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November 28, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TrHE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PLAN NINE GR
GAMES FOR 192

1

argo Crowds Desiring to See Games
Makes Longer Schedule
Feasible
'ROPOSITION NOW UP TO CON.
FERENCE GOVERNING BOARD
Coach Yost will lead his warriors
irough a nine game schedule next
ear, if proposals which are to be
aade to the Big Ten Ruling board
t the next meeting are accepted.
Eivery Conference school has re-
orted receipts from football games
his fall that exceed anything in the
istory of the sport, some institutions
eing unable to meet the demand for
ig game tickets, and it is believed
hat the longer schedule would give
very enthusiast desiring to see a
ame a chance to do so. Under the
resent system students at some uni-
ersities do not see their team in ac-
on more than three times during the
all campaign, this condition neces-
arily exists because some of the
arger and older colleges draw enor-
ious crowds for any attraction and
eel called upon to play a large per-
entage of their games at home.
A nine game schedule would give
very Big Ten team a chance to work
a three good practice games and
till have an opportunity to meet all
' the best Conference elevens, a fea-
ire that would eliminate some of the,
iple ties that have confused follow-
rs of the game in the past.
Authors of the plan are confident
iat the ruling board will accept the
ew schedule. They point to the
hanging tendency toward long sched-
tes in the last few years. When the
form movement swept western foot-
ill some 15 years ago each Confer-
ice eleven was limited to five gamesy
er year, after a few years after a few
ears the limit was raised to seven
id now, it is believed, is the time to
Id two more contests.

'MICHIGAN MEN TO BE ENTERED
IN DETROIT ATHLETIC SWIM
Swimming practice, which started
last Tuesday afternoon with a large
turnout, will continue this week with
practices on Monday, Tuesday, Thurs-
day, and Friday in the pool, and on
Wednesday afternoon in the gymnas-
ium.
Entry blanks have been received for
Saturday's city championshipsat the
Detroit Athletic club and Coach Dru-
lard plans to make about six entries.
Hyde will probably represent Michi-
gan in the 100 yard free style and the
50 yard handicap, and Hubbard looks
like a sure starter in the 220 yard
swim. The Wolverines will probably
look to White to win out in the dives
and several other entries may be
made. Tuesday's Daily will contain
an announcement of all men entered.
FARRELL ISSUES
CALL FOR TRACK
Coach Steve Farrell, veteran train-
er of Michigan track and field teams,
announced the opening of the 1921
season, by issuing a call for candi-
dates for the squad, to meet Monday
afternoon, in Waterman gymnasium.
While still in the dark as to the
strength of the material with which
he will have to work this year, the
coach expects a good season, though
he will be without a high point scor-
er, such as he had last year in the
person of Carl Johnson. The loss of
Johnson and Cook will mean that
Losch is the only .sprinter remaining,
and there will be an unusually good
opportunity for short distance men.
No indoor meets will be held be-
fore the first of the new year, but with
the length of time that the squad now
has to prepare, the men should be in
excellent condition by the time that a
foe is met on the track.
DELTA CHI AND PHI SIGMA
KAPPA PLAY SOCCER FINALS
Finals in the interfraternity soccer
tournament will be played off at 3
o'clock Monday when Delta Chi meets
Phi Sigma Kappa. These teams have
shown unusual strength and have
been able to wear down their oppon-
ents in the games previously played.
The championship game between
these two aggregations should be one
of the hardest fought and closest con-
tests yet played.
To the winner a cup will be award-
ed which is a permanent trophy ac-
cording to the ruling of the intramur-
al department.
In class B Phi Delta Theta meets
Phi Sigma Delta at 3:30 o'clock. Zeta
Psi plays Psi Upsilon and Alpha Del-
ta Phi is paired with Sigma Nu. The
contests between the last four teams
will start at 3 o'clock. In the class
games the upper lits meet the laws at
3 o'clock.
Typewriters of leading makes for
sale or rent. 0. D. Morrill, 17 Nickel's
A rcade.--Adv.

TWO WOLVERINES
ON AL-TIME 11
Heston and Schulz Selected by Coaches
Among Nine Greatest
Players
MICHIGAN AND YALE ONLY
SCHOOLS PLACING TWO MEN
Speaking from their experience ac-
quired in over 25 years of gridiron ob-
servations, four powers of football
have named an all time All-American
eleven. The men who have thus ded-
icated their opinions to the sport are:
Fielding H. Yost, who needs no in-
troduction to Michigan men, Glenn
Warner of Pittsburg, John W. Heis-
man of Pennsylvania and "Big Bill"
Edwards of Princeton fame.
Two Michigan stars are picked by
the critics as worthy of a place among
this galaxy of luminaries, Willie Hes-
ton, hailed by thousands as the great-
est half back the West has ever seen,
and Germany Schulz, who was the
bulwark of the Maize and Blue line,
12 years ago, are the Wolverines so
honored.
Among the many points of general
interest to football fans the unani-
mous selection of Jim Thorpe, the
Carlisle Indian star, stands out most
prominently. Thorpe is the only name
among the 31 mentioned by the ora-
cles that received the vote of each
coach. Next to Thorpe the stars most
favored were: Shevlin of Yale, Heffel-
finger of Yale, and Truxton Hare of
Pennsylvania; these men received
three votes each. Four others were
picked by two votes, Mahan of Har-
vard, Eckersall of Chicago and Heston
and Schulz of Michigan. Three posi-
tions were undetermined by the bal-
lots, one end and two tackles could
not be decided upon. Thirteen uni-
versities were represented by the 31

