100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 24, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ITHE WEATHER
1PUA ATMYV ENt TV.

r Sir

4:aiIlj

COLDER TODAY

,ASSCIATED
PRES
DAY AND 'NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

I

VOL. XXXI. No. 44 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER, 24, 1920. PRICE FIVE CEN

ENGINEERS MUST
HAE MORE ROOM-
DEAN MELCOOLEY

*7&0,000 A YEAR FOR
TEARS ASKED OF
STATE

TWO

PRESENT STRUCTURES
P'LANNED FOR 1,000
Inadequacy Caused by Rapid Increase
in Number of Students During
Last Decadie
"Unless the appropriation -of $750,-
000 a year for two years requested by
the College of Engineering and Arch-
itecture in the budget recently pre-
sented to the state legislature pass-
es, it will result in the suspension of
practically every optional course in
the colleges," stated Dean M. E.
Cooley yesterday.,
In discussing the need for a new
building the dean said: "The present
buildings were planned to accommo-
date 1,000 students, and there has
been no increase in floor space since
1910. In fact, with the removal of
the old surveying buildings, the floor
space has been actually decreased
This has necessitated the housing of
courses in surveying in the basement
of the Library building.
┬░nerease Is Rapid
"The inkdequacy of the present
bulldilgs has been caused by the rap-
id increase in the number Of stu-
dents. The enrollment in these col-
leges in 1900 was 260. In 1905 it was
1,030. There was a steady increase
of 300 in the five year period from
1905 to 1910 and a similar increase
in the period to 1915. By 1920 the
enrollment had jumped to 2,080, a
climb of nearly 100 per cent from
1910. At the present rate of growth
there will be 3,000 registered in 1923
and 3,50Q by 1930.
"In statistics which have recently
been compiled showing the total floor
space per student in square feet in the
engineering colleges of various un-
versities, Michigan has a low place.
The University of Pennsylvania and
the University of John Hopkins have
the highest rank with 352 and 348
square feet of floor space per stu-
dent. At the University of Iowa
there are 312 and at Illinois 250. Mich
igan stands almost at the bottom of
the ladder with only 137 square feet
of floor space for each student.
Optional Courses Suspended
"At the present time many option-
al courses have been temporarily sus-
pended. Notwithstanding this fact
sections in many required courses are
much larger than desirable. In the
engineering shops the work in ar-
rears practically equals the capacity
of the shops for a whole' year. 'New
men -are iforced to wait until their
second semester before taking shop.
"A larger teaching staff to remedy
this condition is impractical because
of no place for them to teach," stat-
ed the dean.
.(Continued on Page Eight)
fEXPECT U OF. LEGION
M . rCHAR1TER IN FEW DAS
FORMATION OF POST PERMITTED
.£ ON PETITION of STUDENTS
LAST MAY
"The charter for a University of
Michigan post of the American Legion
is expected to arrive within the next
few days," stated H. N. Cole, instruct-
or in analytical chemistry, who has
charge of the organization of a Uni-
versity post, yesterday. As soon as
the charter arrives a meeting will be
calld for all men interested.,
This charter was granted in re-
sponse to a petition sent to head-

quarters last May by a large number
of students then in the University who
were interest~d in the formation of a
University post. At the present time
the only post in town is the Ann Ar-
bor post with which it is felt that Un-
iversity students have no common in-
terest.
It is expected that with the form-
ation of a University post that a large
number of ex-service men on the
campus will affiliate themselves with
the organization.

