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November 23, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-23

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J

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ASSOCIAT
PRESS

PAY AND NIGHT 1"
SERVICE

43.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1920.

PRICE FIVE

NCE, E GLAN0
T TO SANCTION
-nKING'S RETURNl

University Rifle Club To Hold
Old -Fashioned Turkey Shoot

REACH AGREEMENT
ATTITUDE TO BE
TAKEN

ON

TO
iOF

RECOGNIZE
GOVERMENT

That All Moves of Constantine
Would Be Regarded as Null
and Void

(By Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 22.-"Fance and Great
Britain," the Petit Parisien will say
today, "refuses to recognize Constan-
tine, if he r ascends 7the thronerof
Greece," and adds, "the friends of our
enemies are not our friends.,
France and Great Britain, says the
newspaper, will probably reach al
understanding to issue an identical
declaration regarding Constantine's
return. "The refusal to recognize
Constantine," the newspaper declares,
"would mean that all the acts of the
monarch and the government he will
direct, .will be considered. null and
void by France and Great Britain.
"It would be notably so for the rat-
ication of the treaty of Seres, the
newspaper continues. "It is vain that
the brother-in-law of Willian1 II seeks
to retain the advantage gained by
Venezelos through a loyal allegiance
and faithful co-operation with the
Western powers. The friends of our
enemies are not our friends."
Prophets JNeet'
In Conveontion
STwo 'thousand "prophets" thet in
Ann Arbor yesterday at the largest
gathering the Grotto lodge has ever
had. Grottos from . Detrot,. Lansing
and Jakson were the guests of the
local chapter at the convention. Twen-
ty special cars were chartered to
bring the members of the lodge to
this city.
Dinner was served the visitors at
the Armory, the Masonic Temple and
the Y. M. C. A.- Following this was1
the initiation ceremonial at the Whit-
ney theater, at which officers ofthe
gAnn' Arb'or Grotto presided.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS
HEAR PROF. ROTH
Prof. Filibert Roth, head of the for-
estry department, addressed the ju-
┬░nior engineer assembly yesterday on
"The Economic Importance of For-
estry in the United States." After
Professor Roth' had concluded, a
short class meeting was held.
The resignation oftwo members
frrom the social committee, A. D.
Stauffer and E. H. Fox, who ate work-
ing on the 3-Hop committee, was ac-
cepted. The social committee an-
nounced that it had 'made arrange-
ments for the class to attend in a
body at one performance of the Ma-
jestic theater during the first part of
December. This practice was estab-
lished last year for the first time.
MANY STUDENTS INTERESTED
IN PROPOSED AERO UNIT
On the first day of enrollment more
than 60 students indicated their de-
sire to join the proposed aero unit of
the R. 0. T. C. An act of congress
dated June 4, 1920, provides that such
units be established in the various
collgges of the country, due to the
lack o government officers in this
branch of service, only five of these
vaero units will be formed this year.
A scheme of competition has been
worked out' whereby the colleges of
the country compete with one another
for the aero units. It is witli this ends
in view that enrollments are being
called for by the R.O. T. C. officials
here.
An R. 0. T. C. unit must include at
leasl 100 men before it will be con-
sidered as an applicant and it must
finally be Passed on by government

officers before any awards are made.
Enrollment in this branch of the R.
O. T. C. is open to the campus at large
and in order to be successful, must be
well supported in numbers.

In an effort to stimulate interest
in rifle shooting, the University Rifle
club will hold an old fashioned turkey
shoot at 9 o'clock Thursday morning
on the range which was used during
the regime of the S. A. T. C.
Club Gets Army Rifles
The Rifle club has just received
fromF the 'government a consignment
of regulation army Springfields and
there will be 20 guns available for the
shoot. Ammunition will be provided
free of charge. Contestants may use
the army rifle or any other models
they may happen to own. The cart-
ridges available are all .30 caliber.
The, contestants will indicate the
targets they wish to compete on and
the winner on each target will re-
ceive a turkey. These turkeys will be
paid for by the shooters on a pro rata
scale. If there are 25 men shooting
on the first target and the turkey
which has been indichted as the prize
for that target cost $5, then each con-
testant will pay 20 cents for his shot.
In. this way the cost of the turkeys
will be balanced.
To Use "B" Type Targets
The targets used will be the "B"
type, U. S. Army regulation, and the
distance will be 200 yards. Men who
have ever shot on a national rifle team
will be handicapped. The range is
about one and a 'half miles south of
the city. The Ypsilanti local stops at
Hutzel, which is only a short distance
from the scene of the shoot.
R. S Moore, '22E, executive officer
of the University Rifle club, is hand-
ling the shoot for that organization.

