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November 14, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-14

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i...

SECTION

c rt r xti

ONE

I

VOL. XXXI. No. 36. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

i

SOPHOMORES INTV
EENTS FROM YEAE
AWARDED UNOC
CANE RUSH MOST ATTRACTIVE OF
CONTESTS, AND CAUSES
HARD FIGHT
SOPHS OUTNUMBERED
BY OPPONENTS, WIN.
No Serious Injuries Reported to Men
in Charge of Fall
Games
Underclass supremacy was fiercely
contested yesterday morning in the
annual Fall games. By winning two
out of the three contests the class of
'23 was accorded the victory.
Attracting most attention, the cane
rush was the event that was most
fiercely fought for. When the sopho-
mores had gathered around their ca-
tain, who was given the cane, the
freshmen were held back with difi-
culty by the officials. The firing of
the gun held by Calvin G. Wetzel,
'21E, chairman of the Student coun-
cil Fall games committee, was the
signal for as blood-thirsty a scrap as
could have been hoped for. Although
the sophomores were outnumbered by
the men of,'24 they were able to-stand
off the attack for the 15 minutes of
play.
The pillow fights on the poles was
the only contest in which the fresh-
men scored. The track aspirants of
the respective classes were given an
opportunity to demonstrate their
abilities in the relay race. Although
some of their-sprinters outdistanced
the sophomores, the men of '24 were
beaten by half a lap.
Although the weather was extreme-
ly cold, there were many spectators
at the games. After the finish of the
cane rush the classes formed for a
snake dance up State street..
Due to the size of the classes it was
difficult for the officials to maintain
order. There were no serious injuries
reported to the committee.
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRH
OPENS CONCERT SEASON
MARIAN STRUBLE, VIOLINIST, IS
SOLOIST FOR OCCA-
SION
(By L. L. N.)
The University Symphony orchestra
will give the first concert of the sea-'
son at 3 o'clock this afternoon in Hill
auditorium. Like all the concerts in
the Faculty Concert series, it is com-
plimentary to the public.
Miss Marian Struble, violinist, who
has invariably created a most favor-
able impression at her many appear-
ances in public, will be the soloist.
She will play Bruch's "G minor Con-
certo."
It is the earnest desire of the man-
agement to begin these concerts on
time. Patrons are therefore request-
ed to assist in this endeavor by being
in their seats at 3 o'clock. Patrons
are also reminded that small chil-
dren cannot be admitted, as their

presence is disturbing to players and
audience alike.
The program follows:
"Mock Morris," Grainger-Langey,
"Concerto," Bruch (Miss Marian Stru-
ble, violin soloist), Overture, "Heb-
rides," Mendelssohn, "Coronation
March," Saint-Saens.

NO OUT OF THRE
ii P. rAi 19

Chimes' Second Issue Equals Mark
Set 3y Quality Of October Number

WOLVERINES INSPIRED OFFENSE PUTS
TWO TOUCHDOWNS OVER MAgROON GOA-L;
GOETZ, B ANKS, USHER FEATURE GAME

! LI II U J ; U Lfdhd L VU(ByL.'M. W.)J "College Men and Politics," by Dou-
"But can you do it again?" glas Clapperton, leads off in the right
Ln~ S iG iA Pr N HThis question, always asked of the key, with its call, "Let's have the old
novice who scores a bull's-eye on his thinking days back again." The late
CHICAGO AND MICHIGAN TEAMS first pull of the trigger, was put presidential campaign with its amaz-
C SAOFNDMICHIMANATEMNTsquarely up to Chimes after its re- ing proof of undergraduate indiffer-
GUESTS OF MAJ MANAGEMENT markable October Issue. Yesterday ence puts a special valuation of time-
the second Chimes of the year went liness on this article. No sooner has
Following their usual custom the straight to the mark. Sold on the the collegiate reader resolved to think
management of the Majestic theater campus and at the Chicago games, than he bumps squarely into the ne-
last night issued passes to the mem- where thousands of homecoming cessity of thinking, for "The Lit," by
bers of the Michigan team, and also alumni were enabled to purchase it, Prof. Robert M. Wenley, is the second
to the Chicago team, although this is the number will be carried to all article. "The Anarchist Ideal" had
the first time that a visiting team has parts of the country, a herald of the little on this paper. It is a nut to
been given the privilege. A row of fact that Michigan now has an opin- I crack indeed, but it is worth cra-%-
boxes on one side of the house was ion and literary magazine able to ing. Professor Wenley's style is as
reserved for the Michigan men and a stand with the best. "elusive" as he admits the Lit to be;
row on the other side for the Chicago The big thing about the November his ways of phrasing impose thought
players. In accordance with a Michi- issue is its gray matter. It is all upon the reader which only too few
gVictor, thVarsi trpaydothedMiTh-very well to say, "This is an opinion readers are willing to expend. But he
Victors," "Varsity," and other Michi- magazine. Bring them in." But who fares fearlessly into the laby-
gan songs, which were preceded by there are opinions and opinions. rinth is rewarded with much real in-
Chicago songs. Chimes has justly selected those in formation for the unwinding.
which impressions and emotions are Stuart Perry's writeup of the news-
backed by some conscious attempt at paper game is an article worthy of a
UNN Cn AIMAliM thinking matters out. Chimes' large wider medium of expression. It has
roll of subscribers deserves more con- some excellent advice for the young
~1A MEMHER sideration than does the purveyor of journalist from a man whose experi-
bare assertions out hunting for a pub- ence and success call for the pros-
lisher. The November issue is nota- pective cub's attention. Other expo-
NINETEEN TEAMS OF TEN MEN ble for its strong appeal to the stu- sitions in the issue are "Cosmopoli-
EACH TO DO ACTIVE dent who doesn't mind doing a little tanism on the Campus," by B. L. Beek-
SOLICITING thinking. (Continued on Page Six)

SOPH PUBLICITY COMMITTEE
RESPONSIBLE FOR POSTERS
"Intending to arouse interest and
to raise enthusiasm for the fall games
among their classmates, the sopho-
more publicity committee published
the handbills which were passed
around the campus Friday." Such is
the explanation offered by Herbert
G. Dunphy, '23, in regard to the pos-
ter which caused so much criticism
among students Friday. The work
was originally attributed to members
of the yearling class and thus arous-
ed much resentment.

VICK AND JOHNS ARE
SHIFTED ON DEFENSE

Varsity Shows Sustained
Power on the
Offense

Atacking

16

~is
PATHWAY OF FAITH"
MORRISON'S MESSAG

UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS
FURNISH MUSIC FOR
EVENING

TOI

With a goal of 2,500 members, the
Union life membership drive opens
Tuesday morning. It will be a three-
day campaign. Tuesday and Wednes-
day will be devoted to calling on pros-
pects whose names the committee has,
and the last day, Thursday, is to be an
open or clean-up day on the campus.
Soliciting will be done by 19 teams.
with a captain at the head of each.
Teams will have 10 members. "I fee'
confident that this year's drive will go
over the top," said Maynard Newton,
'22, yesterday, "because the Union
building is now practically finished,
and - the team captains are all ex-
perienced workers.
1919 Drive Successful
Last year the drive was successful,
2,200 men taking out life memberships,
a total of 200 in excess of the goal set
by the Union. This year it is esti-
mated that 3,600 men will be approach-
ed in an effort to reach the goal of
2,500 new life members.
For students during their last year
of residence at the University, the Un-
ion life membership fee is $50, pay-
-able in one sum or $10 per year for
five years. For Michigan men other
than students in their last year of
residence and the year following their
last year of residence. It is $100, pay-
able $20 per year for five years.
Team No. 19, Douglas Dow, '22E,
has been named the "Flying Squad-
ron," as its members will solicit Mich-
igan men in the surrounding towns of
Dexter, Chelsea and Ypsilanti. After
finishing there the team will work in
Ann Arbor.
Book Sent Out
A little booklet entitled "The Mich-
igan Union "was sent to all prospec-
tive life member students yesterday
its purpose being to fully inform the
(Continued on Page Six)
25, 000 Visitors In
Union Saturday
Yesterday was the biggest day inf
the history of the Union. The demand
for rooms was unprecedented, appli-
cations having been received for over
1,000. Conservative estimates place
the number of people entering the
building at 25,000. At lunch 90 were
served, and about the same number
at dinner.
In the main dining room there were
three settings for lunch, and three al-
so for dinner. The ladies' dining room
had four settings for each meal. Other
departments, the tap room, bowling