NOVEMBER ISSUE
OF. GARGOYLE OUT
Maintaining the igh standard set
by the frst number, the Thanksgi-
ing issue of the Gargoyle will be of-
fered for sale on the campus this
morning. Many lively features inter-
spersed with opportune jokes contrib-
ute to the attractiveness of this nu-
ber, chief among which is the "poets'
corner," in which section the poeti-
cal aspirations of various contribut-
ors have been printed with no at-
tempt at restriction.
The art features of the number are
especially noteworthy, and include a
cover by L. R. Boyd, '22, in keeping
with the season, a double page car-
toon by Carl Hubach, '22, and a fron-
tispiece by W. W. Gowe'r, '23, besides
the regular amount of illustrations
and sketches.
A material increase In the circula-
tion of the paper, has been reported by
the business staff. In Nov., 1919, 1,300
copies were printed as against 2,200
printed in October of this year. For
the present issue an order of 2,600
has been placed.
ASIATIC WR SEEN
BYN6 POOHN CEW
Chinese Problems, National and Inter-
national, Sketched in Speech
Last Night
DR. CREW BELIEVES DANGERS
LIE IN VERSAILLE TREATY
"In the Versaille treaty can be found
the seed of a great Asiatic war," de-
clared Ng Poon Chew in a lecture de-
livered last night in Hill auditorium
on the subject of "China, Her Prob-
lems, National and International."
Dr. Chew, who between his more ser-
ious statements of Chineseneeds, re-
countdl humorous anecdotes, sketch-
ed conditions in his native land, and
still more briefly sketchd a few of
the outstanding points of China's his-
tory during recent years.-
Doubts Japan's Intentions
Speaking after the lecture to a rep-
resentative of The Daily, Dr. Chew
emphasized his feeling of the dangers
contained in that part of thb treaty
which terminated the Great War, and
which relate to the province of Shan
tung._
"Ifeel sure that they will result in
an Asiatic war," he insisted, "a war
which will not only affect the nations
of China and Japan but which is lia-
ble to embroil many of the leading na-
tions of the' world, thus causing an-
other World War. While Japan has
declared her intention of returning
ceded territory, I do not feel that
she will ever do this. If this were
her idea she would never have taken
if from the Germans."
In speaking of the difficulty which
many Americans have in under-
standing the Chinese, he mentioned
the fact that China has 45 centuries
of unbroken history on which her
ideas were founded. ,
Missionaries Awake China
"The awakening of China," says Dr.
Chew, "is due directly and indirectly
to our contact with America through
the missionaries who have done ex-
tensive work in my country for the
past 60 years. I believe in mission-
ary work. I have seen it work and
for me seeing is believing."
In summing up the Japanese men-
ace in China the lecturer said: "The
Japanese government is responsible

for 80 per cent of the internal trouble
of China and also for mudh of the
trouble in Russia. Since 1915, when
she made her 21 demands upon China
she has been working to get a foot-
hold on continental Asia."
HONARARY SOCIETY
.ELECTS ELEVEN MEN
Tau Beta Pi, honorary scholastic
engineering society, elected 11 seni-
ors, who will be initiated this fall a a"
date to be announced later.
The men represent the departments
of civil, marine, mechanical, chemical
and electrical engineering. The names
of the neophytes are: R. B. Alexand-
er, M. B. Covell, W. H. Gridley, A. M.
Holmes, E. A. Kerbey, J. M. Miller,
G. H. Roderick, H. S. Sherman, S. W.
Traylor, L. Van Horn and C. B. Wetz-
el, all of the class of '21E, excepting
Holmes, ,who is ex-'20E.

EUOROPEAN CHILD
RELIEF UNITED
IN ONE[ COUNCIL
WILL BE LARGEST BENEVOLENT
ORGANIZATION EVER
ATTEMPTED
HOOVER CHOSEN HEAD;
F. K. LANE, TREASURER
. X

BY THE PRESIDENT:
A Procla'mation

Eight of American Societies for+
ity Work Combined with
h One Chairman

Char. I

(By Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 23.-The European
League council, comprising eight of
the largest league organizations, was
established here today to co-ordinate
child relief in eastern and central
Europe
Herbert Hoover was chosen chair-
man )of the council and Franklin K.
Lane treasurer. ."Its purpose," Mr.
Hoover stated, "would be to provide
funds fo three and one-half million
starving and diseased children and to
administer this relief economically.
"This is the largest co-operative
benevolent organization ever attempt-
ed in the United States," Mr. Hoover
said. "The organizations represented
have come to the unanimous, though
independently formed- conclusion, that
nothing but prompt and united action
by the whole American people can
avert incredible tragedy for the help-
less children abroad. The organiza-
tion forming the council will have
representatives' in every town and
community in the nation for the rais-
ing of necessary funds."
The council includes the American
Relief administration, the American
Red Cross, Knights of Columbus,
Young Men's Christian association,
the Young Women's Christian associa-
tion and the Jewish joint distribution
committee and the Federal council of
the Churches of Christ in America.
DEC. 1,16,11 SET S
MINSTREL SHOW DTES
MANDOLIN CLUB PERSONNEIJ IS
ANNOUNCED BY DIREC-
TOR
Dates for the Glee and Mandolin
club minstrel show were announced
yesterday as Wednesday, Thursday,
and Friday, Dec. 15, 16, and 17. Per-
formances are to be given in the Whit-
ney theater.-
For more than a week the Glee club
has been rehearsing on show num-
bers, and minstrel try outs have been
appearing before E. Mortimer Shuter,
production director. The book for the
minstrel acts is being written and it
is expected that minstrel parts will
be assigned within a few days. An
interlocuter is still neededi, and all
who feel capable of taking the part
are asked to see Mr. Shuter at once.
Plan Saxopohone Sextet
One of the features of the show will
be the saxophone sextet, which Mr.
Shuter is planning to make.a replica
of the well known Brown Brothers
company. He has already made ar-
rangements to secure the music used
by the Brown brothers in their orig-
inal act. All saxophone players desir-
ous of appearing in the minstrels
should report at 7:30 o'clock tonight
in room 308 of the Union.
Mandolin Club Announced
Having been passed upon by the
eligibility committee, the personnel of
the Mandolin club was made public
yesterday. The following successful
try uts aretasked to come to the first
rehearsal at 7:15 o'clock tonight in
room 321 of the Union, where Frank
L. Thomas, director, will assign work:
First mandolins-H. A. Hall, '23;
Louis Schindler, '21; S. S. Shoup,
'22E; E. P. Nowlen, '22; Ralph H. Du-
b+s, '22E; G. O. True, '23L; F. M.
Cornwell, '22L.
Second mandolins-L. P. Bull, 22;
W. M. Randall, '21; W. M. Adams, '22;
W. J. Bailey, '23E; R. DeMott Smith,
'21E; R. F. Diekoff, '23E; L. A. Harris,
23E; W. C. Matchett, '21E; N. W.
Bourne, '22M; G. H. Futch, '23M.

Third mandolins-J. E. Boice, '21E;
E. T. Ramsdell, '23; M. E. Gordon,
(Continued on Page' Eight)

The season approaches when it behooves us to turn from the
distractions and preoccupations of our daily life, that we may con-
template the mercies which have been vouchsafed to us, and render
heartfelt and unfeigned thanks unto God for His manifold goodness.
This is an old observance of the American people, deeply im-
bedded in our thought and habit. The burdens and the stresses of
life have their own insistence.
We have abundant cause for thanksgiving. The lesions of the
war are rapidly healing. The great army of free men, which Amer-
ica sent to the defense of liberty, returning to the grateful embrace
of the nation, has resumed the useful pursuits of peace as simply
and as promptly as it rushed to arms in obedience to the country's
call. The equal justice of our laws has received steady vindication
of the support of a law-abiding people against various and sinister
attacks, which have reflected only the baser agitations of war, now
happily passing.
In plenty, security and peace, our virtuous and self-reliant
people face the future, its duties and its opportunities. May we have
vision to discern our duties, the strength, both of hand and resolve,
to discharge them and the soundness of heart to realize that the
truest opportunities are those of service.
In a spirit, then, of devotion and stewardship, we should give
thanks in our hearts and dedicate ourselves to the service of God's
merciful and loving purposes to His children.
Wherefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States
of America, do .hereby designate Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of
November next, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and I call upon
my countrymen to cease from their ordinary tasks and avocations
upon that day, giving it up to the remembrance of God and His
blessings, and their dutiful and grateful acknowledgment.

WOODROW WILSON.

Washington, Nov. 12, 1920.

MONEY REQUESTEDFROMSTTSED TE. F

MEETING POSTPONED
Because the following day is
Thanksgiving, the Student coun-
cil meeting which was to have
been held Wednesday night, will
be postponed until next week.
RED CROSS DRIVE
G14TS $2,600 TOTAL
Twenty additional fraternities were
listed as 100 per cent organizations
in returns announced by the Red
Cross campaign committee at' the
close of the drive yesterday. This
brings the total to approximately
$2,600 with some fraternities still to,
report.
The fraternities which recently sub-
scribed 100 per cent are as follows:
Alpha Beta Phi, Beta Theta Pi. Her-
mitage, Kappa Beta Psi, Kappa Nu,
Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi, Sigma Phi Ep-
silon, Sigma Nu, Sinfonia, Phi Beta
Pi, Alpha Sigma, Phi Delta Chi, Phi
Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi
Kappa Psi, Phi Sigma Delta, Psi
Omega, Psi Upsilon, Theta Delta Chi,
and Zeta Beta Tau.
Much credit is due the committee
in charge for the success of this cam-
paign, for though handicapped by in-
clement weather it has managed to
raise a considerable sum of money,
state the Red Cross officials.
FORFIGN WORK OF
Y.W. C. A. DESCRIBED
"All foreign countries are looking
to the Y. W. C. A. of the United
States to train the educational lead-
ers of the world," stated Miss Har-
riet Taylor, executive secretary of
the foreign department of the Y. W.
C. A. in her address, "Women the
World Over," given yesterday after-
non in Sarah Caswell Angell hail.
The health problem is the one which
is now receiving the greatest atten-
tion from workers in foreign fields.
Dr. Clara Sargent, supported by the
University Y. W. C. A., began and set
the standard for the health program.
Miss Taylor emphasized the success
of Dr. Sargent's work, especially in
the late cholera plague.
"Since leaders are needed so great-
ly in foreign countries, training peo-

