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October 09, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-09

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E WEATHER
E CHANGE IN TEM.-

A(fo
Well

Dlalix

PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

PERATURE

VOL XXXI. No. 5 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1920 PRICE THREE CEN

GIVEN MINES BY
COMMISSION CT
ACTION TAKEN TO SATISFY DIM-
..ESTIC DEMAN* FOR
COAL.
ORDERS EXTENDED TO
FEW WESTERN STATES
Large Increase in Coal Producion
Not Considered Sufficient For
Public Needs
Washington, Oct. 8.-Action to- sat-
isfy demands for domestic coal in var-
ious states was taken tonight by the
Interstate Commerce Commission In
an order requiring railroads of Mon
tana; Wyoming, Colorado, and New
Mexico to furnish coal cars to mhes
in preference to any other us.
Former orders of this character ap-
plied only east of the Mississippi. The
present order, the commission said,
would run until further notice, but
would be relaxed as the situation
warranted.
Permits Cancelled
The commission also ordered all
outstanding permits for use of coal
cars for other freight cancelled, but
announced that arrangements to con-
tinue the movement of certain essen-
tials, such as sugar beets, to factories
would be made.
Working in conjunction with coal
operators and railroads, a program
has been formulated, the commission
said, which is expected substantially
to meet domestic coal needs.
It is planned to transport approxi-
mately 2,100 cars daily for this pur-
pose into Indiana, Ohio, Michigan,
eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee,
western Pennsylvania and West Vir-
ginia. Attention is also being given
to needs of domestic consumers in
other states, the commission added.
Production Not Suffieient
Despite an increase in coal produc-
tion which up to Sept. 25 exceeded
that of last year by 51 million tons
the commission said, "There has not
been a sufficient production of the
sizes of coal for domestic purposes
to satisfy the present demand." Com-
plaints have been received from In-
diana, Ohio, Michigan, Oklahoma,
Texas and other western states.
ELEVEN ENGINEERS MKE
ALL 'A'GRAELST YEAR
ERWIN DREESE COMrETES
FOURTH YEAR OF PERFECT
GRADES'
Of all the professional schools of
the University that keep open records,
the enginering college is the only one
that reports any all "A" students for
last semester. Five seniors, one jun-
ior, three sophomores, and two fresh-
men make up the list of eleven.
They are, class of '20: L. 0. Case,
E.E. Dreese, W. R. Mason, F. I.
Sheahan, M. B. Stout; class.Df '21:
. B. Whinery; class of '22: P. . Dav-
is, R. M. Hazen, G. W. McCordie;
clas sof '23: W. A. Cotton and H. W.
Jackson.
The two freshmen and Sheahan also
drew straight "A's" for the first se-
mester, while it is the distinction of

Erwin Dreese to have never received
a different mark during the four years
in the University. He is at present
an instructor in the engineering col-
lege.
22 Men Last Year
It is interesting to note that during
the first semester of 1919-20 there
were 22 all "A" men in this college;
in 1918-19 there were seven for the
first and 13 for the last half of the
year; while during the whole of 1917-
18 seven each semester is recorded.
In the Summer school of 1920 19 men
won the distinction.
It is the policy of the Law school
not to disclose the names of men who
win perfect records.
Greater Newark Club Meets Today
Convening for the first time this
year, members of the Greater Newark
club of New Jersey, will meet at 8
o'clock tonight in room 306 of the Un-
ion, when plans for the year will be
discussed.

FATHER OF PROF.
H. E. RIGGS DIES
Judge Samuel A. Riggs, father of
Henry E. Riggs, professor of civil eng-
ineering, died yesterday morning at
the Washtenaw private hospital, after
a prolonged illness, at the age of 85.
Judge Riggs, who was a pioneer in
Kansas, was born- March 1, 1835, in
Hanging Rock, Ohio. Educated at
Marietta and Jefferson colleges, anc.
e Cincinnati law school, he went to
Kansas in 1895. Judge Riggs was a
prominent member of the Br associ-
Short funeral services were con-
ducted by ,Rev. Lloyd Douglas of the{
'on gr:?atin l church at Dolph's
,hapel on Maynard street at 8 o'clock
last tilhd. Relatives left with the
body this morning for Lawrence,
Kans:, the old home of the deceased.
FRESHMNINSTRUICTION
FEATUR1ESSUPPLMENT,
STORIES OF CAMPUS INTEREST
IN FIRST BIG ISSUE OF
YEAR
Tomorrow the first Sunday Sipple-
ment of The Daily will be issued. At
the present time The Daily is the only
college newspaper issuing a supple-
ment, having "originated and carried
out the idea last year.
Prominent among the features in to-
morrow's supplement will be an art-
icle written by "Duke" Dunne, per-
sonally, on the treatment accorded the
Olympic contenders from the United
States during their transportation to
the games on the U. S. S. S. Princess
Matoilka.
Attention will also be devoted to
the instruction of the freshmen
through posting them on teh tradi-
tions and customs of Michigan. The
supplement will endeavor to give them
pointers which will prove useful and
informative.
Nor will the alumni be neglected
on the other hand, as there will be
articles concerning them. Then, of
course, there will be the usual big
stories from time to time of activities
on the campus wit hspecial features,
interviews, literary criticisms, and
movie write-ups.
The main idea behind the supple-
'nent will be to make it an even bet-
ter paper in its second year than it
was the first and inaugural year.
Fresh The Goats
Of Gargoyle Wit
When Gargoyle fans pick up the in-
itial 1920 number of the humour mag-
azine, to be placed on sale Wednes-
day, Oct. 22, they will be greeted with
a three color cover, executed by Lee
Boyd, '22, portraying one of the many
faux pas of the freshman during his
first few weeks at the University.
Backing up their boast of having
the best art staff of any college pub-
lication in the country, the Gargoyle
men are offering a double page fea-
ture by Waldo Gower, '23. The usual
line of humour is also promised, in
addition to numerous columns of col-
lege wit.
The October number is dedicated to
the freshmen, and uses the latter as
the butt for its jokes and cartoons.
Subscriptions to the Gargoyle will
be taken daily at the office in the
Press building. Tryouts for both the
editorial and business staffs are re-
quested to report at the same place.

ADVISERS TO AID
FRESHMAN CLASS
Forty committeemen assisted by 400
advisers from the senior and the jun-
ior- classes will direct the steps of the
present freshman classes throughout
the year.
The committee appoitned by the
Union will try to foster Michigan spir-
it in the yearlings and to acquaint
them with Michigan's possibilities and
activities. Beginning next week the
committeemeni, made up of represent-
ative men on the campus, will visit
their respective charges at least twice
each week and seek to aid them in
any way possible.
The plan will be explained at the
lit and engineer assemblies next week,
and offices -for the committee will be
maintained in the Union after that
date.

INDIAS HOPEFUL
ON OWNGROUNDS
Cleveland Radiates Confidence as;
Speaker's Men Return from hard
Fight on Foreign Soil
TICKETS FOR FOURTH GAME
OF SERIES AT BIG PREMIUM
Cleveland, Oct. 8.-Safely entrench-
ed upon their own reservations, the
Cleveland Indians will renew theiri
battle for World Series honors here
tomorrow. The Brooklyn Nationals,
conquerors of the Speaker tribe in,
two of the three games, are likely to
find their rivals a far different com-
bination from that which fell twice
before the attacks of the Robins at
Ebbets field.
Cleveland Radiates Confidence
Cleveland fairly i'diates confidence
tonight, and the Indians cannot fail
to be inspired to greater baseball by
the calm assurence and backing which
refuses to concede further defeat
for the home team. Every atom of
World Series atmosphere, so utterly
lacking during the first three contests
in Brooklyn, has reappeared at the
western end of the circuit. Cleveland
and its citizens are prepared to show
the baseball world what home backing
and rooting will do towards uplifting
the players' morale and putting a win-
ning touch into the attack of the In-
dians.
Hotels are swamped tonight by the
rush of fans from other- cities, and
ticket speculators take their lives in
their hands every time they show the
corner of a seat coupon. Although
the baseball amphitheater holds less
than 30,000 spectators, fully half that
number of out of town fans are here
tonight, clamoring for a place to sleep
and a chance to buy a ticket at any
price. Tickets are still to be had but
at a cost which would stagger the
baseball fan of mid-summer. Single
seats were offered for sale at from
$15.00 to $35.00 according to the loca-
tion.
Robins Workout
Wilbert Bobinson had the Brook-
lynites out for preliminary maneuvers
this afternoon. All he would say was:
"We have the winning edge now and
expect to hold it."
It-was expected that Speaker would
select Coveleskie as the Indians'
pitcher tomorrow, and Pfeffer or
Mammaux was expected to pitch for
Brooklyn.
Close followers of baseball who
have viewed the present series to date
with impartial eyes expressed the op-
inion tonight that the super-pennant
will be won and lost next week in
Brooklyn rather than during the
Cleveland series.
Poetry Fan Fools
'Egm This Year

