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December 01, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JHIC

4

H1C

.i tie cnage
AT THE WHITNEY
Pep is the keynote of Fanchon and
Marco's super-revue, "The Satires of
1920,," which comes Sunday night to
the Whitney theatre. This season's
offering is the most pretentious ever'
produced on the Pacific coast, and is
brand new in idea,' in staging, and .n
costuming.
There is a real plot, the struj~ggles
of a Texas oil kind who labor s under
the error that he can produce a fea-
ture film being depicted. Th:ere is a
worl'd of humor in its development
and brilliant revue numbers follow
each other with great rapidity. In
several of these, Fanchon and Marco
show new and intricate steps, Marco's
playing during one of the dances be-
ing a feature.
Prominent in the supporfting cast
are golden-voiced Miss Eva Clark, the
prima donna, Murial Styrker, Daisy
De Witte, and Lucille Harmon. The
girls, a bevy of California beauties of
extreme youth, wear costumes in
keeping with their sunny state.
The book of the piece was written
by Jean Havez, whose work for Zieg-
feld's Follies made him nationally
known, while the music and lyrics are
by Fanchon and Marco.
Aeturial Socletj Will Aeet Tonight
Convening for -thn first time this
year, the Actuarial society w ill meet
at 7:30 o'clock this evening in room
403, Mason hall. -

CONSERVATION PHASE
ISAYS HARNESSING OF ST. LAW-
RENCE MILL SAVE MUCH
COAL:
Chicago, Ill., Nov. 30-H. C. Gard-
ner, president of the Great Lakes-St.
Lawrence Tidewater association, to-
day characterized the conservation
phase of the St. Lawrence improve-
ment as "fundamentally the most im-
portant of all."
He said that the electricity gener-
ated by harnessing the flow of the
Great Lakes to the sea would furnish
power to every city, town, and farm-
stead in northern New York and New
England. Hie quoted estimates that
within 10 or 20 years the annual coal
saving would amount to 100,000,000
tons.
Reviewing the proposal of a. water-
way from the Great Lakes to the ocean
Mr. Gardner in his statement said:
"Above Montreal the width of the
St. Lawrence averages close to two
miles. it is in this part of the river
thatn there occur the great rapids with
their total fall of 220 feet- and aggre-
gate length of some 45 miles, that
must be overcome by the works of
man before the St. Lawrence will be-
come the untiring and ceaseless slave
it is destined soon to be.
"The chief benefits of the improve-

ments+*assuming that the InternationalI
Joint commission's report will be fa-
vorable and that the United States and
Canadian governments approve, will
be these:
"The farmers and industries of the
1whole region that is nearer to the
Great Lakes than to our salt water
ports will reap the advantage of lower
transportation costs.
''The people of northern New York
and New England will be bonefitted
even more than their western breth-
ren, for they will not only have the
improved transportation by water, but
will have electric power for distribu-
tion to every city, town and farmstead.
"But fundamentally the conserva-
tion phase of the St._ Lawrence im-
provement is most important of all.
Where on our own contirrent is there
a region that is not vitally interested
in a development that will revery year
for all future time savj us from the
need to burn millions of tons of our
"black diamonds" 'and use instead the
"white coal" that a beneficient Provi-
dence has laid at our doorstep? Some
good judges estimate that within a
decade or two, after the power demand
shall have grown to meet the supply,
this annual coal saving will amount
to a hundred million tons."
itl
,To the'rStudent
WHO CONSIDERS
HIS TIME VALUABLE
CAN you aford to take a long
drawn out class-course in
dancing, because it is inex-
pensive?
WOUJLDIVT you rather prefer a
course, taken at your con-
venience, as many lessons as
you need, and at any time you
desire?
TIME IS. MONEY

I

1 -9

SUGARBOWL
HO1 AE MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE [N THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR;
SUGAR BOWL

40

I Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom -
er, whether the account be large~
or small.I

I

The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $62,000.00
Resources........$5,000,000.00 ;
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron

T UTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOMt #
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

I

70 othUiesiyAe

4

'V.

I

q

wwwo

Vacation Starts 'the 2 1st

DEL G RENNAN

CUSTOM TAILOR

Satisfaction

Tuixedoes

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Evening Clothes
Golf Suits,

White Flannel Vests'
Riding Breeches
Knickers

-I

Olot or
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Place Your Orders Now for Christmas Delivery

The entire personnel of our
Ann Arbor branch is eager to
render service.

WHY NOT COME TO
Leene N.
HALSEY'S
Dance Studios

11 WUERTH
i- - mw

- ARC )JE Ie

14 Nickels Arcade-

Telephone 152-R

1

.

. -_

rm

It'sNevi

If you
I can pi

Camp'
Any Other S(
About to Att+
Dont Dl

^r too Late!
will come at once
prepare you for the
Davis Dance
--or-
ocial Function You Are =
end in the Near Future w
[y Come at Once!
s Dance Studio
Wuerth Arcade

i

,t~o~ ±L4 ~ 14 J

^ r

Halsey'

orntai/ v~f a i 'Y~ tD ; w,. i )ayc ~ '~cfu
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For

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