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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 16, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


LIBRARY EXHIBIT
DEVOTED TO 0 AMA

AT THE THEATERS
TODAY

tie recording secretary on the third Thus far 4,850 men have signed cards,
floor from now on. Recording in the compared with 3,500 at the close of
lobby was discontinued last week. the first semester of last year.

I

English and
and 20th

saas ass' -, "Mumo
'M
mp
1
1R
h Q..

American Plays of 19th
Centuries on Display
in Corridor

aids to good looks, sound
teeth, eager appetite and
digestion are onI 5c a
Paka eSEALED
KEPT
h
The
FlavoreeeaA
LASTSAfter, everyme31a-t

"BLOT ON THE 'SCUTCHEON"
ILLUSTRATES VICTORIAN ERA
In the exhibit which was installed
in the corridor of the Library on Sat-
urday is shown a new phase of the
Library's. resources in the line of dra-
matic literature. The exhibition is
devoted to the drama of England and
America during the nineteenth and
twentieth centuries, thus supplement-
ing the exhibit of the past three weeks
of sixteenth and eighteenth century
plays.
The first case shows dramas by
some of the great literary lights of
the early nineteenth century-Byron,
Shelley, Coleridge, and Landor-
dramas which were intended for
reading rather than acting. There is
shown also, however, a typical com-
edy of the period, Douglas Jerrold's
"Beau Nash," which enjoyed great
popularity on the stage, with the fa-
mous William Farren in the title role.
Victorian Era Illustrated
Several types of plays serve to il-
lustrate the Victorian era, the rarest
of which is the first edition of Brown-
ing's "Bolt on the 'Scutcheon," a small
pamphlet constituting a part of the
series of dramas and dramatic lyrics
known as "Bells and Pomegranates."
In the same section is a little-known
play by Dickens, "The Lamplighter,"
as well as two early dramatizations
of his novels. Tennyson's dramatic
work is shown in the first edition of
"Becket," and of "The Foresters,"
which was printed in America for Au-
gustin Daly before it appeared in
England. There is also a scare pri-
vately-printed play by Sir Henry Ar-
thur Jones, "A Drive in June," with
an explanation in his own writing of
how he happened to change the title
after the play wa in print; and a
companion-piece to this is a prompt-
book from the Garrick theatre, Lon-
don, of Pinero's "The Profligate,"
with notes in the author's hand.
English Plays Displayed
Plays by Shaw, Phillips, Barrie, and
Galsworthy, among others, illustrate
the more modern British dramatists,
and the Irish theatre is represented
by Lady Gregory, Synge, Yeats, and
Dunsany.
In the section devoted to American
drama are reprints of the first two
plays ever performed professionally
in this country-Royall Tyler's "The
Contrast," 1787, and William Dunlap's
"The Father;" 1789. A small pamphlet
not over five inches tall-John How-
ard .Payne's "Clari; or, "The Maid
of Milan," 1823, contains the first
printing of "Home, Sweet Home,"
which was written as a song to be
sung by the heroine in the middle of
the play.
Shows Later Development
Two cases are devoted to illustra-
tions of the Little Theatre movement
in America, and one to dramatic pe-
riodicals,. showing their development
during the last century, from the se-
verely simple "Covent Garden Jour-
nal" of 1810 to the elaborately illus-
trated "Theatre" and "Theatre Arts
Magazine" of a hundred years later.

Screen
Majestic-Louise Glaum in "The
Leopard Woman," and Topics.
Arcade - Charlie Ray in "The
Village Sleuth." Also two
comedies, Al St. John in
"Trouble," and "The Tamer,
the Wilder."
Wuerth-Bebe Daniels in "You
Never Can Tell." Harold
Lloyd in "Get Out and Get Un-
der," and Fox News.
Orpheum-Elaine Hammerstein
in "The Point of View." Geo.
B. Seitz's "Pirate Gold," and
a comedy.
THIS WEEK
Stage
Garrick (Detroit)-Barney Ber-
nard in "His Honor Abe Pot-
ash," that Montague Glass
farce with the original New
York cast.
Schubert (Detroit) -'Walter
Hampden in "Taming of the
Shrew."

Ccurteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
SThe AOn Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,J0C0.00O
Resources .........$,00,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

I

The last two cases illustrate the his-
tory of the stage in the nineteenth ana
twentieth centuries, with portraits of
actors and actresses frpm Macready to
Mantell, and Mrs. Siddons to Maude
Adams.
The exhibit will remain in the cor-
ridor for two weeks.
Union Changes Registration Hours
Registration hours at the Union
will be from 2 to 3 o'clock each after-
noon except Saturday in the office of

Flowers of Quality
213 E. LIBERTY ST. 715 N. UNIV. AVE.
PHONE 294F1.=F2

LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of " MAJ"

FINGERLE'S- CAFETERIA

OPEN 7:00 A. M. To 7:30 P. M.

322 South State Street

DEEP THINKERS SHOULD BE LIGHT EATERS

FOR LUNCH

TRY A DELICIOUS BAKED APPLE FOR A DIME
WITH RICH CREAM, 18e

:: - OR::

A REAL HOME-MADE PIECE OF PIE OR CAKE
BAKED IN ,OUR OWN OVENS
PU'RE FOODS PREPARED BY EXPERTS

C. J. FINGERLE

The Last Home Game

IIna

I

Iu

Has Been Played

I I

But

You Can Play

B

IL LIARDS

11

Mrs. Fox was bragging one day about the large
number of her cubs.
"How many cubs do you bring into the world at
one time?" she asked the LIONESS.
"Only ONE," replied the Lioness-"ku i's a
LION"
MURADS COST 20 CENTS for a SOX
of 10-BUT THEY'RE MURADS!
MURADS would be lower priced if we left out
all or part of the 100% Turkish tobaccos of the pyrest
and best varieties grown-or if we'substituted inferior
grades of Turkish tobacco.
But they wouldn't beMURADS-they'd only be
Foxes

at the

Recreation

Billiard Parlors

Under Wuerth Theatre

We Strive

To Do The Impossible --

Please

Everybody

Judge for yourself-!
MakeswL hel Tktrks
wdlE~ppain eai

STUDENT MANAGEMENT

Special attention is called
to Murad20sin Tin Boxes

mom I 111 I'll

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