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November 28, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-28

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CTION

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
PAY AND NIGHT ITIRE
SERVICE

ONE

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L. XXXI. No. 47.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1920.

PRICE FIVE C

S1NN FEI ,N PLOT
PLANS TO DAMAGE
DOCUMENTS DISCLOSING DETAILS
OF CONSPIRACY CAPTURED
DURING IRISH RAIDS
OFFICIALS THREATENED
IN NUMEROUS LETTERS

PRESIDENT BURTON PLEASED WITH
ATTITUDE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE

BRILLIANT ATTACK
WINS FOR LANSING

Are Protected by Barriers
by London
Police

Erected

(By Associated Press)
London, Nov. 27.-The capture dur-'
ing (raids in Ireland of Sin Fein doc-
uments alleged to give details of a
conspiracy for damaging government
buildings in England was said today
in police circles to be the cause of'
the erection of the 'formidable barri-'
cades which have been put up at the
entrances of Downing street and King
Charles street..
In addition to the plot reported in
the house of commons, Wednesday by
Sir Hamar dGreenwood, the chief sec-
retary for Ireland, for the destruction
of property in Liverpool and Man-
chester, it is stated in police quar-
ters that numerous other acts of ter-
rorism were being planned.
Offcials Threatened
According to published reports,
members of the government have re-
ceived a number of threatening let-
ters recently, but the officials are
maintaining silence on this subject.
It also is stated that sensational
discoveries have been made concern-
ing the activities of plotters in Lon-
don. In one case, according to the
police, motor cars were to have been
employed to transport bombers from
various parts of London to carry out
the destruction of the government
buildings.
Barriers Erected
Neither Premier Lloyd-George nor
other members of the government had
asked for the protection now afford-
ed by the barriers, it is declared, but
the police decided they were neces-
sary to protect the government's prop-
erty and the lives of the officials.
The houses of parliament were clos-
ed to the public today and many per-
sons coming up from the country were
refused admission.
This official action followed the de-
tention of a strange man in the outer
lobby of the house of commons yes-
terday.
ACOLYTES NOW
ADMIT WOMEN
For the first time in the history of
the organization, Acolytes, campus
philosophical society, will be open to
University women at its meeting Mon-
day night. The following women have
been invited to attend meetings of
the society: Mrs. Rosalind Kasauri,
Rose V. Gutterman, Elsa J. Haller,
Frances Stevens, Helen Kurtti.
Eight men will also be initiated at
this meeting. They are: E. A. Wal-
ter, grad., I. G. Walter, grad., C. A.
Madison, '21, B. H. Bronson, '21, L.
P. Waldo, '21, Oscar Brown, '21, and
G. Larkin, '21. Prof. R. M. Wenley,
head of the philosophical department,
will read a paper on "Ideals on Edu-
cation."
COUNCIL PICTURE
Student council picture will be
taken at 12:30 o'clock Monday, at
Spedding's studio.