New Building Essential
tion of Work, Says
Professor

to Continua.
Zoology

WILL NOTAMEN D_
LEGUE PAT AT
PRESENTSESSIOI
SCANDINAVIAN PROPOSITION 4
CHANGE COVENANT
DEFEATED
SOME WISH TO AWAIT
VIEWS FROM HARDIN4
Committee on General Organzato
Recommends Deferred Action
on Amendments
(By Associated Press)
Geneva, Nov. 23.-There will be n
amendments to the covenant of ti
League of Nations at this assembly
the report of the committee on gei
era organization which has been co
sidering amendments is approved i
full session.
Arthur J. Balfour, chairman of tl
committee, suggested that it was t
early to draw any conclusions as i
the working of the league or to for
an idea as to how the covenant m
be improved. He proposed that t
committee recommend the appolt
ment of a special committee to co
sider proposed amendments and r
port to the next meeting of the a
sembly.
Consideration Insisted Upon
The Scandinavian delegation on t
committee insisted upon consderatic
immediately of amendments they pri
posed, but, they were Outvoted. TI
South American delegates were of ti
opinion that any amendment to ti
covenant should await propositio
that are expected from the Unit
States after Presigenf-elect Har
ing's consultations on the subec
They declared it would be entire:
out of order to revise the covenanti
the absence of one of the most impo
tant nations of the world.
Montenegro Applies
News of the application of Mont
negro for membership in the leag
leaked out today. No informatk
whatever was given on the subje
by the secretary of the league. Th
application necessarily wll come 0
on the floor of the assembly beto
being referred to a committee.
FUNDS SOUGHT TODAY TO
AID EUROPEAN STUDENT
DRIVE CARRIED ON BY AMERICA
RELIEF SOCIETY IS
NATIONAL
In behalf of an appeal issued fro
the suffering and needy students.',
Europe to the students in the colleg
of the United States, Sphinx, uno
literary honor society, will today co
duct a one day campaign for volu
tary contributions to this cause.
James Frey, '22, chairman of ti
drive, stated that there will be t
bles located On the campus at ti
engineering arch, in front of thet
brary, and at the State street end
the diagonal.
"While the campus has been lite
ally driven to death in the last tv
weeks," said Registrar Arthur C
Hall last night, "still the appeal me
its a worthy response from the car
pus. TheYfact that the drive is n
only local but nation wide shou
warrant the University making

creditable showing."
At least 1 cents from each st
dent is sought. It is hoped that tb
campaign, coming as near as it do
to a holiday, will meet a Thanksgi
ing response from the student bod
The drive, which is being carried
in all colleges in this country, is ur

STRUCTURE IS FIRE TRAP
AND UNSUITED FOR NEEDS
The University Museum has re-
quested from the state legislature the'
sum of $450,000 a year for two years
for the construction of a new museum
building adequate for Michigan's col-
lection in zoology and anthropology,
the most comprehensive ever assembl-
ed.
Need Is Vital
The vital need for a new building is
asserted by Dr. A. G. Ruthven of the
zoology department, who said: "I
think it conservative to say that un-
less a new building is obtained prac-
tically all the museum work will have
to stop. The department has already
given up trying to do anything with
exhibits and will soon have to give
up the state school work."
Professor Ruthven is particularly
anxious that the' public realize what
a museum really is. It is generally
thought that a museum is a place for
exhibits, while in reality that is a
small part of the work, educational
and research work being the big fac-
tors. The educational work is done
in part by exhibits, the training of
zoology graduates for investigators,
and the rest by working directly with
the state schools, loaning specimens,
and giving directions for study. The
research work is done by the staff
and graduate students. As a z esult
of this onlya small part of the col-
lections is intended for exhibit.
Building Crowded
At present, states the museum di-
rector, the building is so crowded
that one division of the work is neces-
sarily located in the Natural Science
building, and within the next year if
no relief is given another division will
have to be removed. The building is
absolutely unsuited for a museum,
new exhibits can not be installed, those

now made are inadequate, and most I der the direction of the American

of the students are forced to do their
work in'other buildings. The building
is also a fire trap.
The University collections can not
be valued, but it is estimated that they
are worth two millions of dollars.
Many of the specimens and fossils are
extinct, and are impossible to dup-
licate. "In order to preserve zoolog-
ical specimens constant care is neces-
sary, but the present congestion of
things is so great that this care is im-

lief society, with Herbert Hoover
chairman.
PROF. CROSS TO GIVE ART
LECTURE TO ITALIAN CLI
An illustrated lecture on the "I
preciation of the Art of Raphai
will be given at the next meeting
the Circulo D'Annunzio, the Ital
club, at 8 o'clock Wednesday event
Dec. 1, in room A, Alumni Memoi
hall, by Prof. H. R. Cross, of the I
arts department. This is in honor
the 400th anniversary of the death
the Italian painter, Raphael. I
public is cordially invited.

pie in the powers of leadership be- possible," said Professor Ruthven in
comes the most economic, the most relation to the conditions. *
strategic, and the most compelling The present building was construct-
piece of work the Y. W. C. A. can ed in 1882, and was then intended for
do," concluded Miss Taylor. a building of the literary college.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan