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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SA

rVTTLE'S
UNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT"
Room for All Our
Last years customers,
)ne half block South
of "MAJ"

Particularly
for Students

The Great
interchangeable

Witing Machbine
AU Business, All Sciences, All Languages,
may be had on ONE machine.
365 different arrangements of type and lan-
guages, including Greek, Armenian,aChinese-
Phonetic, and all modern European languages;
also, type set for Engineering, Chemistry, As-
tronomy, Mathematics, etc.
Lectures Notes, Theses, may be most beau
tifully and clearly transcribed on the Multi-
plex in condensed type.
Monthly payments. Good rebuilt machines:
Machines rented.'
Detroit Office - 154 Wayne Street
THE HAMMOND TYPEWRITER CO.
545 East 69th Street New York City
J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of Reliability & Satisfaction
113 South Main Street
ANN ARBOR, - - MICHIGAN

CHICAGO TRIO MOTES
INNEWPLANT TODAY
Buidinig on Link; Press Fills Room
One Block Long
Chicago, Nov. 19.-The Chicago Tri-
bune will remove its editorial, mech-
anical and circulation departments to-
morrow to a new plant containing what
is said here to be the largest printing
press in one drive in the world.
The press room is a block long and
on the first floor, provided with day-
light and fresh air.
By this move the Tribune transfers
its editorial, mechanical and circula-
tion departments across the Chicago
river, the new plant being situated on
the recently opened Michigan Boule
vard link. The Tribune Building in
the Loop district will continue to house
the newspaper's business offices. The
present presses will be used for a
time to supplement the work of get-
ting out the Sunday editions. The ro-
togravure work and the color presses
will continue in the building on On-
tario street near the lake.
To Cover Half Block
Eventually the new north side plant
will cover the half block on North
Michigan boulevard, Austin avenue a
St. Clair street. The first unit is a five
story and basement building at the
east half of the lot, fronting 100 feet
on St. Clair and 165 feet on Austin
avenue. The press room extends
through to Michigan avenue.
The press is 300 feet long and con-
tains 25 units. It is made by the
Goss Printing Press company of Chi-
cago. A novelty is the aerial folders
by which it is possible to collect sheets
from any unit to make up any number
of combinations. There is room for a
duplicate of this 300 foot press.
Latest Devices
All paper will be rolled by gravity
into the basement where it will be
fed into the presses on the frbor above
by means of specially designed reels.
The second floor on the upper or
boulevard level will be devoted en-
tirely to the mailing room and circu-
lation department. Papers will be de-
livered from the presses directly to
the mailing room by conveyors.

The third floor will contain miscel-
laneous offices now scattered aDout
the present Tribune building in the
loop, The composing room willoccupy
the whole of the fourth floor and the
editorial department will- be on the
fifth floor with a sixth floor covering
a portion of the main building and
housing editorial department workers.
TEN COLLEGES GET
NEWS FROM A. P.
About 10 colleges and schools of
journalism are now receiving news
copy from the Associated Press, ac-
cording to a statement recently made
by Frederick R. Martin, acting general
manager, to the New York Times.
Ten years ago The Daily Princeto-
nian, of Princeton University, receiv-
ed the Associated Press dispatches,
and for a long time it was a boast of
its editors that their paper was the
only college journal that had been ad-
mitted.to membership in the news as-
sociation. The Princetonian has since
withdrawn its membership and now
prints only college news.
Next to join the Associated Press
was the Cornell Daily Sun, and more
recently The Daily Illini, of the Univer-
sity of Illinois, The Michigan Daily,
The Indiana Daily Student, and The
Dartmouth, of Dartmouth college. The
college papers pay their expenses for
the transmission of dispatches as do
other member newspapers.
The Associated Press also gives to
several other schools of journalism
mimeographed or typed files of its copy
for use in instruction in courses in
copy reading and editing. Among the
institutions receiving these files are
the Universities of Wisconsin, Wash-
ington, Kansas, and Ohio, and the Pul-
itzer School of Journalism in Colum-
bia university.
PULITZER PRIZE NOMINATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED BY FEB. 1
Nominations for the Joseph Pulitzer
prizes for achievement in journalism,
music, art and drama must be sub-
mitted by Feb. 1, 1921. These must
be based on work done during the
current year. The prizes in journalism
are awarded as follows:
1. For the best paper on the im-

provement of the School of Journal-
ism, $1000.
2. For the most interested and mer-
itorious service performed during the
current year by an American news-
paper, $500.
3. For the best history of the serv-
ices offered the public by the Ameri-
can press, $1000.
The following awards will be made
by the committee as prizes in letters:
1. For the American novel published
during the year which shall best pre-
sent the atmosphere of the American
home, $1000.
2. For the best book of the year, $1,-
000.
3. For the most original American
play, $1000.
The trustees of Columbia university1
will base their decisions on the recom-
mendations of a board of judges se-
lected from prominent newspaper-
men.
American Chefs'
IStrange "Dishes
Please Fayolle
Paris, Nov. 18.-General Fayolle
said upon his return recently from a
three weeks stay in the United States,
"I have just discovered America and
America has conquered me. It is a
wonderland."
"It has been a hard fight, those
three weeks in America," the General
went on with the usual humorous
twinkle in his eye. "I come back on
the verge of collapse with grim dys-'
pepsia holding me in its grip. With-
out taking back anything that I have
said about American Expeditionary
Force" cooks being rank amateurs, I
must take off my hat to American
chefs. There were many- banquets,
luncheons, I survived them all."
To the suggestion that most of the
chefs at the leading hotels were
French, General Fayolle replied:
"They may be, but they certainly have
undergone an evolution for they had
strange dishes of their 'own."
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.

STUDIO
RECITAL
TO BE GIVEN BY
ALMA H. NORSWORTHY
Teacher of Expression
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH
AT 8:00 P. M.
PROGRAM
I
(a) "Little Boy Blue"...
. .. -....Eugene Field
(b) "Bugle Song". ...
.........Alfred Tennyson
(c) "In School Days"..
........Greenleaf Whittier
(d) "Lead, Kindly Light"..
........Cardinal Newman
II
"The Going of the White Swan"
........Sir Gilbert Parker
III
"Muleykeh"...Robert Browning
IV
"Mansie Wauch's First and Last'
Play".......D. M. Moir
A. cordial invitation is extended
to all those interested
STUDI0
1113 COLLEGE STREET

I'1

Mrs. Fox was bragging one day
about the large number of her
cubs.
"How many cubs do you bring
into the world at one time ?" she
asked the LIONESS
"Only ONE,"replied the Lioness
-- "but it's a LION 3'
MURADS COST 20 CENTS
FOR A BOX 6F 10
BUT THEY'RE MURADS
MUR A DS would be lower
priced if we left out all or part of
the 100% Turkish tobaccos of the
purest and best varieties grown-
or if we substituted inferior grades
of Turkish tobacco.
But they wouldn't be MURADS
-they'd only be Foxes!
"'Judge for Youself-t!~

We call special attention
to Murad 20s in Tin Boxes

J"-

aEF .s UZ4 faknrs oJtr t jgf(tqi~ lek 'Trkish
and 4zqpIton Cigar'l&.s u in lr d jJ

r EANERS
-AND
kJI,,one 628.,

Good Writers for Every
Student
rS
Eversharp Pencils
Sheaffier Fountain Pens
Sharp Point Pencils
THE EBERBACH & SON CO.
200 - 204 EAST LIBERTY STREET

Ladies Party Gowns a Specialty

Do

You

Know

That

e

Can Save

You

from

On a Suit or Overcoat

$45.00
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$30.00

$50.00

$60.00

SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$33.33

SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$40.00

$75.00
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$50.00

$90.00

SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$60.00

. ..

We will save you money on furnishing goods

VASSAR UNION SUITS

KNAPP FELT HATS

HEAVY WOOL SPORT HOSE
$2.00 Values, now.........$1.79
$1.50 Values, now........ 1.29

MEN'S SILK SHIRTS

GORDON SHEEP LINED COATS

$2.50 Values, now........ .$1.89

$3.00 Values, now........ .

$3.50 Values, now.

. . . . . . .

1

$4.00 Values, now.......
$5.00 Values, now...... .
$7.50 Values, now........
$8.50 Values, now.......

2.29
2.49
2.89
3.79
5.59
6.79

$12.00
$10.00
$ 7.00

Hats, now. .
Hats, now. .,
Hats, now..

.$9.69
.......7.89
.......6.29
,..... 4.39

$ 5.00 Hats, now..
CAPS

$1.35 Values, now........

LADIES' WOOL SPORT HOSE

1.19

OUR ENTIRE STOCK
OF
SILK SHIRTS
Values up to $16.50
JUST TWO PRICES
NOW
$5.29 and $8.79

$30.00
$32.50

Values, now..
Values, now.,.

. .$25.50
.... 27.50
. .. 38.50

All
Leather Coats

$5.00
$4.00
$3.00

Caps,
Caps,
Caps,

now........
now..,......
now........

.$3.98
. 3.29
. 2.49

Green and
$4.00 Values,

$45.00 Values, now,.

IN
Brown Heather
now........$2.89

Reduced

tz

Clothing
Look For The Blue Sign

More

I

TERMS
CASH

ALTERATIONS
EXTRA

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