"I am very well satisfied with our1
reception by the state budget commit-
tee Friday and their attitude," saidi
President Marion L. Burton yesterday
speaking of the trip to Lansing ofc
himself and five of the Regents for
the purpose of presenting the needs of
the University before them.
"We were also much gratified by
the action of the Michigan Manufact-
urers' association in sending a rep-1
resentation to Lansing to endorse our
program. This was particularly pleas
ing as they came entirely on their own
initiative, without any urging from
the Univetsity authorities, and spoke
before the committee, strongly sup-
porting our requests for funds. Rep-
resenting as they do. about one-third
of the tax paying power of the state,
their action has ungsual signific-
ance."
President Burton stated that he be-
lieves the budget committee was de-
cidedly favorable toward the Univer-
sity's request. He quoted a remark
by Auditor General Fuller, illustrat-
ing the attitude of those present. Mr.
Fuller said, "Dr. Burton, if you can
present the needs of the University to
WOLEINES GET PLCS
ON MYTHICAL ELEVNS
STEKETEE, GOETZ AND OTHERS
HONORED BY SPORT
WRITERS
I I
With the 1920 Big Ten football sea-
son a matter of history, western crit-
ies are engaged in the annual pas-
time of picking All-star combina-
tions. Walter Eckersall of the Chi-
cago Tribune and Harry Bullion of
the Detroit Free Press have made the
selections given below. The Detroit
writer, in addition to the men named
on the teams, chose Fielding H. Yost
to coach his mythical aggregation.
Eckersall's Team
1st Team Pos. 2d Team
Carney, Ill. ..R.E.......Belding, Ia.
Slater, Ia. ....R.T.....Goetz, Mich.
(capt.)
Tierney, Minn. .R.G.....Hartong, Chi.
Depler, Ill.......C......Bunge, Wis.
Penfield, N. W. .L.G.....Taylor, 0. S.
McGuire, Chi. ..L.T.....Huffman, 0. S.
Weston, Wis. .L.E......Cappon, Mich.
(capt.)
A. Denine, a. . Q.....Fletcher, Ill.
Steketee, Mich. .R.H. Elliott. Wis.
Stinchcomb, 0. S. L.H...Willams,Ind
Crangle, Iyy. ...B...Willaman, O.S.
Bullion's Team
1st Team Pos. 2d Team
Weston, Wis. ..L.E......Myers, 0. S.
Goetz, Mich. ..L.T.... Huffman, O. S.
Taylor, O. S...L.G......DunneMich.
Depler, Ill.......C.......Vick, Mich.
Tierney, Minn. . R.G.....Nolan. Minn.
Slater, Ia. .....R.T...Birk, Purdue..
Carney, Ill. ...R.E.....Hellstrom, Ill.
A. Devine, Ia. ..Q.B...Workman, O. S.
Stinchcomb, O. S. L.H...Walquist, Ill.
Steketee, Mich. R.H.... Usher, Mich.
Crangle, Ill. ...F.B...Willaman, 0. S.

the legislature as forcibly as you have
to us, I'll bet my hat you get every
dollar you are asking for."
The budget committee will not act
on the University budget until about
Jan. 1, President Burton said, as the
rest of the budgets of all the boards
and institutions of the state must be
presented before any action. About
87 hearings will take place before
there acn be any action.
FRATERNITIES NOTICE
Fraternities and sororities are
requested to send a representa-
tive to a meeting to be held at
5 o'clock Monday in the Assem-
bly room at Lane hall.

EX- SENATOR BEVERIOGE
WILL TALK WEDNESDAY
SPEAKER ROSE FROM PLOWBOY
TO FILL PLACE IN U. S.
SENATE
Albert J. Beveridge, ex-senator fromt
Indiana, will fill the next number of
the Oratorical association program
when he speaks on "The Develop-t
ment of the Constitution Under Chief
Justice Marshall" next Wednesday at1
Hill auditorium.
Ex-Senator Beveridge has had an1
interesting career. Born on a farmr
in Ohio in 1862, his family moved to9
Illinois just after the Civil war. From
the age of 12 years he led a life of'
hardships, working as plowboy, rail-
road laborer, logger, and teamster,'
until he entered high school. At 221
he received the degree of Ph.B. from'
De Pauw university and three years
later that of A.M. He then entered
the law office of Senator McDonald
and was admitted to the bar in 1887.
He was associated with McDonald
and Butler until he went into prac-
tice for himself, and has been Iden-
tified with many important cases.
Twice Elected Senator
In 1899 he was elected United
States senator and in 1905 was re-
elected. In 1902 he received the de-
gree of LL.D. from De Pauw univer-
sity. He was chairman of the Pro-
gressive National convention in 1912.
and has long been known as a Re-
publican campaign orator. While a
student in college he once won the
Northern Oratorical championship,
and while in the senate was known
as a man of strong speaking ability.
The ex-senator is a student of po-
litical science, law, and government,
and has written many books on va-
rious subjects. His lecture will by
based upon his latest work, "The Life
of John Marshall." Prof. Claude H.
Van Tyne of the History department
describes this book as the "best his-
torical biography of the generation."
Asks Students to Attend
Mr. Beveridge himself has requested
that students of political science and
government attend his lecture. For
some time he has been compelled to
refuse invitations to speak, and only
lately rejected the opportunity to
address the Detroit Bar association.
It is expected tha4 this organization
will attend the lecture in a body.

Northwestern Unable to Withstand
Strong Offensive of Capitol
City Backs
CAPTAIN VREELAND AND DAY
DOMINATE DETROIT OFFENSE
Displaying a vigorous attack which=
baffled their opponents, Lansing High
defeated Northwestern of Detroit, 19
to 7, yesterday on Ferry field in a
game for the semi-championship of
Michigan, which was featured by
strong offensive play, weak defensive
work, and clean but nevertheless hard
playing.
In the first few minutes of play the
Capitol city aggregation rushed the
ball down the field and across the
goal line for what would have been a
touchdown if the Lansing back had
not fumbled, Sweeney of Northwest-
ern, recovering for a touchback. From
this time, except for one brilliant at-
tack of the Detroiters in the second
quarter which brought them a score
and for a few other sporadic attempts
later in the contest, Lansing was
clearly the superiorof Northwestern.
Both Weak on Defensive
In offensive play the Capitol city
team was decisively better, taking the
ball for first downs consistently. In
defensive work, although neither team
was strong, Lansing had the edge on
the Detroiters.
Fitzpatrick, quarter; Meller, full-
back; and Richards, halfback, were
the stars for Lansing. Consistent
gains were made through the line by
all of these men, and on many occas-
ions they squirm and twist their way
around tacklers for from 15 to 45
yards. In particular, Fitzpatrick was
good. His change of pace took him
off tackle and around ends many
times. Meller was the equal of the
quarter. An off tackle drive for 45
yards when he tossed off five North-
western tacklers was his most bril-
liant contribution. Richards made a
neat run of 20 yards for the second
Lansing touchdown.
Vreeland Stars
Captain Vreeland, who entered the
game for Northwestern late in the
first quarter, plunged his way to be-
ing the star for the Detroiters. Car-
rying everything before him, this back
would puncture the Lansing line for
big gains at almost every buck. An
18 yard gain and then a two yard
plunge by Vreeland gave Northwest-
ern its sole touchdown. He was also
good on end runs. Day, a halfback
also played a fine game for North-
western.
Only three forward passes, all by
Northwestern, were completed in the
course of the game, and a Lansing
pass to Kipke was allowed on the
charge of interference by a North-
western back. In her attempts North-
western made one good for five yards
,nother gained two yards, and twr
yards was lost on the third effort.
Approximately 25 yards was netted to
Lansing when Northwestern interfer-
red with Kipke.
Taking the ball on her 40-yard line
in the second quarter, Lansing made
its first down in mid-field. After a five
yard penalty for offside, Meller took
the ball off left tackle, and was not
stopped until he reached the 20-yard
line. Again Meller went, this time
depositing the ball on the four-yard
line. Richards finally carried it over,
but Meller failed to kick goal.
Vreeland returned the Lansing
kickoff to his 40 yard line, and then
made 13 for a first down. Several
plunges again brought a first down
and then Day brought another with
the ball on the 25-yard line. Vreeland
carried the ball to the two-yard line
on an end run, from where on the
next play he bucked over. Day kick-
ed goal.

Not to be daunted, Lansing came
right back when Meller made 12
yards, followed by a 33 yard gain by
(Continued on Page Six)

NUMEROUS CLASS
OUTLINED
YEAR

ACTIVITIES
FOR

SECRETARY POST
SPEAKS TONIGHT
Louis Freeland Post, assistant sec-
retary of labor of the United States,
will deliver a lecture on "The Future
of Labor" at 8 o'clock tonight in the
Natural Science auditorium. Mr. Post
will be the guest of several faculty
members at a dinner 4t the Union.
"When as noted an authority as Mr.
Post speaks on labor problems, no one
should let anything interfere with his
attendance," declared L. J. Carr, '21,
chairman of the Michigan Students'
Liberal club.
SENIOR LIT COMMITTEE
APPOINTEES ANNOUNCED

Plans outlined for senior literary
class activities by Fred J. Petty, pres-
ident, call for a busy time for mem-t
bers before the Christmas holidays.
Petty made the various committee ap-
pointments Saturday, and set the next
class meeting date as 3 o'clock Tues-
day, Nov. 30, in - the Natural Science
auditorium.
A complete attendance of all mem-
bers of the class is absolutely essen-
tial at this meeting, as several-matters
of paramount importance will be
dealt with at this time. A discussion
will be held on the smoker, planned'
for 7:30 o'clock Tuesday, Dec. 14, in
the Union, and the senior dance, which
will be held Friday, Dec. 10, at the
Union.
Class Dues to Be Deeided
The amount of the senior class dues
will be decided, and as many as pos-
sible should plan to pay the class
treasurer, J. E. McManis, at the close
of the meeting.
The Senior dance will be held as a
get-together for all members of the
senior class. The senior engineers
will unite with the lits, and tickets
will not be s6ld out of these two
classes. The object of limiting the
ticket sale to seniors only, is to get
the members of this class more thor-
oughly acquainted with one another.
Following the class meeting Tues-
day there will be a meeting of all com-
mittee chairmen, with the crIass offi-
cers.
Personnel of Committees
Class Day-Albert C. Jacobs, chair-
man, Lawrence C. Butler, William H.
(Continued on Page Six)
Five Junior Lit
CommitteesNamed
Class committees for the junior lits
were announced last night by O. W.
Rush, class president. Chairmen of
the committees are: H. W. Hitch-
cock, social; Renaud Sherwood, fin-
ance; L. K. Lepard, auditing; L. A.
Dyll, publicity, and P. H. Scott, Mich-
iganensian.

ATHLYETI C BOARD
FOR NEW STANDS
COMPLETE STADIUM WOULD COST
IN NEIGHBORHOOD OF
$400,000
FIVE-YEAR $50 TICKETS
MAY FINANCE PROJECT
Three Methods of Enlarging Seating
Capacity of Ferry Field
Entertained
Lack of seats at Ferry field for the
most important of this fall's football
games and the resultant dissatisfac-
tion has called forth many plans for
the building of new stands at the
field and the finishing of the stdium,
of which the south stand is at pres-
ent the only section.
It was the intention when the south
stand was built to eventually dupli-
cate it on the north side of .the field
where the wooden stand is now and
connect the two by a stand in the
form of a U at the west side of the
gridiron. The result would be a mam-
moth stadium with a seating capac-
ity of 44,000 people which could be
increased to 50,000 by the addition of
boxes and chairs.
The problem of financing these
plans is the only stone in the path.
The Board in Control of Athletics is
entertaining suggestions from alumni
and all others interested in overcom-
ing the present situation.
Three Plans Considered
The three most plausible methods
for increasing the seating capacity
are as follows:
(1) To build the counterpart of the
south stand where the north stand is
now. This would cost about $150,000
and would increase the number of
seats at the field about 4,000. The
present wooden stand could be mov-
ed over to the baseball field.
(2) To build the connecting linki
in the form of a U at the west end of
the field. It would cost $250,000 and
would increase the seating capacity
by 18,000.
(3) The third plan is to build bott
stands, the one on the north and thf
one on the west, making a comple'
stadium with a seating capacity 01
44,000 people, which could easily be
increased to 50,000 in case of need
Four hundred thousand dollars is nec-
essary to build both of these stands
Outside Money Needed
The Board in Control of Athletics
is now discussing the feasibility 0:
selling seats for the next five year,
for the two reserved seat games o
each year. Under the present tenta
tive plans, the alumni, faculty, an
students would have the opportunity
of purchasing for five years ;tin ad
vance, the best seats in one of th
stands. According to the present prio
it would cost $5 each year or $25 fo
the five years. The purchaser would
in addition, pay the same price agali
for the privilege of always having on
of the best seats for the importau
gaies of each year. The total woul
be $50, in return for which the buye
would have the satisfaction of know
ing where his seat is to be at ea)
of the games where reserved seat

Dartmouth Trims Wash. by Passes
Seattle, Nov. 27. - Dartmouth
smothered the University of- Wash-
ington today by brilliant forward
passes and won 28 to 7. Three of the
Dartmouth's touchdowns were made
directly through forward passes from
Robertson to Jordan. The fourth was
made on a line buck following a suc-
cessful overhead attack. Washing-
ton's lone tally came in the first quar-
ter when Abel blocked a punt and
carried it over.

Italian Chamber Approves Treaty
Rome, Nov. 27.--The Chamber of
Deputies today approved the treaty
of Rapallo which disposes of the Ad-
riatic problem between Italy and
Jugo-Slavia. The treaty was approv-
ed by a vote of 21 to 12. Forty-two
deputies abstained from voting.

Alpha Nu Debates on European Debt
"Resolved-That the debt owed by
the European nations to the United
States be cancelled by the latter,"
was the question for the Alpha Nu
debate held Friday evening. The neg-
ative team, composed of G. N. Welsh,
'22, Fields, '21, Spader, '24, and Lott,
'21, was awarded a unanimous deci-
sion over the affirmative supporters,
Lamberson, '24, R. B. Kellogg, '23, D.
A. Watts, '21, and E. H. Walker, '22.

Other committee members are So-
cial, C. T. Hofer, R. J. Cooper, N. R.
Buchan, A. W. Speer, B. W. Hunger-
ford, Margaret R. Stone, Sara M. Wal-
ler, Dorothy J. Spaulding, Mary
Blough.
Finance: S. T. Beach, R. B. Rit-
ter, K. H. Buttars, B. E. S'mith, Helen
W. Wilsey, E. Holt, Marjorie Deam. .
Auditing: H. L. Chapman, J. B.
Witker, J. M. Crosby, Leah M. Witter,
Euphemia B. Carnahan, Elsie W.
Townsend, Marie E. Stuefer.
Publicity: M. S. Williams, J. A.
Bernstein, R. F. Weineke, M. A. New-
ton, Edna A. Groff, Marjorie D. Petti-
bone, Ruth M. Mills, Devera Stein-
berg.
Michiganensian: G. N. Welch, C. R.
Kitson, P. L. Decker, Zella P. Carr, J.
McCurdy, Bernice Frazer, Dorothy E.
Kehl.

2
,
,
.
-
i.
F.
.

are sold.
4,000 Seats Offered
The seats that would be dispose
of in such a manner would be b
tween the 30-yard lines in one of tb
stands. There would be 4,000 plac
offered for lease.
In the wvent of the adoption
such a plan and successful selling
the seats, about $200,000 would
raised, enough money, according
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman
the Board on Control of Athletics,
start work for the completing of t
entire stadium. The other $200,(
could be easily borrowed.

Probably

THE WEATHER.
Snow or Rain; No Change
in Temperature

U.S. Secretary of Labor Louis F. Post
Tonight - "The Future of Labor" - NATURALSCIENCE BLDG.
8 p. m. AUSPICES MICHIGAN STUDENTS LIBERAL CLUB Admission 25c

The man who defied the Senate.
The man who treated Reds "White."

HEAR
HIM

The man who knows Labor.

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