OVATION IS Cl YEN t
TO0 MARINE BAND'
Sustained Applause Greets Paying ofa
Michigan Battle
Songs
ENTIRE PROGRAM UNUSUALLY
WELL CHOSEN AND RENDERED

HIRRET 3MIN FOR
TICKETSCALPi-NG
Athletic Association Takes Steps to
Prevent Illegal
Sales
VIOLATORS FINED $25 AND
COSTS BY COURT LAST NIGHT

Hill-auditorium has heard "The Vic- Two University of Chicago stu-

tors" reverberate from all corners of
the big hall but seldom has the play-
ing of Michigan's favorite march
brought fought such a great ovation
as it did last night when the United
States Marine band under the baton
of Capt. William H. Santelmann, of-
fered it as their first encore. The play-
:ng of the march struck a popular not
with the capacity audience who burst
into long applause with the opening
strains. The ovation following
brought a repetition of the piece.
The rendition of "The Yellow and
Blue" as the encore to the second
numberabrought the entire audience
to Its feet.
The blatant din that is so character-
istic of the appearance indoors of the
usual band was entirely absent in last
night's concert. Instead, the skillful
blending of individual instruments into
one harmonious whole held the audi-
ence until the end of the unusually
well balance program.
The technique of a remarkable di-
rector coupled with the masterly Iepd-
ing of a true musician who meets with
utmost response from his band made
itself apparent through the excellent
rendition of pleasing numbers.
Wagner's overture, "Tannhauser,"
nnened the program. Liszt's nocturne.
"Dream of Love," was plaintively
nretty, being delightfuly rendered.
Musician Arthur S. Whitcomb dis-
nlayed remarkable technique in his
excellent handling of difficult tongu-
ing and fingering parts in his cornet
solo, "Arbucklinian," by Hartman.
In Leoncavallo's prologue "Pagli-
acci" displayed the subtle shading
tones of the wood wind section. The
Peculiarly pleasant tone of the bas-
Roon was in evidence throughout the
piece.
The "Southern Rhapsody," by Hos-
mer, and Lis7t's "Second Polonaise"
completed the program. Captain San-
telman was 'generous in his respons-

dents and one former Michigan stu-
dent were arrested Saturday after-
noon for ticket scalping by detectives
employed -by the Athletic association.
The men were arraigned in a special
court held last night and fined $25 and
costs.
The former Michigan man was tak-
en into custody in Huston's billiard
nnrlor after he had sold a ticket to the
Ghicago game to the operative for
t5. The other two men, both wear-
,ng Chicago bands, were offering two
tickets for sale for $20 each in front
if the Ferry field gate. The detec-
tive promptly purchased them and
turned the men over to the local po-
lice. When searched at the station
the marked bills which the officer had
elven to them were. found on their
person.
Sufficient evidence was collected
during the two days preceding the
dame to warrant the arrest of several
other men for illegal dealing in tick-
-ts and officers of the Athletic asso-
ciation intend to prefer charges this
week.
YESTERDAY'S GAMES

Charles Clayton Morrison, editor of
the Christian Century, speaks at 7
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium on
"The Pathway to Faith," at the secondf
of this year's University services.
As editor of the greatest religious
magazine in the country and as a speak-
er of fame Dr. Morrison will bring af
powerful message to students tonight
according to those in charge of the
meeting. His experience in religious
work of all kinds in this country and
abroad during the war, gives the
spe'ker a background of experience
and first hand knowledge from whichz
to talk.
The other speaker on the programt
Allyn K. Foster, is to give the open-'
ing prayer, read the scripture, and
speak a few words of greeting. Mr
Foster is prominent in Baptist nation-
al work and brings a record of suc-
cessful service in this country and
during the war, brilliant work among
the American armies in France.
Music will be provided by the men's
and women's Glee clubs coordinated
under the direction of William Wheel-
er, head of the vocal department of
the School of Music, and a vocal duet
given by Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler. The
chorus will render an anthem and help
in leading the two hymns.
The complete program for the serv-
ice is as follows:
Organ prelude, "Prelude in D maj-
or," Bach; hymn, "Lyons"; prayer;
anthem, "Unfold ye Portals Everlast-
ing," from "The Redemption," Gounod;
Scripture lesson; Words of greeting;I
Duet, "Night Hymn at Sea," Goring-
Thomas; address, "The Pathway of
Faith"; hymn, "Mercy"; Benediction;
Organ postlude, "Alla Marcia," Bossi.
RED CROSS CAMPAIGN
TO START NEXT WEEK
A huge campaign for new member-
ships will be launced next week by
the Red Cross. The opening of the
drive was originally schedaled for
Armistice day, but on account of the
activities of the charity organiza-
tions at that time, it was postponed.

Outclassing the Chicago eleven of-
fensvely and defensively, the, Mich i
gan eleven yesterday staged a won-
derful come-back before a crowd of
25,000 ardent Wolverine students,
alumni, and supporters who had gath-
ered in Ann Arbor from all parts of
the country.
The cold, threatening weather un-
doubtedly kept the' crowd down to
this number, for there were only -
about 1,000 spectators who stood at
the ends of the field. Between the
halves after Michigan's victory seem-
ed certain, the human block M of
Maize and Blue was shown to great
advantage, and at exciting moments
in the game the frantic waving of the
flags brought the M into evidence.
Homecoming Day
Homecoming day brought thousands
of Michigan alumni back to hear the
'and once more play "The Victors"
-onscientiously, and for the first time
,ince the Northwestern game last year
Michigan won a Conference game.
"The Grand Old Man," who is now
,pending his 20th year as a Michigan
mentor, had rejuvenated his men and
shifted his attack and defense so that
the Maroon line gave way before the
'lerce onslaughts and the defense was
strong at practically all times. An
attack, which featured a limited use
,f the forward pass and open game
gave Michigan a victory over Chicago.
ShIfts Made by Yost
Recent shifts by Yost placed Vick at
defensive tackle with Johns at rov-
ing center, and on many plays Cap-
non was brought into the backfield
for plunging, Steketee going to end.
With this change in attack, Yost solv-
ed the problem of the strong Chicago
line, and gave Michigan two hard hit-
ting backs in Cappon and Usher.
Directing the Michigan eleven
ably, Banks in his first real test at
quarter showed himself to be a star.
Ripping off big gains around end and
off tackle, Steketee was the chief Wol-
verine ground gainer, but in hitting
the line for substantial gains, Usher
played an almost equally good game.
His main feat was to snare Banks'
pass for the first touchdown. In his
defensive play Nelson was especially
strong.
Goetz Continues to Star
Captain Goetz in his last perform-
ance on Ferry field continued the
work, which stamps him as All-Amer-
ican material for a tackle berth and
as one of the best linemen in the
West during recent years. Time and
time again this giant opened 'up
holes for the Wolverine backs. Of es-
pecial import was his work when
Michigan plunged the ball across for
the second touchdown in the fourth
quarter. At defensive tackle - Vick
plugged the hole, which Captain Jack-
son was reputed ready to open, and
his offensive work at center was al-
so of first order.
The whole Michigan eleven played
like a new machine and a team in-
spired, and, except for the first few
minutes of play and two long passes
at the end of the game, solved the
Maroon plays. For the first time since
the Illinois game the Wolveriens
showed a consistent offense, capable
of taking the ball down the field by

Wisconsin, 14; Illinois, v.
Iowa, 28; Minnesota, 7.
Northwestern, 14; Purdue, .
Notre Dame, 13; Indiana, V.
Cornell, 34; Columbia, 0.
Detroit, 29; W. Va. Wesleyan,
Dartmouth, 44; Pennsylvania,,
Princeton, 20; Yale, 0.
Harvard, 27, Brown, 0.

0.

By canvassing all houses inhabited
Pontiac Club Admits Women Members by students it is hoped that a 100 per-
The Pontiac club at its meeting cent membership will be secured on
Wednesday night admitted women of the campus. Booths will also be
the University to membership for the placed along the diagonal walk and on
first time. There are now over 75 State street. The society has asked
members. Murray Van Wagoner, pres- for student volunteers to distribute
ident of the Pontiacs, asks all stu- literature and assist in soliciting sub-
dents from Pontiac who are not al- R scriptions. Those wishing to give their
ready members to attend the next services have been requested to leave
meeting. The time and place will be their names at the main office in the

THE WEATHER

Probably Snow Flurries; no Change jalleys, and billiard room did a rec-' es to applause,

giving encores

for

In Te tperature ' ord-breaking business.

each number. announced soon.

McCormick building. steady plugging.

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