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November 20, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-20

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THE WEATHER
PARTLY CLOUDY; 8O30-
WHAT WARMER TODAY

r Lilt

:4I atht

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIT WIRE
SERVICE

i

i

VOL XXXI No. 41. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

t ii B -

EFFINGER OUTLINES
BUiLDiING NEEDS" OF
LITERARY COLLEGE
ASK NEW BUILDINGS FOR LIT
COLLEGE AS WELL AS
PHYSICS LAB
PASSAGE BUDGET BILL
WILL EASE CONGESTION

DAILY WILL ISSUE
MINNESOTA EXTRA
With a play by play story of
the Minnesota-M!ahigan game
sent directly to The Michigan
Daily by special wire; and a
quarter by quarter story of the
championship battle to be wag-
ed at Urbana, The' Daily will
issue an extra as soon as the
final flash is received from Min-
neapolis.
Anyone wishing information
on these games should call The
Daily at 960.
MEDICS TO LABOR0
UNDER NEW RULES

All: of
for

the Old Buildings Inadequate
Present Needs; Want Also
Model High School

Plans for a new building to relieve
congestion in thecOollege of 14teratur.
Science, and the Arts, as well as a
model training school for high school
teachers, and a physics laboratory de-
pend upon the successful enactment
of the budget bill recently presented
to the state legislature.
Speaking of the lit school needs,
Dean Effinger said: "At present the
extreme congestion in all buildings
and classes hinders proper class work
and interferes to a great -extent with
a close relation between the student
and professor. Then too, the erection
of a new building for the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts with
up-to-date classrooms and adequate
lecture rooms will allow the removal
of West hall, and take the literary
college classes out of other depart-
ment buildings, such as law, medical,
and engineering."
Building on Museum Site
"Tentative plans concerning these
buildings are that the first section of
a general building for the literary
college would be built on part of the
site of the present museum, which
would be removed and a new one
erected on North University avenue
across from the Chemistry building.
The budget includes the sum of $450,-
000 a year for two years for building
and equipping this first section.
"The literary college is the oldest
part of the University, and now in-
cludes 60 per cent of the total enroll-
ment. In addition to the general
training it provides, its work is fund-
amently for business education, for
professional and technical study, for
the training of school and college
teachers, and for the development of
research.
Work Crippled
"For 25 years there has been no
improvement in its material facilities
for instruction, except in the sciences.
With a doubled enrollment and a
greatly extended curriculum, its work
is now sadly crippled. Its buildings,
with one exception, are more than 50
years old, shabby and unsuitable. Lec-
ture rooms are inadequate for present
needs; recitations are conducted in
crowded, over-used, poorly lighted,
and ill-ventilated rooms, where the
Are risk is ,great; and basements are
often utilised. The latter case is true
In the Economics building where the
University printing press was remov-
ed and the place fitted up as a class-
room. Many over ."ow classes recite
in the Law, Medical, and Engineering
buildings.
"For building and equipping a phys-
iLs laboratory the sum of $40,000 a
year for two years is requested. Prob-
able location of this will be next to
the old Engineering building. The
present physics laboratory was built
84 years ago. It cannot adequately
accowMnodate one-third the number
of students and faculty now using it.
It is both out of date and outgrown.
The elementary work has been curtail-
ed so that it could be crowded into the
space available and in advanced work
there is insuffl"eant room for equip-
ment to keep pace with the growth of
the science.
Increased C.t Defeat Project
"The Legislature of 1919 appropri-
ated $300,000 for building and equip-
ping a model high school for the Uni-
versity. This was based on a cost of
(Continued on Page Eight)