MICHIGAN READY
FOR CASE ELEVEN

Scientists
But

Not Particularly Strong,
Will Be First Test
for Varsity

GAME STARTS AT 2:30 P. M.
CENTRAL STANDARD TIME1
THE LINE-UP
Michigan Position Case
Cappon .........L.E.. Houriet (Capt.),
Goetz.........L.T..........Boehm
Dunne........L.G.........Droege
Vick ...........C........Edwards
Wilson........R.G........Grabiel
Wieman ........R.T..........Taylor
Goebel ......... R.E............Byrns
Dunn.........Q.B:........Houtiet
Usher ..........L.H......Cobbledick
Cohn .........R.H...... .. Schwier
Nelson.......F.B..........Cohen
Michigan's 1920 Varsity-the team
on which the Wolverine supporters'
are pinning their hopes for a come-
back which will take some of the
sting out of last year's gridiron de-
feats will receive its first test in the
game with Case this afternoon.
- No Reserved Seats
The contest will begin at 2:30
o'clock Central Standard time, which
is 3:30 o'clock Ann Arbor time. There
are no reserved seats. Students need
merely present their athletic books
with coupon 1 signed, while others
may secure tickets at the gate.
More interest is being shown in
this contest than in any other Case
game for several years, as it will give
:Wolverine supporters a good line on
the team to which they are looking
for revenge on the Conference schools
which defeated Michigan last season.
Little is known of the real strength
of the eleven which Yost has been de-
veloping for the. past three weeks, but
the opinion is prevalent that it is not
a weak one. At all events the tilt
with Case will tell.
The opponents are not particular-
ly strong, according to what little
dope is available. Dennison whipped
the Cleveland school 7 to 0 last week,
and the victorious eleven is not un-
usually strong.
Best Line-Up to Start
Yost is putting his strongest line-
up into the field. Steketee, who is not
going to play because of a bruised
shoulder, is the only regular that will
not start the game. Nelson who will
take his place, is a capable substi-
tute and is expected to show especial-
ly well on the defense. Jack Dunn,
at quarter, is the man to whom all
eyes will be turned when Michigan
gets the ball, as his running, kicking,
and capable handling of the team in
practice has led Michigan followers
to expect great things of him. Abe
Cohn and Ed Usher, the halves, are
more or less familiar to Wolverine
crowds. They can be relied on for
consistent gains through the lines and
an occasional successful end run.
(Continued on page three)
Yell Leaders In
Demand Today

ADDRESS CHANGES
MUST BE IN TODAY
This morning will be the last op -
portunity for mnaking changes or cor-
rections in addresses or telephone
numbers for the Students' Directory.
It will also be the latest time to
hand in the names of members of fra-
ternities, sororities, dormitories, and
house clubs.1
The staff is desirous of having all
these corrections handed in at once
as the preliminary work on this year's
book has been completed and a part
of it has already gone to press. It is
expected that the Directory will be
completed early in November.
COMMITTEETO AID
ONROOM QUESTIONI,
Board to Act as Arbitrator Between
Housekeepers and Student
Body
TWO SIDES TO ROOM RENT
QUESTION IS ARGUMENT
A meeting of all Ann Arbor room-
ing house keepers was held yesterday
inSarah Caswell Angell hall for the
purpose of acquainting them with the
functions of the new rooming com-
mittee Col. Joseph Bursley presided
at the meeting which developed into
quite a lengthy scontroversy. The
point at issue was that there were
two sides to the rent profiteer ques-
tion, as in the majority of cases
rooms must demand a higher price in
view of the increasing costs of ma-
terial. The ladies objected stren-
uously to the idea that they were
profiteering landladies.
The women elected Mrs. Emma
Yerex to serve as their representative
on the rooming committee which now
comprises Col. Joseph Bursley, James
McClintock, '21L, student representa-
tive, and Mrs Yerex. This board will
act as arbitrator between the student
and the rooming house keepers and
it is hoped that in this manner many
of the disputes may be settled. An
unusually large number of students
have been leaving their rooms this
year because of the varying scale of
prices.
Col. Bursley assured the women
that the university, acting through
the committee, would see that each
dispute was treated fairly and square-
ly This committee will endeavor to
eliminate all controversies between
the student and the rooming house
keepers.
SOPHOMORES TO CH
CONDUCT OF FRESHMEN
COMMITTEE OF 30 MEN TO HEAR
CHARGE OF UNDERCLASS
DISCIPLINE

