date?" And after that several
remarked about what a quiet couple we were.
What, we repeat, has become of the old-fashioned
humorist who used to make the rafters of the opera
house ring with laughter when he pulled this one:
ist cabby-That's an awfully poor looking horse
you have there.
2nd ditto-Yeh. You see I toss him every morn-
ing to see whether he gets his oats or I get a pint
of moonshine and he's lost for 6 days straight.
Famous Closing Lines: A
"Rapped in slumber," murmured the burglar as
he sandbagged the sleeping man.
NOAH COUNT.

REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST
With Haller & Fuller,
306 South/ State Street
I'It
r
4
Just
Press the Btmz.
-Hold it a secoed and lei t
The Parker Fountr in Pen is
ready for rany tho usw7 Itc
of cmooth, blot-free wri
A dandy pen for schoryi s:."l
Parker "Lucky Curve" e^as
to the pen and not to ii
Safety-sealed-it can't Ya u ;
any condition.
The Nc-w, Parker Pot: -r
Clp held in rsc. i'k /
' a washer. Holds t 1
Prevents lsig e
mh nOW during rough pLay,
paten 25c extra.
~at~nt cvp
bolds the
Pon at
pocet
*(5'~F~y-.$A L :-5-
Sold and Guaranteed by
Chas. W. Graham, Two Stores
Quarry Drug Company
Calkins Drug Company
Slater Book Shop
0. D. Morrill, Prtg. & Office Supplies
L. C. Schleede, Stationery
Dawson Brothers, Drugs
A. E. Crippen, Drugs
A. E. Mummery, Drugs
E. C. Edsill (Rexall Store)
Fischer's Pharmacy
Arcade Jewelry Shop

Where you may select your meal from
a forty-foot- table steaming with a va-
riety of all kinds of pure food deicio is-
l cooked by experts. Bakery goods

Ar cade Cafeiteri a

fresh from our own ovens.

Our Special Blend of Coffee with Jr-
sey cream is exceptional.
Economy of Cafeteria service ena-
bios us to serve at low prices.

4

C. J. FINGERLE.

i

Dinner 11:30 to 1 P.M.

4

Supper 5:30 to 7 P. M

,

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