100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1920 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_ ,

3 TICKET SLEI

PROF. R. W. AIGLER EXPLAINS,
PLAN USED BY ATHLETIC AS-,
SOCIATION
Editor The Michigan Daily:
A large number of people, alumni,
students, faculty, and others-have
been greatly dsiappointed by their
in ability to get tickets for the Chi-
bago game. May I take this oppor-
tunity to say that everybody connect-
ed with the affairs of the Athletic as-
sociation regrets thr t the situation is
such that these disappointments are
unavoidable.
The plan for ticket distribution for
this game was precisely the same as
that which has been followed for
many years in the big Homecoming
games. While some inevitably got the
poorer seats, the plan generally
speaking worked to the satisfaction of
the applicant for accommodations.
Office Swamped
The wholly unexpected and un-
precedented demand for seats for the
Chicago game literally swamped the
Athletic association office, making it
necessary to cut down and refuse ap-
plications, much to the disappoint-
ment of those who countd upon be-
ing cared for. Apparently it would
have been possible to sell 50,000 tick-
ets had they been available. It should
not be necessary to say that these
refusals were made entirely imper-
sonally and impartially.
The basic idea of the present plan
has been to give to each group -
the alumni, students, faculty, and
supports of the visiting team-an
even chance. Space is roughly ap-
portioned to each group, and within
any such group the practice has been
and is, first come, first served, so
long as the tickets last. The only de-
parture from the order of preference
based on order of receipts has been
in the student group in, which there

were made sub-groups based on num-
ber of years on the campus. Thus al
student who has been here two years
will ordinarily get a better seat than
another who has been here only one,
even though the latter's application
was in earlier.
Revision Necessary
The present experience has shown
very clearly that there must be a rad-
ical revision in the plan for the fu-
ture. It is probable that it will be
concluded that the limit in number of
tickets purchasable by any one per-
son must be materially reduced from
six, its present figure, with prefer-
ence of course as heretofore to stu-
deuts; alumni, and others connected
with the University. It will be neces-
sary also to give serious considera-
tion to the possibility of adding to our
present seating capacity.
(Signed)
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
ATHLETICS.
By Ralph W. Aigrer, Chairman,
Board in Control of Athletics. -
Athletic Offie
Has Hectic Week
There are lots of unpleasant jobs
in the world. Think of the poor in-
nocent that will have to hand out the
five or ten per cent to the heart-
broken widows and hollow-eyed or-
phans who. got hooked in the Ponzi
fiasco!
Think of the mistaken moral en-
thusiast whb sentenced himself to sit
through yards and yards of cinema
films portraying the incident of the
Roman nose and the custard pie, or
Eloise and Gabblehard doing a half-
nelson while the stereotyped sun
sinks majestically to rest just behind
the cardboard mountains!
Athletie Office Wins

office have been awarded the ignoble
prize for the present season.
It was all in the matter of tickets.
It seems there were not enough of
them to go around and those stu-
dents who got left out in the distribu-
tion have, quite naturally, been a bit
incensed. They have been taking
their ire to the Athletic office dur-
ing the past week and passing it
around to everyone in sight with en-
thusiasm and impartiality.
Statistics on the actual number of
ultimatums delivered are lacking, but
they will tell you up there that the
frenzied days preceding the war were
quiet and peaceful in contrast. Due
to the superior diplomatic ability ex-
hibited, however, no actual hostilities
developed. -
Fortune Returned
Twelve hundred checks have been
written to students alone in refund
of the money they sent in for extra1
tickets.,. These checks cover amounts1
from $2.50 to $10, and it is safe to es-
tinmate that the total will reach $7,000.
In additioi to this, at least $12,000
has been returned to alumni.
The seating capacity of Ferry field
is 22,500. Officials of the Athletic as-
sociation estimate that 50,000 tickets
could have been sold for today's
game.
They also say that the reason for
the early sale of the tickets was heavy
demand by the senior, . junior, and
sophomore classes. An average was
taken of the applications received
from seniors and it was found that
three tickets per man were requested.
For various reasons 500 athletic
book coupons were returned to t hr
senders. The Student council is con-
ducting an investigation of this in an
effort to prevent its re-occurrence next
year.
But whatever the Athletic office
may have done, it hasn't exactly en-
joyed the past week.
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use The Michigan Daily.---Adv.