Michigan
Edict

State Board Issues Strict
on Medical School Re-
quirements

ONE

FAILURE MEANS LOSS
OF ENTIRE YEAR'S WORK

Any medical student who is obliged
to repeat the work of the year last
completed shall repeat all subjects
taught in that year, according to in-
structions to medical colleges just is-
sued by the Michigan State Board of
Registration in Medicine.
No conditions of any kind shall be
carried into the senior year. During
the first three years of the medical
school work a student may be pro-
moted from one class to the next
higher class with conditions not to
exceed one major subject, which is
approximately 100 hours, and one
minor, which is approximately 50
hours, and such conditions must be
removed before the student can re-
ceive promotion. Only one supple-
mental examination for removal of
conditions will be permitted and then
only for actual work under satisfac-
tory instruction.
There will be no conditions of any
kind allowed in the preliminary re-
quirements. In every case the stu-
dent's qualifications of preliminary
education shall be verified by the
medical school accepting the applic-
ant.
Attendance requirements are 80 per
cent of every annual course of study
involved. 1+o student will receive cred-
it in examinations unless he obtains
a grade of at least 70 per cent or its
equivalent in other marking systems.
Degree of M.B. or M.D. will not be
granted unless the student has ob-
tained a passing grade in each and all'
subjects of the required curriculum.
The instructions issued by the state
board constitute a much stricter rul-
ing than has hitherto been in vogue
in the Medical school.
DEC. 7TH SET AS
SPOTLIGHT DATE
Spotlight vaudeville, which was
scheduled for Dec. 1, has been post-
poned to Dec. 7, to avoid conflict with
competing productions at the earlier
date.
Work on the acts has been going
on for some days and the Union has
provided the services of E. Mortimer
Shuter to whip the bill into shape.
This is a departure from the custom
of previous years, as in the past there
has been no outside supervision. Pre-
vio'usly the men in the cast have di-
rected and practiced their own acts.
To date there have been 12 stunts
submitted and four of these have been
accepted. *Tryouts are still desired by
Pierce McLouth, '21E, chairman of
the Spotlight committee.
The keynote of the production is to
be "speed and merit." One hour and
a half has been set as the time limit
of the show, and this is expected to in-
sure short, snappy acts of the variety
necessary to a successful vaudeville
production.
Tickets for the show will be 50
cents as previously.

N. RHeUCANWILL
LEAD. 19221HOP
R. Jerome Dunne, Edward T. Ives and
Robert F. Bare to Aid
Chairman
NO DEFINITE DATE SET;
MAY BE HELD IN SPRING
Norman R. Buchan was elected
chairman of the J-Hop committee and
R. Jerome Dunne, Edward T. Ives,
and Robert F. Barie were elected to
serve on the committee at the meeting
of the Junior lit class yesterday aft-
ernoon.
Each member of the class voted for;
four men and the man securing the
highest number of votes was declar-
ed chairman, while the three next
highest were elected to the commit-
tee.
No definite date has been set for the
hop as yet but the class intimated by
ballot that it was in favor of having
it during the spring vacation. The
final arrangements, however, are now
in the hands of the newly elected com-
mitteemen.
VETS iD 'RED CROSS
DRIVE STARTING TODAY
COMMITTEES TO CANVASS THOR-
OUGHLY ALL DEPARTMENTS
OF UNIVERSITY
Final arrangements for the Red
Cross drive which starts today on the
campus were completed last night at
a meeting of the committee at the
Union.
A number of foreign war veterans,
who have volunteered to help put
the drive across, were present. The
drive will be conducted from desks
situated at prominent points about the
campus. There will be desks at the
following places: University hall, the
Union, the Library, and at both ends
of the diagonal walk. Fraternities
will be reached by men specially as-
signed for that purpose.
A committee composed of Hazel
Whitling, '22, chairman; Arline Her-
man, '22, and Mary Blough, '22, are
making a house to house canvass of
the sororities and women's rooming
houses. Carytides, a house club, and
the Freeman, Spaulding, Slater, Mc-
Leod, and Beebee houses have gone
over the top.
According to H. W. Douglass, chair-
man of the Washtenaw county chap-
ter, who addressed the meeting, the
organization provides that half of all
the money taken in will be kept in
Ann Arbor to assist the local chap-
ter in aiding ex-service men of the
city and campus, in preparing for and
administering aid in emergency sit-
uations, and in supporting the five

Frague Scene Of
Anti-German Riot
(By Associated Press)
Prague, Nov. 19.-Three days riot-
ing culminated today in an attempt
by the crowd to storm the Parliament
buildings despite efforts by the police
to hold them in check. Four times de-
putations forced their way to the
doors of the building and demanded
that the premier surrender the Ger-
many deputy Baern, who it has been
reported spoke in a desparaging man-
ner of the Jugo-Slavia legionairres.
The trouble began Tuesday when
some Czechs stormed a German thea-
ter and removed the statute of Joseph
II from the square. German senators
thereupon walked out of Parliament
as a protest.
Alumni Smoker
To Bost Team
At Long Range
When "Gus" Goetz and his 10 ter-
rIfic teammates" start ripping the
Gopher line today about 700 Michigan
undergraduates and alumni will raise
the roof of the Elks' temple in De-
troit at the Michigan smoker.
When "Gus" and the same 10 war-
riors are resting up between each of
these smashes, the above mentioned
gentlemen in Detroit will let Ike
Fisher and the rest of the tuneful
artists from Ann Arbor soothe them
with the latest jazz hits, interspersed
wth a few Michigan songs, sung by
a quartet from the University Glee
club.0
Smokes and refreshments will aid
in quieting the thunderous mob when
all other means fail.1
The riot will continue from 2 until
5 o'clock. The admission will be one]
of Uncle Sam's pieces of green and
grey paper, that may be exchanged for1
a silver dollar, when presented at the;
Treasury building in Washington.,
If the smoker falls through, Harry
Carey, '20, as "chief gazabo," "Rus"
Collins, '16, "Bill" Hinshaw, '20,
"Rus" Barnes, '20, and H. C. L. Jack-
son, '19, will be in for a due amount
of "razzing."
All notoriety the smoker has secur-
ed may be traced to the hands of W.
A. P. John, '11, and Verne Tucker,
who have besprinkled Detroit, Ann
Arbor, and all outlying districts with
cards of propaganda..
WAR ON BUILDING COMBINES
IN NEW YORK SHOWS RESULTS
New York, Nov. 19.-Disintegration
of the contractor-dealer-labor 'com-
bines forming New York's alleged
"building trust" has begun, and prices
of construction materials have drop-
ped since active warfare against these
interest have been opened, it was re-
vealed today by witnesses before the
joint legislative committee conduct-
ing the investigation.
Increased productivity of labor al-

wi

SPECIAL

A miniature gridiron in the
reading room on the second floor.
of the Union will be the center
of attraction this afternoon when
the Michigan-Minnesota game
will be shown play by play just
as it occurs on Northrop field.
Announcement of the progress of
the game will also be made in
the tap room and the billiard
room. .
Reports will begin coming in
shortly after two o'clock over a
special wire direct from the field
to the Union. Cheer leaders and
musicians will be present to lead
the enthusiasm of the followers
of the game.
The Arcade and Majestio thea-
ters will also give returns.

RETURN SERVICE
TODAY

r

'LTE REPORTS SNOWg
SOAL PASSED BY 250
CRAMER'S WINNING TEAM TO RE.
CEITE RECOGNITION AT e,
BANQUET.
Exceeding the estimates made at1
the close of the Union life member-
ship campaign Thursday night, it ap-
pears that the 2,750 figure may beh
reached when reports are all in. De-h
linquent committeemen handed in
additional names yesterday whichh
brought the total to 2,650 last even-Y
ing, 150 over the goal of 2,500. ThereS
are still others to report. "Names area
still coming in slowly, and I expecto
that the total will reach 2,750 whenP
the books are finally closed," saids
Maynard Newton, '22, general chair-e
man of the drive, yesterday.a
To Dine 200t
Departing from their original plann
to give a steak dinner for the win-
ning team, and the high individual
salesmen only, officials yesterday de-
cided to have as guests of the Union
all captains and committeemen, overf
200 in number. The date of the din-r
ner has been set for Wednesday, Dec.
1, when it is declared the men will be
entertained in a manner worthy oft
the effort which was put forth in theg
drive. "Music, a -big dinner and a
snappy program will make this the'
biggest affair of its kind ever given
at the- Union," said Paul Eaton, '21,
president of the Union, yesterday.
Special Tablec
Special recognition will be givent
to the high individual salesman, and
the winning team. The star salesmen
are to have seats at the speakers',
table, while members of team 11,
Seward Cramer, '23, captain, the win-R
ing team, will sit at a special table.
"This year's drive bids fair to be
the high mark for a number of
years," said Eaton yesterday. "Out
of 6,500 men on the campus, there
are 5,500 connected with the Union
for life. Each worker is entitled to
the greatest credit, for it was only the
concentration on the task by every
single man that put the campaign;
over."
Large Crowd at Tap Room Sing
Michigan songs old and new were
harmonized and close harmonized last
night in the Union tap room in the
most suecessful "sing" that has been
held this year. The entertainment
committee intends holding these gath-
erings every Friday and Saturday
evening. Booklets of songs are soon
r to be printed and distributed for use
at the "sings."

MINNESOTA OUT FOR FINAL VIC.
TORY AFTER FIVE
DEFEATS
WIEMAN AND TWO ENDS
DUE TO START CONTEST
Yost Puts Varsity Through Wrkout,
Signal Drill and Chalk
Talk

OLVERINES, I N FIGHTIN6 FETTLE,
FACE GOPHER ELEVEN DETERMINEDOSCM -BC

(By Thorton W. Sargent, Jr.)
Minneapolis, Nov. 19.-Michigan is
set 'for a hard battle tomorrow.
Minnesota, having lostl five Confer-
ence games, is determined to stage a
come-back for the thousands of alum-
ni. Some 25,000 people are expected
to witness the encounter, practically
every seat having been sold.
Coach Yost realizes the hard game
which confronts his . team. Captain
Goetz and his men appreciate the de-
termination of the Gophers, but the
Wolverines have decided that they are
going to bring the "little brown jug"
to its rightful home.
Team in Shape
The entire eleven, with the excep-
tion of a few men who nurse minor
bruises, is in perfect condition. Tad
Wieman is billed to start, and the two
ends are in good condition. Steketee
is said by Trainer Hahn to be in. bet-
ter form than ever before this sea-
eon,
Arriving in Minneapolis this morn-
ing, the Varsity put up at the Curtis
hotel, the men being ordered to bed
for a rest after their long journey.
A light workout of an hour and a
half was the order for the afternoon.
Yost had his quarterbacks catching
Steketee's punts, which were falling
short because of a dead ball, and the
other men were sent down under
passes to get them warmed up. A
snappy signal drill wound up the aft-
ernoon's work. After a chalk talk
and final instructions tonight on how
to stop the great Oss, Yost sent his
men to bed early.
Field Slow
Warming up today, ideal football
weather s predicted. The temperature
was just high enough to thaw the
frozen earth and to make the field
muddy and slow. Unless a cold spell
comes over night, the gridiron will be
in poor shape for a fast game, despite
the frequent rollings to which it is be-
ing subjected.
Enjoying a light week, the Goph-
ers are expected to be in prime con-
dition to give the Wolverines a real
battle. Homecoming.celebrations are
running high. A pep meeting, a Glee
club concert, and numerous other ac-
tivities are keeping the alumni busy,
and in their final effort to gain at
least one Conference victory this
year, the Gophers will give Michigan
the hardest fight of the 1920 season.
The probable lineups are:
Kic Po. Minn.
Cappon.......LE..........Ekberg
Goet..........LT........Teberg
Dunne ........LG...........Nolan
Vick ...........C.........Clement
Wilson .....RG...........Tierney
Wieman .......RT....:......Frazie
Goebel.......RE.... ......Gruye
Banks..........Q.........Arnston
Nelson ......FB.......Gilstad
Steketee.......LH. ..........Os
Usher........RHB.. Bwn
Dean Cooley to Address Engineers
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley will ad-
dress the Senior engineer assembly
at 11 o'clock Tuesday morning in
room 348 engineering building. Elec-
tion of a basketball manager, commit-
tee reports, and discussion, of assess-
ments for the coming year will be.
part of the program.

t
t
r
t
s

Red Cross public health nurses of the
county. The remaining half of the
money will be sent to national head-
quarters.
A. F. OF L. TAKES STAND AGAINST
RADICALISM AND IMmIIGRATION
Washington, Nov. 19.--The execu-
tive council of the American federa-
tion of labor concluded its work with-
out making a formal announcement
on what it had accomplished during
the three weeks discussion.
It was understood, however, that
certain programs were considered
which by common consent will be-
come policies of the organization.
These include what was described as
a stand against radicalism within la-
borkand for sharp restrictions of im-
migration. There was an almost unan-
imous agreement, it was understood,
for labor and industrial engineers.
Legislation to be urged upon con-
gress was discussed but the nature of
these plans were not disclosed.

so has been obtained since the com-
mittee began exposing one scandal
after another, employers testified.
Mingled with these developments
came evidence to show existence of a
country wide control of -production
and price in marble, cement, lime-
stone and other trades. National asso-
ciations were throttling these indus-
tries, it was alleged.
POLICE OFFICIAL GETS BUSY
AND WALKS OFF WITH CAR
Evidently neither caring to walk to
the Michigan Central depot nor to pay
for a taxi, a student recently step-
ped out of his motor car and board-
ed a train for Detroit, leaving his car
standing in the street.
When he returned two days later
and failed to find his car, Te went to
the police office and expressed sur-
prise that it wasn't where he had left
it. After a few minutes the car was
restored to its owner by the chief, who
had kindly taken care of it for him.

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