THREATENS STATE
No Cases Yet in Ann Arbor, Although
Epidemic Reported in Vicin-
ity of City
NECESSITY FOR VACCINATION
URGED BY HEALTH SERVICE
"Smallpox threatens to become an
epidemic in Michigan for the first time
in several years," says a statement
just authorized by Dr. R. M. Olin,
state health commissioner. "Michi-
gan has acquired an unvaccinated
population due to people who have
been vaccinated having outgrown
their immunity."
Outside Danger Great
The large number of people who
have come 'in from some states are
not strict about following vaccina-
tion regulations, and there is an un-
usually larg6 number of immigrants
who conye here from countries where
small pox is an epidemic. In 1919
there were 2,070 cases reported to our
department, while 3,719 cases have
come under the observation of the
state health department so far this
year," he declared.
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health of-
ficer, says that the epidemic is partic-
ularly had in Wyandotte, and Saulte
Ste. Marie, while Milan and Jackson
which are nearer to Ann Arbor have
reported a good many cases. He says
that so far this year he has known of
no cases in this city. a
Should Shun Ihfected Towns
Dr. W. E. Forsythe, director of the
University Health service, urges that
all who have not been successfully
vaccinated have it done at once. He
also advises students to keep away
from neighboring small towns which
are known to have the epidemic.
N6, POON CHEW TO TALK
O "B D SH "
ON URD. or,011

GARGOYLE NOTICE
There will be a meeting of
editorial and art staffs and try-
outs at 3 o'clock Tuesday, Nov.
I 23, in the Gargoyle office.

I

BURTON TOTALKTOSOPHS
First Address of President Buriton
Before Second Year Class
President Marion L. Burton will ad-
dress the sophomore lit class at 3
o'clock Wednesday afternoon in Hill
auditorium.
This will be the first time that Pres-
ident Burton has spoken before the
whole class and as his time is greatly
restricted he will only be able to de-
vote a short half-hour. It was his in-
terest in the great possibilities of the
largest class in the University's his-
tory that caused him to accede to a
request to address the class.
"Not only are the 1,400 sophomore
lits expected to be there," according
to V. F. Hillery, class president, "both
men and women, but all sophomores
in the University are urged to attend.
Due to the shortness of the time Dr.
Burton can spare, everyone is urged
to be at the auditorium as promptly
after 3 o'clock as possible."
Following the President's talk there
will be a short business meeting con-
cerned with the collection of dues and
the extensive plans of the advisory
committee for a class event before the
holidays.
DRfIVE TOAID NEEDY
EUROPEAN STUDENTS
PRESIDENT BURTON BACKS CAM.
PAIGN TO BE WAGED BY
SPHINX
Funds for the aid of needy and
starving European university students
will be solicited Wednesday by
Sphinx, junior literary honor society,
under the direction of James Frey,
'21. President Marion L. Burton
heartily endorsed the campaign and
stated that he hoped to see the Univer-
sity over-subscribe its quota.
Michigan Competing with Others
Michigan will be competing with
all other universities and colleges in
the country and so the results of the
d1rive will give her standing with the
other schools of the country, accord-
ingly as she responds to this 'cam-
paign. The drive throughout the coun-
try is being backed by Herbert C.
Hoover, John J. Pershing, and many
other men of national standing. Re-
ports from the headquarters of the
campaign state that the question of
giving to the fund is a question of life,
and death of thousands of Europeans.
A Thanksgiving Offering
Frey states that the students should
take this drive in the idea of a
Thanksgiving offering and hopes they1
respond to it with that idea in mind.
There will be three tables placed oni
the campus, each in charge of threeI
men. One will be in the engineering1
arch, a second in front of the Library,s
and the third by the Law building.
NEW CITY CHARTER'
UNDER FORMATION
Public Discussion Invited After Its
Completion, January 1

a

UNION LOSS LAST YEAR $3,000 ON
BUSINESS AMOUNTING TO $400,OCCURISTOfE

OFFICIALS DECLARE
NECESSARY TO

ENDOWMENT
PROVIDE FOR

FUNDS
EMERGET

FOOD DEPARTMENT
LOST THE

Enlargement of Cafeteria Would Bring in Volume of Business
Offset the Cost of Maintaining Restaurant,
It Is Stated

SOURCE OF LARGEST REVENUE ALT]
MOST MONEY DEFICIT DUE TO HIGH
LABOR AND FOOD COSTS

That the Union lost a little over $3,000 last year on a busini
nearly $400,000 was made public yesterday by a financial statement re
to the board of governors of the Union by Prof. Evans Holbrook, fii
secretary. The statement further shows that every dollar which w
wards the total of business was put back into the business and u
student adtivities. Nothing was laid aside for a building sinking ft
cept a small allowance for wear and tear on departmental equipme
Deficit Shows Remedy Necessary
Officials point out that the deficit forcibly brings to attention t]
that an endowment fund is necessary to provide for emergencies wh
ances may be on the loss side of the ledger. This condition is brought
they say, because the business is run as close to cost as possible, v
any attempt being made to create profits.
The enlargement of the cafeteria, which showed a credit balance
bring in a volume of business which would nearly offset the loss it
food departments, it is said. The restaurant business showed a great
than any other department.
Total receipts for the fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 1920, were $386
and the total disbursements, $389,344.19, which left a net loss on the
operations of $3,076.62.
General administrative expenses, including superinte dence, ofl
pense, social activities, mechanical plant, and the operatinxg account,
includes house supplies, house wages, taxes, insurance, etc., amour
$49,567.16.
Over against this there was a credit balance of $6,356.58 derive
the main operating departments, food (including restaurant and ca
operated at a loss of $7,859.11), soda bar, stand, billiards, lodgings, b
alley (operated at a loss of $80.76), and barber shop. This balan
further augmented by a bale
$13,300.01 from minor depar
LII O H including among others, the
musical activities, spotlight,
STEINE trip, dances and rentals. Th
credit balance therefore was
656.59-against $49,567.16, gene
GRINNELL COLLEGE FACULTY ministrative expense, which sh
MAN TO GIVE THANKS- loss kof $29,910.57 on the year'
GIVING ADDRESS ness. This, however, was partia
set by the receipt of $26,833.9
dues, both student and annu
Edward Alfred Steiner, professor of still a $3,076.62 deficit remaine
sociology in Grinnell college, Iowa, Depreciation Not Figure
will speak before the student body Inari atisossua
and tons cie ,w1 T 1holyan , iimn , yyn
in arriving at this loss, a

WARWOE AR[ESSES
HARRIET TAYLOR HEAD OF ALLl
tY. W. C. A.ACTIVITIES IN
EUROPE
"Women the World Over," will bej
the subject of Miss Harriet Taylor's
address to Ann Arbor and University
women at 3 o'clock this afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Miss Tay-
lor is the executive secretary of the
foreign department of the national Y.
W. C. A. and was prominent in war
work as head of all Y. W. C. A. activ-
ities in Europe.
"I hope that every University wom-
an will avail herself of, the oppor-
tunity of hearing Miss .Taylor," said
Mrs. Marion L. Burton in speaking
to the advisoryo board and the cab-
inet of the University Y. W. C. A.
Sunday afternoon. "She is one of the
finest women' and one of the finest
speakers I have ever heard."
Mrs. Burton will give a tea this
afternoon for the advisory board with
Miss Taylor as guest of honor. Miss
Taylor addressed the directors of the
city Y. W. C. A. and the advisory
board of the University Y. W. C. A.. at
a supper given in her honor at New-
berry hall last night, having as her
subject "World Fellowship." "She will
be in personal conference with stu-
dents interested in Y. W. C. A. secre-
tarial work this morning at Newberry
hall.
$1, 600 RAISED IN.
RED CROSS DRIVE
- *
Credit Due Veterans of Foreign 'Wars
tOrganization for Aid
Sixteen hundred dollars has been
subscribed so far in the Red Cross
drive, and many more subscriptions
are expected. Delta Kappa Epsilon
and Phi Kappa Psi fraternities have
subscribed 100 per cent.
"Much credit is due the Veterans.
of Foreign Wars organization for their
aid in making the Red Crossdrive a
succOss,'7 said Emerson Swart, '22E,
campus drive chairman. "Today is
the last day of the drive and we hope
to make it the best."
r MEETING POSTPONED
Because the following day is
Thanksgiving, the Student coun-
cil meeting which was to have
C been held Wednesday night, willI
I be postponed until next week.

I

EDITORI
WITH

CREDITED BY PRESS
DELIGHTFUL SENSE
OF HUMOR

Ng jPoon Chr w, designated by the
San Francisco Call as the "Mark
Twain of China," will speak at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium on
the subject, "China and Her Bur-
dens."
Dr. Chew founded and is editor of
the first Chinese daily paper in Amer-
ica. He is prominent among his busi-
ness associates both-in America and
Cina emp vie-nresid t of te