Swimmi ngJMakes
Forward Strides
(By Wallace F. Elliott)
From an embryo squad of four men
two years ago to tryouts which will
number nearly 100 this year is the
enviable record of Michigan's newest
intercollegiate sport-swimming. E31-
ier Drulard, '20, then an instructor in
gymnasium work, was one of the first
to conceive the idea of a Wolverine
tank squad, and it is largely to his un-
tiring efforts as volunteer coach that
the success of the present organiza-
tion is due.
Coach Drulard has been handicappe,
from the start by the lack of facilities
and thq need of financial support, but
he has never suffered from want of
good material. Last year the athletic,
association permitted the scheduling of
two outside meets, one of which was
held in Ann Arbor with. the Detroit
Athletic club, in which the star per-
formers from the big city emerged
easy victors, and the dther was at
Grand Rapids with the Y. M. C. A. team
of that city. Michigan again emerged
on the short end of the score, but the
final result was in doubt until the
swimming of the relay, which was won
by Grand Rapids by inches.
This year the Wolverines are out for
revenge, and tentative meets with
-Grand Rapids, M. A. C., and the De-
troit Athletic club are now on the
schedule. It si hoped that other dual
events can be arranged in the near
fulare and that Michigan may be per-
mitted to enter some of her best men
in the Conference meet at Evanston
next March. Some of the times made
by Maize and Blue swimmers already,
this year have far surpassed those
made at the Conference meetlast year.
The big pool at the Union is still in
an incomplete state and the support
of the alumni is greatly needed. To
finish the work $50,000 is needed.
Two alumni have agreed to contribute
one-sixth of the required sum each

on the condition that others will come
forward with like support. Certainly
the spirit with which the students of
\ichigan have taken up the sport is
ceserving of some recognition from
her alumni.
TOCIMESTAENl"TORAY
In an effort to obtain 800 new sub-
scriptions immediately, the Michigan
Chimes, the campus opinion organ of
the University, is today appealing to
the alumni to keep in touch with the
University and its life through the
columns of that magazine.
The business management is staging
a whirlwind campaign and is putting
the magazine before practically every
visitor and old grad in Ann Arbor to-
day. At .Ferry field and at other
prominent, places on the campus

booths have been placed to facilitate
the taking of subscriptions.
The second issue for the year is be-
ing sold throughout the town as well
as at Ferry field between the halves.
The management believes that the pic-
ture of Yost which adorns the cover
will prove helpful in selling both the
single copies and subscriptions as
well.
TheChimes, which was printed for
the first time a year ago, has as its
purpose the expression of student and
alumni opinion on matters pertainuig
to University life. In the first issue
of the year President Marion L. Bur-
ton talked to the student body by
means of his article, "The Quest of
Quality." Other articles by students,
faculty men and alumni will appear in
the issues which will follow this last
one. In the next issue Chimes hopes
to have a resume of the football sea-
son, discussing in detail just what the
causes of our defeats and victories
have been.

N6 liliitlli illillllllll1glililili liiilili llillilli gil i nii lilillilliiliiii nlil g
-
LEARN TO DANCE
AT
--
and Refined Dance Studios
-WUER TH ARC ADE
:a w

Yes,
world
ones.

there are lots of jobs in the
that aren't exactly pleasant
But the men in the Athletic'

COME

TONIGHT

. . _.v
ii
r' 9

w

SHOWS
START

Ru

In His Latest

Success

AT

7:00
8:30

66

Ntm.. ST

1 L11 !

ENID

7

NETT

A Laugh Getter

IN

"Her Husband's Friend"

"HOW HE COULD DANCE" I
Bray Picto and Educational
Coming Sunday:--CHAS. RAY, "THE VILLAGE SLEUTH"

A Romantic Comedy Drama of Brilliant and Hearty Laughs

Coming Sunday:---LOUISE CLAUM, in "THE LEOPARD WOMAN"

I I l I fIII I IIIf 1 I fI I ll 1111111[fill I lllll ll1 lllIf i lfi1 Illlll

.. {

DANCES

FRIDAY

AND

SATURDAY

BEST MUSIC IN TOWN.

TICKETS AT

GRAHAM'SSLATER'S AND FISHER'S

I

1i11111 11111 111111111 r 1111111111 II 11111111 1111 tllI II 111111111111111i1111111111111111i111i1

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan