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November 30, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-30

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THE WEATHER
RAIN; PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

I

VA
r 131k ioan

:3atix

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT IV IR
SERVYICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 48. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1920. PRICE FIVE CEl

I

I

ULTIMTTUM SAYS
RALWY DISPUTES
MUST BE SETTLEU
"ULTRA CONSERVATIVES" CLAIh
DECISION SHOULD COME
IMMEDIATELY
STONE THREATENS TO
STOP CONTROLING MEN
Brotherhood Chief States That Rules
Are Necessary Before Signing
of Wage Agreement
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Nov. 29.-Warning that the
"ultra conservative" leaders of the
railroads unions would cease their
efforts to hold the railroad men in
check unless some plan to adjust dif-
ferences between roads and their em-
ployes were found, was delivered to
the United States Railroad board by
Warren G. Stone, grand chief of the
Brotherhood of Railway Engineers.
Sixteen Unions Represented
Appearing before the board with of-
ficials of 15 other recognized railway
unions, Mr. Stone announced that aft-
er being classed "for 17 years as an
'ultra conservative' I have arrived at
the point where I am through making
excuses to the men.
"There must be some plan followed
whereby we can get results for these
men," Mr. Stone continued. "The Lo-
comotiverEngineers have carried the
load of responsibility for years. We
have tried to embody your decisions
of last July in agreement with 358
railroads but only four of these agree-
ments have been signed. The roads
refuse to sign until thesboard passes
on the question of rules."
The decision last July raised rail-
road wages $600,000,000.
Asks Board for Hearing
With Mr. Stone the officials of the
other organizations are asking that
the board call a hearing to decide on
the creation of national boards of ad-
justment, which would hear and pass
on controversies other than wage dis-
putes. The board agreed to an imme-
diate executive hearing on the re-
quest, and if it is decided to comply,
an early hearing will be arranged.
BURTON OUTLINES HIS
POLICY FO R FACULTY
Future policy of the University and
the details of the University budget
now up before the state legislature
were presented to members of the
faculties and teaching staffs of the
University at a meeting yesterday
afternoon in the Natural Science aud-
itorium by President Marion L. Bur-
ton.
The purpose of the meeting was to
acquaint all members of the teaching
staffs with the ends which the Uni-
versity has in view. President Bur-
ton expressed the feeling that the suc-
cessful carrying out of these plans
depends upon their being understood
by those intimately connected with the
University so that the latter will know
toward what end to work.
The points brought up were those
that have been given out lately in

connection with the appropriation the
University is asking from the legis-
lature.
FRESH MEET TODAY
There will be a meeting of the
freshman literary class at 4
o'clock today in University hall
auditorium.

I

QUESTION OF EASTERN ATHLETIC

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COMPETITION EXCITES INTEREST