GUARD COMPOSED
OF,]102_STUDE-NTS
FIFTY STUDENTS FROM LITERARY
COLLEGE FORM LARGEST
GROUP
MEMBERS OF GUARD TO
DRILL MONDAY AT 4:15
2,500 Tickets to be Distributed Among
Michigan Students and
- Faculty
Announcement was made yesterday
afternoon by Dr. George B. May of a
list of 102 students who will form the
guard of honor in the academic pro-
cession preceding the inauguration of
President Marion L. Burton next
Thursday morning. The list includes
50 students from the literary depart-
ment, 24 engineer, 10 law, 8 medical
and 10 dental students.
Drill Monday Afternoon
Men whose names appear in the list
will be expected to appear at the of-
fice of Shirley W. Smith, secretary of
the University, in University hall at
4:15 o'clock Monday afternoon for
drill under the direction of Dr. May.
The guard, like the guard of honor in
commencement processions, attired in
caps ahd gowns and carrying pen-
nants, will escort the invited guests
in the academic procession. Seats
will be reserved on the main floor of
Hill Auditorium for the members of
the guard, and they will be the only
students participating in the proces-
sion. Prof. L. M. Gram is chief mar-
shal.
Notice of the means o fdistribution
to students of 2,500 tickets for the in-
augural session appears in The Daily
Official Bulletin this morning. It is
desired that these tickets be distrib-
uted proportionately among the class-
es. Arrangement for distribution of
tickets to wives of the faculty and
other members of the university com-
munity will be made the first of the
week.

"Don't take Dr. Wier for rhetoric
unless you like poetry," has been a
familiar saying on the campus for sev-
eral years. Although Dr. Wier has
taught poetry in his rhetoricclasses
for 10 years, he has decided to teach
only prose this year. Many people
have told Dr. Wier that he could not
get along without his poetry so he
has decided to show them that he can.
"There were of course many in my
classes who were disappointed when
I announced that I would teach only
prose this year," said Dr. Wier, "and
there were also those who were not
disappointed."
Every year Dr. Wier has let the stu-
dents choose whether or not they
wanted poetry for the next year, and
always the choice was for it because
it made such a "unique rhetoric
course," as many students said.
"Now," said Dr. Wier, "I will have to
make a unique course out of teaching
prose alone."
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT
PREDICTS RECORD CORN CROP
Washington, Oct. 8-The 1920 corn
crop promises to be the largest in
the history of the country by more
than 90 million bushels. A yield of
3,216,192,000 bushels compared with
the previous record production of 3,-
124,746,000 bushels in 1912 was fore-
cast today by the Department of
Agriculture. The yield will exceed
that of last year by practically 300
million bushels.

It was discovered at a late hour
last night that Micihgan had no yell
leader who could be depended upon
for the Case game this afternoon.
There is an urgent need of students
to act, in this capacity and Student
councilman Fred Petty, '21, will hold
a try out at 10 o'clock this morning
in the Union.
All students who have the ability
to lead yells should be present at the
meeting, as it will be necessary to
have men at the game in the after-
noon. The room in which the meet-
ing is to be held will be posted on
the bulletin board in the Union.
ATHLETIC COMMITTEE MAKES
PLANS FOR COMING YEAR
Robert Cook, '21E, was elected
chairman of the Student Committee
on Athletic Affairs at a meeting held
yesterday afternoon. Cook will re-
place Russell Barnes, '20, who did not
return to school. Plans were also
laid for the work to be carried on this
year which, it is expected, will re-
quire more activity than ever in the
past.

Plans for the suppression of mobj
discipline and for the administeringl
of proper punshment to disobedient
freshmen were outlined by the soph-
omore committee on underclass con-
duct at a meeting held last night.
The committee consists of 30 men
from the sophomore class working
under the supervision of Robert J.
Dunne, '22, student councilman. The
committeemen have the power of stu-
dent councilmen in the suppression of
mob discipline and any sophomores
reported by them will be summoned
before the student council and will
severely dealt with.
Frequent meetings will be held by
the committee at which every mem-
ber must either be present or forfeit
his standing as a member, for the,
purpose of giving proper treatment
-to unruly yearlings. The -names of
freshmen not obeying Michigan tradi-
tions will be reported to members of
the committee or will be brought up
at a meeting of the class of '23. If
the freshman repeats his offense, af-
ter being wa ned, he will be severely
dealt with in private. It is hoped,
by the Student council, that all soph-
omores will cooperate with -the coin-
mittee in a mobless but efficient sys-
tem of discipline.
Correction
It was stated in last Wednesday's
issue of The Daily that the salary of
the general secretary of the Union
had been $300 per month. That office
paid $150 per month last year.

Final Details Settled
Many final details in connection
with plans for-the inauguration were
settled at a meeting yesterday after-
noon of the executive committee in
charge. Dean E. H. Kraus, chairman
of the committee, stated that' all stu-
dents will be expected to show their
loyalty to Michigan by attending the
inaugural session or turning out for
the aacdemic procession.
The list of men comprising the
guard of honor follows:
Literary-: B. Jeavons, C. M. Camp-
bell, L. E. Swift, W. C. Abbot, C. H.
Rorick, T. I. Underwood, 0. E. Gates,
F. M. Thompson, H. H. Hulbert, R. W.
Kneebone, J. A. Avery, A. R. Laurie,
I. S. Kyser E. F. Perkins, A. G. Wen-
ley, E. K. Armstrong, L. A. Schmidt,
A. P. Cook, A. C. Jacobs, D. C. Shel-
don, B. H. Logan, H. T. Stock, C. S.
Baxter, B. F. Fields, J. E.tMcManis,
R. C. Angell, A. E. Pierpont, L. M.
oodruffA. Khuen, B. W. Winter, E.
L. Luther, W. Ingham, D. J. Thorp,
K. A. Dietrich, E. S. Witt, L. C. An-
derson, C. E. Irvin, H. Weeks, B. H.
Wilson, F. S. Fletcher, J. A. Stewart,
T. C. Sedgwick, D. P. Joyce, F. B.
Wickham, T. D. Hinshaw, F. P. G.
Lattner, F. J. Petty, J. P. Winchell,
F. L. Brewer, R. G. Yerkes.
Engineers: M.D. Van Wagoner, G.
D. Kennedy, E. A. Krueger, H. G.rMc-
Nanee, C. W. Bieser, S. Irvine, M. E.
McGowan, L. J. Schindler, S.. D. Por-
ter, R. B. Alexander, E. M. Hampton,
J. W. Kennedy, E.- A. Kerbey, J. A.
Barger, L. S. Lukins, C. N. Johnston,
E. F. Moore, D. A. Longenesker, K
H. Pilkington, R. F. Grindley, Ray-
mond Smith,. R. B. Marshall, M. B
Covell, A. F. King.
Laws: D. L. WoQd, L. Mattern, G. B
Wolfe, C. G. Brandt I. LE. Levine, F. L
Walters, E. M. Martineck, T. B. Doyle
R. M. Lewis, R. F. Matthews. -
Medics: C. J. Marinees, L. E. Hol-
ly, A. Ruedemann, W. E. Kuechen
meister, T. W. Durbin, E. P. Russell
M. G. Sheldon, George Gerken.
Dents: H. -0. Erbland, G. G. Mc
Knight, R. C. Gorman, E. T. Furey
E. S. Forsyth, D. H. Bellinger, C. J
McCann, H. M. Gotschall, B. Weiss
H. G. Hinckley.

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