names mentioned, and of these only
four are inthe western ranks.
The all-time All-American eleven
then, as finally decided upon, with-
out an end and two tackles, would line
up like this:
Thorpe, Carlisle..............F.B.
Mahan, Harvard..............H.
Heston, Michigan..............R.H
Eckersall, Chicago.......... .Q.B.
Sevlin, Yale.................L.E.
Heffelfinger, Yale .............. R.Q.
Hare, Pennsylvania ...........L.G.
Schulz, Michigan .................C.
DIRECTORIES GO
ON SALE TUESDAY
The 1920-21 Students' Directory will
be placed on sale Tuesday, Nov. 30,
according to F. J. Pffuke, '21E, busi-
ness manager.
"The sale of the Directories has been
delayed unavoidably by printing con-
ditions," said Pfluke, "but they will be
placed on sale Tuesday."
The Directories will be sold for 75
cents a copy and may be purchased
from 10 to 5:30 o'clock at the follow-
ing places: The Engineering arch, in
front of the main library, at the end of
the diagonal walk on State street, in
University hall, and at the Union.

INTRAMURAL NOTICE
All fraternities wishing to en-
ter teams in the swimming and
bowling tournaments can do so
by calling the intramural office.
Phone 2268.

LEARN TO DANCE
Prof. Mittenthal's Schoolfor Danc-
ing Friday evenings. Class, 7:00 to
8:30. Class for Ann Arbor folks as
well as University students and also
married folks. You can take term,
half term or single lessons. Rates for
eight lessons: Gents, $8; ladies, $5.
Enroll now. Class growing rapidly.--
Adv.

E 1 I Patronize Daily advertisers.-Adv.
Christmas Will Soon Be Here
We carry a-fine tine of
FIRST-CLASS GOODS FOR CHRISTMAS PRESENTS
the useful kind that are most
apprciated by. your friends
JUST RECEIVED A LOT MORE OF THOSE
ARMY TOOL CHaESTS-- OUR PRICE $5.OO EACH
-moretantice as mu
THEY WILL NOT LAST LONG
We ca11rry ilnc lilll f
PRICES EIGHT SERVICE PROMPT
-a
M. D. LARNED
THE UP-TO-DATE HARDWARE
3 0 S. STATE STREET- PHONE 1610
- -
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the useul kin that ros
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BOWLINR NOTICE

Interclass and interfraternity
bowling tournaments will start
immediately after Thanksgiv-
ing. All teams expecting to en-
ter must notify the intramural
office at once
UNIVERSITY MEN! Best and saf-
est place to put your money is with
HURON VALLEY BLDG. & SAVINGS
ASSO. Dividends never less than 6
per et. Can withdraw money anytime
and receive 5 per ct. from day of in-
vestment. Win. L. Walz. Pres., H. H.
Herbst, Secy., Saving Bank Building.-
Adv.

)VERSEA
MEET

VETERANS
TUESDAY

A general social meeting of the
Richard N. Hall post, of the Veterans
of Foreign Wars, will be held at 7:30
o'clock Tuesday evening in the second
floor reading room of the Union. The
program includes two good speakers
and several musical numbers. All
men eligible for the organization will
be initiated at the close of the meet-
ing.
The post, charter which contains the
names of 180 University service men
is now being engraved at the national
headquarters and will probably arrive
in time for the meeting.
For live progressive up-to-date ad-
vertising use The Michigan Daily.-.

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m.--

Special Sale
sC
Collar Attached Shirts
Including
Flannels, Silk, Oxford and
Mradras Cloths

They are offered at big reduction

.__.

Especially
Especially

Carefull Work for
Careful People.

DONALDSON'S
711 N. UNIVE SITY

,.

.. . .
. ...

SWAIN
213 East University Avenue

Phone 2312

If it's anything photographic ask him about it

If you are NOT satisfied with the ordinary clothes, have Sam Burchfield & Co.

SKATES

make them for you, and you will get the best of tailoring talent, especially in
evening clothes. We can show you a large and fine line of woolens.
Prices are as low as possible, based on the present price of merchandise and

and

SKATING SHOES
The Best American and Canadian Makes

workmanship.

SKIS

Pine

Ash

Hickory

SAM BURCHFIELD & COMPANY

George J. Moe
711 N. Univ. Ave. Next to Arcade Theatre

106 East Huron Street

Down Town

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