PRESS QONVENTION
OPEN TO STUDENTS

I

{'NGLIII TEACHERS
MEET IN CHICAGO

(By S. T. V.)
With the meeting at which the Con-
ference athletic schedules will be
made for the next year less than a
week away, considerable interest is
being manifested on the compus in
I the question of eastern competition.
Last year Michigan was not repre-
sented in the Eastern Intercollegiate
track meet, causing a great deal of
comment among students and alumni
Unless she is represented this year
she will be dropped from the list, as
the intercolle'giate rules provide that
a member team must be entered at
least every other year.e
Chicago Plays Tiger
Moreover, Chicago has scheduled a
"home and home" game with Prince-
ton, and there are various rumors
afloat that a game between Harvard
and Illinois on the same basis is not
improbable. Naturally the students
are interested in the attitude of the
Board in Control of Athletics.
When asked for his opinion on the
tNoted Pianist
j Here In Extra
Concert Series
(By L. L N.)
Percy Grainger, the distinguished
Australian pianist, who has been mak-
ing a remarkable name for himself
among the great performers of his
day, will be heard for the first time
in Ann Arbor, at 8 o'clock Thursday7
evening, in Hill auditorium in the
Extra Concert series.
Mr. Grainger, still a young man,
first attracted attention in Australia.
Later he toured Great Britian and the
continent and then was heard in South
Africa. Returning to Europe, he was
induced to come to America a few
years ago where he at once attracted
great attention.
He is a diligent worker, and in ad-
dition to his attainments as a per-
former of first rank, he has also won
recognitionras a composer and con-
ductor. Many of his great orchestralt
compositions have been given theirt
premierstunder his own direction. Het
has wielded the baton over practic-
ally every renowned orchestra inf
Europe as guest conductor.c
In addition he has given much at-<
tention to the study of folk songs and
primitive music. He has built an ex-
ceedingly attractive program for his
Ann Arbor debut.l
The program follows:
"Organ Prelude in Fugue, D maj-
or, "Bach - Busoni, "Humoresque,3
Gardiner; "Prelude, De Profundis,"I
Gardiner; "A Fragment, 'When thef
Sun's Gone Down'," Kramer; "Jubaa
Dance," Dett; "Variations on a Themet
by Paganini, Op. 35, Book 1," Brahms;
"El Albaicin" from "Iberia," Albeniz;d
"Country Grandees," "One More Day,t
My John," Grainger; "Leprechaun's t
Dance," "March-Jig, 'Maguire's Kick',"e
Stanford-Grainger.d
R. 0. T. C. RECEIVES VARIETY F
OF NEW ARMY EQUIPMENT t
Several items of equipment have
been received by the R. 0. T. C. corpsc
within the last few days and are nowi
being unpacked and inspected beforee
being put on exhibit.c
The new equipment consists of a 1550
millimeter G. P. F. gun for the coastd
artillery and a five-ton Holt tractor.
These pieces of artillery will soon beI
stored on the campus, where they
may be inspected by the students. An
eight-inch howitzer is expected to ar-
rive in a short time.I
More than 100 students have signi-. f
fled their intention to join the pro- f

posed aero unit and an application for9
the unit has been made by the R. 0. 1
T. C. officers in charge. A govern-
ment officer will inspect the organiza-
tion later in the year and pass on its
relative merits as compared with oth-
er applicants throughout the country. t

subject, P. G. Bartelme, athletic di-
rector, said: "The question as to
whether Michigan will be represented
in the Eastern Intercollegiate meet
next spring is one for the board to
decide at its meeting, Dec. 11. There
are several things to be considered
in connection with the matter, and I
can hardly say what the outcome will
be until the facts are presented. You
may rest assured though that the date
of the eastern meet will be kept open
until a decision is reached.
Eastern Game Probable
"In regard to a baseball game with
one of the representative colleges in
the east, I think that one would be
scheduled if suitable arrangements
could be made. Our regular schedule
is pretty heavy and it might prove
rather difficult to work in an eastern
game. Last year we' averaged three
games a week, during the regular sea-
son. Due to the fact that school
closes here about a week later than
the eastern schools, it is hard to get
a post season game with them, al-
though it has been done on one or two
occasions in the past."
Mr. Bartelme also said that, if an
alliance similar to that of Chicago
and Princeton could be made with
some of the larger eastern universi-
ties, that there would be no doubt of
its acceptance by the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics.
Favors No Conference Sacrifice
"Generally speaking," said Prof.
Ralph W. Aigler, chairman of the
Board in Control of Athletics, "I am
not opposed to eastern competition as
such, but if it entails, a sacrifice of
Conference competition I am not in;
favor of it.
(Continued on Page Eight)
NO DECISION THIS
YEAR IN DEBATES,
No decisions will be rendered in
conference debates held under the'
auspices of the Central or Mid-west'
Debating leagues this year according
to the recent ruling of the officials of
the conference. This is the first time
that this plan has been tried in con-
ference circles and for that reason the
decision is for only one year, but in
case the plan works out as well as
is expected the ruling will in all prob-
ability become a permanent one.
The new system of debating, as"
planned by the conference debating
officials, is not an untried experiment1
as it has been tried for a number of1
years in some of the colleges of theE
West. Nebraska and Iowa were the
first to debate under no decision rulesI
and such a system has proved advan-
tageous in those institutions.
Though no decisions are to be f'en-
dered in the conference debates, in-
terest in these affairs is not expected£
to lag, for emphasis will still be put
on the subject matter and the art oft
debating even though the actual win-t
ner is not to be determined. The
plan as outlined tends to shift the in-
terest from the decision to the actual
subject matter of the debates. t
Little or no opposition was en-
countered by those in favor of try-
ng the new plan when it was offer-1
ed to the debating officials of the
conference for approval and all of ther
ofilcials seemed to favor no decisionc
debates at least for one year.
LAW REVIEW ASSOCIATION
WILL GIVE DINNER TONIGHTt
The student editors of the MichiganY
Law Review and members of the lawt
faculty will be the guests of the Law.
Review association at a dinner to bef

given at 6:15 o'clock tonight in the
Union.
A. J. Levin, '19L, and E. G. Kemp,
14L, of Detroit, and G. A. Ohlinger,
02L, of Toledo, former student edi-
ors of the Review, will be the out-of-
own guests.

Brumm Invites All Students
tend Meet Beginning
Tomorrow

to At.

SCHERMERHORN AND FACULTY
MEMBERS WILL GIVE TALKS
Students who are in any way inter-
ested in the work of metropolitan
newspapers are urged to attend any
of the open meetings of the Univer-
sity Press club of Michigan, which is
holding its convention here Wednes-
day, Thursday and Friday of this
week, according to Prof. John L.
Brumm, head of the department of
journalism and president of the or-
ganization.
Open to All
"The opportunity of attending the
meetings of the Press club during
this week is not limited to students
taking courses in journalism. In fact
it is the wish of the club that as many
students in the University as possible
take interest in the work of the club
and attend the speeches given during
the convention.
"The talk of James Scheriqerhorn,
of the Detroit Times, to be given Wed-
nesday night will have in it much that
would appeal to students. Schermer-
horn has given a number of talks at
the University, being here several
times to speak before 'pep' meetings.
Facultymen to Talk
"Practically all of the other speech-
es given at the meeting of the club
are by members of the University fac-
ulty. These, however, all pertain to
the subject of newspaper work and
will be of value to any students who
are interested in this line."
The open meetings of the conven-
tion are any in which business of the
organization is not transacted. They
will be held every day in which the
convention is in session, the two busi-
ness sessions of the meeting being but
a small part of the program.
POST URGES GRAUAL
PROGRESS FOR LABOR
"The seemingly hopeless confusion
in the world today isareally only a
struggle for order," said Louis F.
Post, assistant secretary of labor, in
his lecture on "The Future of La-
bor," Sunday night in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium. "The world has to
get adjusted and to accomplish this it
must go through a period of recon-
struction."
Mr. Post said that to intelligently
speak about labor one must know
what the word means. He defines it
as human, energy expended for the
satisfaction of wants. "Looking at it
in this light," he continued, "the
truth is evident that everyone who
does useful work is a laborer Includ-
ing professional men, business men,
and public officials."
"What we must do is to clearly see
the goal-the right direction-and
gradually .move toward it as a mass.
Then, and not until then, will the line
between men and employers be elim-
inated so that both will work as one
mind for the help of a common
cause."
New Exhibit Placed in Library
An exhibit on the "Modern Illus-
tration" will be placed in the main
corridor of the Library today and will
remain there until Christmas vaca-
tion.
SENIOR LITS MEET
The senior lit class will meet
at 3 o'clock this afternoon in
the Natural Science auditorium.

Prof. F. N. Scott was in Chicago
last Friday and Saturday in attend-
ance at the tenth annual meeting of
the National Council of Teachers of
English. In the general session Fri-
day morning he made a report upon
the Anglo-American Conference of
Professors of English heli at the Uni-
versity of London last July, and at the
banquet in the evening acted as toast-
master.
The National Council now has a
membership of over 1,100. It publish-
es a highly successful monthly mag-
azine called the English Journal and
issues from time to time monographs,
reports, and bibliographies on various
phases of the teaching of English.
Professor Scott was one of the found-
ers of the council, presided at the
meeting when it was organized, and
for two years was its president. He.
was also one of the founders of the
English Journal, -and has been on its
editorial staff from its beginning.
The president of the council for;
next year is Prof. H. G. Paul, of the3
University of Illinois, a graduate ofj
the University in the literary class ofj
1897.
UNION HOST TOMOROW3
TO MEMBERSHIP TEMS
In recognition of their services dur-
ing the recent life membership drive, a
dinner will be given tomorrow even-
ing by the Union to all participantsE
in the campaign. A program of mu-
sic and specialty stunts has been ar-
ranged to liven up the affair, andl
talks will be made by President Mar-
ion L. Burton, W. A. C. Miller, '04, oft
Detroit, and Paul Eaton, '21, presi-f
dent of the Union. Maynard Newton,
'22, chairman of the drive, will act as'l
toastmaster.
George Rogers, '21E, and his or-l
chestra will furnish music during thet
evening, and Rans Sherman, '23, is on
the program for a few stunts.
Invitations will be mailed today to1
the men who worked in the cam-
paign. Each team of solicitors will
be allotted a table.1
The dinner will be held at 6 o'clock
in the Union assembly hall.
School Of Jiusic
Offers Recital

FIFTEEN KILLED
BY SINN FEIINERS
. IITIN PROTEST RIOT!L
WILLIAM SEARS, MEMBER 0
IRISH PARLIAMENT,
ARRESTED

BRITISH PARLIAMENT
FORBIDDEN TO PUBLIC
Police Report Murders of Police
Cadets by Enfilading Fire by
Ambushed Party
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Nov. 29. - Raids and ar-
rests continued in Dublin today.
Among the persons taken into cus-
tody were William Sears, Sinn Fein
member of Parliament for the South-
ern Division of County Mayo. Mr.
Sears in 1919 was sentenced to six
months' imprisonment on a charge of
inciting persons to shoot the mili-
tary, the police and government of-
ficials.
Fifteen or so police were killed and
one cadet mortally wounded as the
result of an ambush by between 70
and 100 men near Kilmichael, south-
west of Macroom, last night. Another
of the cadets is missing. The auxil-
iary cadets are troops in training for
the "Black and Tan" auxiliary police.
Parliament Galleries Closed
London, Nov. 29.-After a confer-
ence of government officials at the
residence of Premier Lloyd George
today on Sinn Fein developments in
England, it was decided to close the
galleries of the house of commons
to the public. Members of the com-
mons will only be able to interview
their constituents in the outer lobby.
Persons having business in the house
who are unknown to the police will
be searched. Motor traffic through
the palace yards also will be sub-
jected to special observation. The
house of lords will adopt similar
precautions.
Cadets Killed
The conference was attended by the
premier, Winston Spencer Churchill,
secretary of war, Hamar Greenwood,
chief secretary of Ireland, and heads
of the metropolitan police and Scot-
land Yard.
Dispatches relating to the killing
of police cadets in Ireland were read
in the house of commons by Sir Ha-
mar Greenwood in the course of the
Irish debate today. The party which
ambushed the cadets consisted of
nearly 100 men all dressed in khaki
and wearing trenchhelmets. They
fired from both sides of the road on
the lorries and also directed enfilad-
ing fire.

(By L. L. f.)
The first public recital given by
the students of the School of Music
will take place at 4:15 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon, Dec. 1, in the School
of Music auditorium, when a number
of talented students from the' violin,
piano, and voice departments will un-
ite in offering a program of unusual
interest.
This will be the first recital to be
heard in the School of Music audi-
torium since the completion of exten-
sive alterations, which were begun
early last summer. The general pub-
lis is cordially invited..
The following program will be of-
fered:
In Autumn ...........Moszkowsky
Mazurka .......................Liszt
Max A. Ewing
To the Nightengale ........Brahms
A Maiden's Song ............Brahms
Mrs. Pearl Wolcott
Gavotte, E major, from Sixth
Solo-Sonata ..................Bach
Neva Nelson
La Marta Nella Vita Mia......Costa
Kemp Keena
Sonata, Op. 90 (first move-
ment)................Beethoven
Anna Broene
My Peace Thou Art........
Death and the Maiden.......Schubert
Doris Howe
Romance, F major, Op. 50 ....
...................... Beethoven
Bertrand Bronson

TAU BETA PIS ENGINEERING
SOCIETY, INITIATES TODAY
Following its initiation today in the
Engineering building, at which 11
new members will -be taken in, Tau
Beta Pi, Engineer honor society, will
hold a banquet at 7 o'clcok in the
Union.
The Tau Beta Pi formal, which will
take place Dec. 10 in Packard hall,
will consist of a reception for the
members of the Engineering faculty
and a dance. The committee consists
of R. B. Marshall, '21E, chairman; T.
R. Gustafson, '21E, E. F. Moore, '21E,
and J. H. Pilkington, '21E.
123E MEETS
Dean M. E. Cooley will address
the second assembly of the soph-
omore engineers at 9 o'clock this
morning in room 348, Enigneer-
ing building. Appointments to
committees announced after the
meeting.

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