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November 21, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-21

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VOL. XXXI. Zo. 42. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1920. PRICE FIVE CEN

MICHIGAN

VICTORS

By

3

POINT

NAME BOLING AND _
THREE OTHERS IN
SH PING SCANDA
WITNESS MAKES ALLEGATION
BEFORE INVESTIGATING.
COMiLITTEE
CHARGE COLLUSION IN
PROCURING CONTRACTS
Chairman of Shipping Board States
Explanation by Bolling Is
Satisfactory
(By Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 20. - Allegation
tending to implicate men now and
formerly connected with the United
States shipping board with alleged
collusion in procuring contracts for a
ship building firm were made by K.
Sands a witness before the Walsh
committee investigating shipping
board affairs.
The men named, alleged to have par-
ticipated in appropriation of more than
$30,000 were R. ?W. Bolling, brother-
in-law of President Wilson, now treas-
.urer of the board; Lester Sisler, form-
er secretary of the board; John Tran-
or, representative of the Downey ship
building company, and Sands, himself.
The witness testified he had received
money in the form of notes, which he
had discounted and described alleged
payments to Bolling and Sisler. The
money, the witness declared he un-
derstood, was a commission to him for
securing a loan to a ship building
company in whose employ he was at
that time.
Chairman Benson, of the shipping
board, tonight issued a statement de-1
dlaring that Bolling's explanation of:
charges made against him by Sands
was "perfectly satisfactory."
CONSTANTINES RETURN
UP' TO POPULAR VOT1E

Ohio

Wins In Last ' Iinute

CHARITY BUDGET
REACHES $27,000
With subscriptions totaling $27,000
already reported, the committee con-
ducting the city budget drive of the
united charitable organizations of Ann
Arbor has expressed hopes of secur-
ing the additional $13,000 necessary
to reach the objective of $40,000 with-
in the next week.
In order to ascertain the sentiment
among University students on the
matter of soliciting campus subscrip-
tions, Rev. J. M. Wells, of the First
Baptist chureh, addressed a meeting
of the interfraternity council at the
Union last Wednesday. A vote taken
by house representatives resulted in
the decision that it was inadvisable
to hold a campus drive in view of
the several other campaigns which are,
at present being waged.
HARVARD9ICTORY
DUE TOKICKING
' yv e D ef n se of :ale Eleven Forces
Crimwon o I port to Toe
AlttfiA
PASSES AND LONGRUNS BRING
CROWD TO FEET MANY TIMES
(By Associated Press)
New Haven, Nov. 20.-Repulsed re-
pe atedly 1-itheir attacks at the Yale
goal lir a today, Harvard resorted to
a kicking offense and with three field,
goals defeated the Elis by a score of
9 to 0-in the annual football contest
in the Yale bowl.
Brilliant Plays Feature
The contest, witnessed by close to
80,000 spectators and the 39th between
the two universities since 1875 was a
remarkable exhibition of the modern
open and aerial game. While loosely
played at times it fairly bristled with
thrilling forward passes and sweep-
ing runs which time and again brought
the thousands of Crimson and Blue ad-
herents to their feet as though the oc-
cupants of the vast bowl were ebing
manipulated by a system of wires
such as are used in puppet shows.
Eli Defense Holds
The defeat of Yale while not unex-
pected took a most unusual turn due
to the ragged but savage defense of
the Eli, who facing a far more finish-
ed football team refused to be awed by
Harvard. Hurling their bodies in ffont
of the Crimson charges or leaping
upon dodging and squirming runners
the Yale players battled so savagely
that although the Cambridge clan sev-
eral times drove the Elis to the shadow
of their own goal post a touchdown
was beyond the physical ability of the
Crimson eleven. In this crisis the
Crimson fell upon the kick for field
goal and three times out of five boot-
ed the ball between the uprights while
Yale, defeated but not disgraced, left
the field with the satisfaction of hv
ing practically checked its greatest
rival in a game that was considered
such a foregone conclusion that Har-
vard hordes were offering odds of 3
to 1 before the game with few takers.
YESTERDAY'S GAMES

.
CO0NFERE1NCE TITLE
GOES TO BUCKEYES
Stinchcomb Stars with Long Runs;
Carney Injured and Taken
from Game
PASS, WORKMAN TO MYERS,
SPELLS DEFEAT FOR ILLINI
(Special to The Daily)
Champaign, Nov. 20. - Ohio State
won the football championship of the
Conference by putting across a touch-
down in the last minute of play
against Illinois this afternoon. Ohio's
claim to the title is an undisputed
one, since she is the only undefeated
team in the Big Ten.
The Indians were served the same
medicine today which they gave the
Buckeyes last year. As the game was
drawing to a close the Ohio eleven,
in desperation, tried several long
passes, one of which was grabbed by.
Meyers, who ran 30 yards for a
touchdown.
Illinois was handicapped by the ab-
sence from the line-up of Captain
.Depler at center. Carney, their star
end, was so badly injured that he had
to be taken from the game at the
beginning of the second half. Ohio, on
the other hand, after two weeks' rest,
was in perfect shape.
The game early developed into a
punting duel between Hellstrom and
Workman, the latter having a slight
advantage. Neither team could gain
consistently through the line. Stinch-
comb was the individual star of the
contest, having several long gains to
his credit. He opened the second half
with a 50-yard run to the Illinois 45-
yard line.
Both teams got the ball to the one-
foot line previous to the score by
Ohio-Ohio in the second quarter and
Illinois in the fourth. The Buckeyes
held their opponents for downs with
the ball within six inches of the goal.
500 ALUMNI FOLLOW
GAME IN DETROIT
Pep, smokes, drinks (cider) and
talks, leading up to the climax of a
Michigan victory over Minnesota on
the gridiron, all succeeded in making
the smoker of the Detroit almni t

FIELD GOAL ONLY TALLY IN BATTLE
WHICH BRINGS FORTH CO URGEOUS
EFFORTS FROM COMBATING TEAN
PERRIN'S BRILLIANT 50-YARD DASH ONE OF FEATURES OF GAME
EVERY MAN ON WOLVERINE TEAM PERFORMS WELL;
STEKETEE MARKED FROM START
MINNESOTA PLAYS BEST FOOTBALL OF SEASON;
YOSTMEN CONTEND WITH AERIAL ATTACI
Captain Goetz and Wieman Prove Main Stays in Line and Block PFlays Whe
Foe Is Twice Within Eight-Yard Line; Breaks
Favor Michigan
(Special to The Daily)
Minneapolis, Nov. 20.-Battling as never before the Michigan elev
this afternoon stemmed the slashing line attacks of the Gophers and wi
stood the aerial efforts of Williams' men so valiantly that the Wolverin
won by the narrow margin of a field goal from Steketee's toe.
The Minnesota team played the best football that it has exhibited t
season. Several times theadvances of the Gophers were stopped by A.
Yostmen in the nick of time, particularly when Michigan held on the 3-yi
line. Oss, who was on the receiving end of several passes, was the star
the day as his line bucking was also excellent. The triple shift of
Gophers worked well in midfield but lacked the punch to put across a tou
down.
Michigan Shows Fight
The Michigan eleven displayed great fight. There was no particu
Wolverine star, every man performing well. Perrin's brilliant 50-yard di
was the outstanding feature and on a hard 6a1d he would have broken aw

STEKETEE, WHOSE TOE BEAT
MINNESOTA.
CHEMISTRY FACILITIES
MUST BE INCREASED
PROVISIONS SHOULD BE MADE
FOR LARGE ENROLLMENT,
SAYS DIRECTOR
Every professional school hir the
University, with the exception of the
Lawdepartment, will be crippled in
its work if the facilities of the .hem-
ical laboratory, both building space
and equipment, are not increased to
overcome the present congested con-
dition of the laboratory and to meet
its future development. This was the
opinon expressed yesterday by Prof.
Edward D. Campbell, director of the
chemistry department, in discussing
the needs of his department.
Growth Inevitable
Since chemistry is a foundation
study required of all students as a
preparation for dentistry, medicine,
pharmacy, and all the branches of en-
gineering, as well as for those intend-
ing to become professional chemists,
sufficient provision must be made to.
take care of the inevitable growth of
the chemistry department, declared
Professor Campbell. Otherwise, the
University as a whole will be affected.'
"Last year we thought we had;

IN DAYS OF YORE

Michigan
1892....... 6
1893........20
1895........20
1896....... 6
1897.,..... 14
1902.........23
1903...... 6
1909........15
1910....... 6
1919....... 7
Total.... 123

Minnesota
16
34
0
4
0
6
6
6
0
34
106

.1

ATTITUDE OF BRITISH
FRENCH IS ANXIOUSLY
AWAITED

AND

(By Associated .Press)
Athens, Nov. 20.-The Greek peo-
ple will vote Nov. 28 on the question
of the return of ex-King Constantine
to the throne.. The cabinet has de-
oided for a plebescite on this question
on that date. Constantine has cabled
to the government that he will await
the result of the plebescite before re-
turning to Greece.
Meanwhile news is being awaited
anxiously as to the attitude of t he
French and British governments and
also as to the reports from Switzer-
land which said the former ruler
would attempt to reach Greece and
present to the Allies the accomplished
fact of his restoration.
There are some reports that Con-
stantine's return would not oe sanc-,
tioned by the British or French gov-
ernments.
French Minister Deberilly when
calling upon Premier Rhallis is re-
ported to have told the premier sharp-
ly that it was a mistake to believe
the Allies would permit the return of
the former king,
Queen Mother Olga has issued a
message to the people announcing that
she was assuming the regency in the
absence of her well beloved son, Con-
stantine.
Efficiency Expert Visits. Hospital
Joseph Lawton, efficiency expert
from Jackson, is visiting the Univer-
sity hospital in order to obtain ideas
for a new hospital administration, to
be installed at the Foote Memorial
hospital at Jackson.

-- (about reached the limit of our ca-
the Elks' temple a pronounced suc-
cess. pacity," said Professor Campbell. "Yet
A direct wire from the football field there are 30 more students taking lab-
at Minneapolis gave every play of the oratory courses now than during the
game in detaf. "Jack" Watkins, '12, corresponding semester of 1919.
announced the returns to the enthusi- Students Crowded
astic assemblage of 500 alumni and "As a result ,the same as last year,
undergraduates. Cheers that made in laboratories with 60 tables intend-
the hall seem like a minature Hill ed for as many students there are
auditorium on the occasion of a pep from 70 to 90 students crowded in for!
meeting were led by A .4. Cuthbert, , the work. This is an injustice to the
'21E, Varsity cheer leader. student, who finds it impossible to

Faculty Concert Postponed
The next number in the Faculty.
Concert series will take place Sunday
afternoon, Dec. 5, at which time a mis-
cellaneous program will be given.
There will be no concert Nov. 21, as
previously announced.

work to advantage under such con-
ditions.
"Again this year we had to get the
classifications committee to give
preference to students for whom
chemistry is prerequisite to their pro-
fessional work. Those who wished to
(Continued on page Six)

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE oF
RED CROSS UNDER WAY
"The Red Cross campaign for new
memberships so far is a success,"
said Robert E. Swart, '22E, campus
drive chairman, -yesterday afternoon.
"Though we have no definite figures
as yet we are certain that the first
day's soliciting has brought good re-
sults. The campus sees that its sup-
port is needed and is responding will-
ingly."
The drive started yesterday noon.
There were desks at the Library, the'
Union, University hall, at both ends
of the diagonal walk, at the Arcade,
and in front of the Press building. '
A special committee solicited fra-
ternities, and eleven have already
subscribed 100 per cent. They are:
Alpha Delta Phi, Kappa Sigma, Chi
Psi, Delta Chi, Delta Upsilon, Lamb-
da Chi Alpha, Phi Chi, Phi Sigma
Kappa, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, and Xi
Phi. Two women's houses, Alpha Xi
Delta and Gill house, have also sub-
scribed 100 per cent.
The ex-service men who took part in
the campaign merit most of the cred-
it for the first day's success. The
women of the University are answer-
ing the appeal with commendable
speed, according to those in charge.
At least half of the money raised
will be spent in Ann Arbor, for aid-
ing ex-service men, in preparation
for emergencies, and in support of the
five Red Cross nurses of the county.
The remainder will be sent to na-
tional headquarters to be used for
national work of the same character.
Secretary Smith Attends Convention
Shirley ,W. Smith, secretary of the
University, left for Champaign, Ill.,
Thursday night to attend a meeting-of
secretaries of state universities, at the
University of Illinois. He is expected
to return today.

for a touchdown. -The Michigan b
flashed around right end, aided
splendid interference, angled aer
the field, then cut back eluding
tacklers but Gruye, who finally cauj
him from behind.
Being a marked man Stekete
runs were usually stopped, but he R
good for consistent gains off tack
His punting brought. Michigan out
danger often and his defensive p
was little short of wonderful. Ushe
plunging netted Michigan many yar
He was also instrumental in break
up the runs and passes of the Goj
ers.
Goetz and Wieman Steady Line
Captain Goetz and Wieman, play
in their last game,.were the mainsti
of the line and blocked the Minnesc
backs consistently. Minnesota exce
ed in offense, gaining more grow
than Michigan both by straight fo
ball and by passes. On the defers
however, the Wolverines always hf
when the danger was imminent. 1
one field goal is a true indication
the closeness of the fight.
The breaks favored Michigan in I
battle. Arnston's fumble on the
yard line paved the way for t
Wolverine victory and the return
the "little brown jug." Minnesota w
twice within the 8-yard line, a V
which Michigan could not equal.0
break and a desperate fighting spi
enabled the Wolverines to trium
and end the season with a percenta
of .500 in the Conference.
FIRST QUARTER
Michigan lost the toss, but receiv
Eckberk kicked off for Minnesota
Steketee, who returns the ball to t
middle of the field. Usher hits cen
for three yards. Steketee followed
skirting left end for 8 yards. Ust
made 1 yard. The ball is on Min:
sota's 38-yard line. Cappon was ho
for no gain. Banks attempted a f
ward pass which went incomple
(Continued on Page Four)
Ex-Football Star Improves Slowly
Phil Raymond, ex-'20, former Mi
igan student and football star, is i
proving slowly, according to a rep
yesterday from the University hos
tal. Raymond, whose illness is
result of attacks of influenza a
pneumonia while in the naval serv
has been confined in the Univers
hospital off and on since last July

Ohio State, 7; Illinois, 0.
Wisconsin, 3; Chicago, 0.
Indiana, 10; Purdue, 7.
Harvard, 9; Yale, 0.
Pennsylvania, 27; Columbia, 7.
Syracuse, 14; Colgate, 0.
Dartmouth, 14; Brown, 6.
Notre Dame, 33; Northwestern,
Springfield, 7; Detroit, 3.
Center, 28; Virginia Poly., 0.
Nebraska, 33; M. A. C., 7.
Iowa, 14; Ames, 10.

0..

BE THERE!
Michigan's team has beaten Chicago and Minnesota, raised the
Maize and Blue in a wonderful comeback to a percentage of .500
in the Conference race, and placed us again among the two or three
foremost teams on the gridiron of the west. During the season we
have had the chance to put our appreciation into pep meetings and
"locomotives" at the games. Now our chance to do this is past,
and there remains only one way for us to show our direct, person-
al gratitude for what the team has done for Michigan..
That way is to be at the Michigan Central station at 6:05
o'clock tonight to cheer the returning victors-not a. few hundred
of us, nor even a fair crowd such as saw them off, but all of us,
prepared to let loose our tribute in those bottled-up yells we
wanted to utter as the scores came in during the victory.
All Michigan has a rendezvous with that 6:05 train tonight-a
rendezvous with the men who fought and won for us.

I

Johns Hopkins, 49; Western Mary-
land, 0.
Stevens, 21; New York, 14.
Amherst, 14; Williams, 7.
Massachusetts Aggies, 21; Tufts, 0.
Albion, 47; Olivet, 0.
Hillsdale, 28 Ypsilanti, 0.

DAILY STAFF NOTICE
Members of The Daily editori-
al and business staffs will meet
Monday noon at Spedding's
studio for the staff picture.

BAND TO
All members
are requested
of Hill auditori
this evening,
Michigan Centr
come the footb
t __________________

WELCOME
of Varsity b
to meet in fi
um at 5:30 o'cl
to march to
ral station to i
all team.

THE WEATHER
Probably Rain or Snow

11

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