%JIL, ung p enCjrU1UT l1a
Jan.1 will mark the completion of
Chinese Mail and Steamship company. the new city charter now in the proc-
During recent years he has. made sev- ess of making by the charter commis-
eral trips to his native land in order sion, elected by the citizens of Ann
that he might keep in touch with the Arbor last April. Public discussions
affairs that are of vital importance to will be welcome after that time. Ac-
his country. cording to the statute, it Is necessary
Editors of the leading papers for the charter to be drawn up 90
throughout the country have credited days before the date on which it is
Dr. Chew with having a delightful Ito be presented to the voters.
sense of humor, no matter how sari- The charter commission meets
ous the discussion. The Washington every Tuesday night and several pub-
Pathfinder recently said of him: "In lie hearings have already been held.
the lecture field his brilliance, wit, The commission desires the advice
light sarcasm, and excellent command and information of citizens.
of the English language have won The new charter is being drawn up
deep appreciation." because of the vote last April to have
one prepared and submitted to the
EGYPTIAN INDEPENDENCE people next spring. Since the adop-
TOPIC OF ADELPHI DEll ATE tion of the old city charter, much has
developed in municipal government.
"Resolved, That the United States' mch is geet t
and the new catri xetdt
should intervene England and EgyptItake advantage of the new ideas.
in favor of Egyptian independence," tIt isdangopotunityfdras.l
was the question discussed at the It is an opportunity for a simpler
meeting of Adelphi House of Repre- and more efficient form of city gov-
ernment," said Prof. E. C. Goddard, a
sentatives last night. The affirmative member of the charter commission,l
side of the proposition was upheld by yesterday.
Representative D. Roxburgh, the neg- ystrday._
ative by Representative Alexander.
The house went on record as being Union Orchestra to Receive Charms
opposed to the resolution. The next Charms will be given to the men
regular meeting will be held next who played during the past year, at
Tuesday evening at the usual time. the rehearsal of the Union orchestra

auu w oup tuasgtvu g ru
ing at the Union services in Hill aud-
itorium.
Born in Vienna, Austria, in 1866,
Professor Steiner was educated in the
public schools of Vienna, the gymna-
sium or prep schools at Pilsen, Bohe-
mia, ,and following this attended the
University of Heidelberg, where he
obtained his degree in 1885. This was
followed soon after his arrival in
America by a full course at Oberlin.
Graduating from Oberlin in 1891, Pro-.
fessor Steiner was ordained a minis-
ter of the Congregational church at
that time.
Starts as Journalist
Preceding his American college'
work, he went into journalism and
from a cub reporter on a Nlew York
paper, he developed into a feature
writer in a short time. From then
on he worked on newspapers in all
parts of the country and in all stages
of the profession.
In 1903 he left the ministry and
went to Russia for a short time as the
special representative of the Outlook
magazine. In September of that year
he returned and accepted the position
of professor of sociology in the facul-
ty at Grinnell college, where he, has
been since that time. During his period
of service at Grinnell, Professor Stein-
er has done much work along the
line of helping the American people
and the immigrants" to this country
to become better acquainted.
Has Record as Author
The writing of many books on the,
subject of the immigrant and his
problems has been another part of
the professor's work. Of these, prob-
ably "From Alien to Citizen," and
"The Immigrant Tide," are the best,
known.
Freshman Conduct Committee to Meet
Herbert Dunphy, '23, chairman of
the Student council committee on
freshman conduct, will meet the mem-
bers of that committee at 7:30 o'clock
Tuesday, Nov. 23, in the Union.

Which might have made it still
er, was omitted, that of not I
depreciation charges for furniti
building. The furniture rep
an investment of $200,000 ar
building $900,000. However, de
tion was charged ! for depari
equipment.
Byfar the largest source .o
revenue derived last year wa
the food department, but it al
the most money. The restauran
nes totaled $127,552.74, while t
eteria brought in $101,788.06,
for the two departments of $22
or more than half the total gro
enue of% the Union. The rest
business was an expensivep
tion to the Union, showing a
$12,806.55. On the other han
cafeteria showed a credit bala
$4,947.44, which made the net
the food department $7,859.11.
due to extremely high labxor ar
costs, Union officials explain a:
ther emphasize their point thc
is served at cost, or, as last ye
less than cost.
Bringing in a total of $25,133
soda bar had a ' credit balai
$2,855.09, after $2,845 had
turned over to the government
tax. IJodgings, too, were ver
pensating, for $6,684.19 was th
it balance on a total of $1(
The barber shop barely came o
for on a business amounting 1
469.52 there was a credit bald
only $101.92. This is explained
fact that it was late in the yea
the shop opened and many s
were accustomed to going els
Scarcity of pin boys and
quent slow business brought a
the bowling alley department o
on business which totaled $2
Sales of cigars, candy, etc., at
rious stands showed a credit
of $747.42 on a business amour
$17,848.49.
While the credit balances fr
above main operating depa
(Continued on page EigI

i
3
E

l
F
L

Visitors invited.

this evening.

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