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November 13, 1920 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAW '1

___._..

YOSTMEN BATTL
MARONSTODAY
(Continued from page One)
From all the dope it appears as if
the teams are as evenly matched as
two football elevens can be. Com-
parative scores place them on an al-
most exactly equal footing. Illinois
Illinois beat Michigan 7 to 6 and Chi-
cago 3 to 0, whereas Ohio defeated
the Wolverines 14 to 7 as compared
with their 7 to 6 victory over the Ma-
'roon team.
As the critics are saying with re-
gard to the Ohio-Illinois game next
Saturday, it looks as if the team that
gets the breaks will win. Michigan
has a slight advantage in playing on
her home field, but this will not mean
a great deal, as a large crowd of Chi-
cago rooters are coming down to wit-
ness the game.
Banks at Quarter
The Michigan line-up is the same
as that which started the Ohio game
last week with the single exception
of Banks at quarter. Jack Dunn's
leg is still bothering him consider-
ably and there is little likelihood of
the diminuive quarter getting into
the contest. The Maroon team will
also be without the services of its
regular quarter, Cole. Another change
is the placing of Timmie at fullback,
Palmer going to right half.
An analysis of the two teams shows
Michigan stronger in the backfield
with Chicago superior on the line.
The visitors have no such offensive
star as Steketee, or so sure a defen-
sive back as Nelson. On the other
hand, the Maroon forward is consid-
erably heavier from tackle to tackle
than that of the Wolverines and is
made up of some of the most expe-
rienced linemen in the west. Cap-
tain Jackson, Hartong, Reber, Pheney
Gilberts Chocolates at Tice's, 117 So.
Main-A4dv.
SUGAR BOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHINGI
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our

and McGuire are a quintet it would'
be hard to beat anywhere.
Play Likely to Be Open
It is likely that the Wolverines will
use a more open style of play than
they have exhibited at any time this
year, especially if it is found that
ground cannot be gained through the
strong Chicago line.
Cappon will probably start at end,
although if his leg is troubling him
Abe Cohn will be the choice. Abe
demonstrated that he is a capable
substitute at an end in the Ohio
game, especially on defense. Jack Per-
rin will undoubtedly get into the fray
before the final whistle. His speed
is always a great asset toward the
end of a game when the opposing
team is pretty well worn out.
Both teams will be numbered this
afternoon for the first time on Ferry
field this year.
DOUGLAS, BACON FIRST TO.
TAPE IN HILL AND DALE RUN
Crossing the line well ahead of his
competitors, D. C. Douglas, '22E, was
winner in the All-campus cross coun-
try run held yesterday afternoon. The
second man, J. A. Bason, '23, also fin-
ished with his position secure. Dou-
glas' time was 16:5, and Bacons'
16:24, the remainder of the field fin-
ishing well bunched. G. E. Tilliton,
;24, took third honors; R. J. Ross,
'24, was fourth; D. A. Ventres, '22.
was fifth across the line, and E. C.
Earhart, '22, was the last of the.six
numeral winners, crossing the mark
a bare foot ahead of J. 0. Rearick,
'24. The time was slow, but this was
due to the coldness of the weather
and the biting wind which held the
runners back as they rounded the
boulevard.
Paronize Daily Advertiers.--Adv.

for the past several seasons; has
C09CH ST96 1190S 30 handicapped him to such an extent FR U TLTSBC
that he has had to follow his team t d p iro
M A~OOS 10 ATTLEthrough the daily practice ensconced D
M nra motor car. He has regained per- [p M CLUB MEET[
fect condition, however, and in walk-
CHICAGO KENTOR REFUSES TO ing from the Union to Ferry field dis- SESSIONS TO BE HELD THIS
DISCUSS TODAY'S played no traces of his recent ail- MORNING AT
GAME ment. UNION
Other members of the squad are not
(By Frank McPike) in such good shape. Redmond, a Members of the "M" club will hold
Dr. A. A. S'agg, University of Chi- giant lineman, is on crutches as a re- their regular fall meeting at 10:30
cago football mentor, led his 35 Mar- suit of a recent injury, and several of o'clock this morning at the Union.
bon charges in from the Midway yes- his team mates, including Cole, stellar Because of the numerous matters to
terday at 3:45 o'clock. Ooming direct half back, are temporarily hors du be brought before the club, it was
from a heart breaking battle with Il- combat because of disabled arms. thought advisable to shift the meet-
linois last Saturday, the visitors. nour- "I brought them all along regard- ing time to the morning, that there
ish a wholesome respect for the ma- less of their condition," said Stagg. would be sufficient time to discuss
chine that held Zuppke's Indians to "This Michigan air will be a great these matters fully. It was originally
a 7-6 score two weeks ago. tonic for them." planned to hold the meeting after
That there is no overconfidence in the dinner, but the time would have
the Chicago camp is evidenced by FRIDAY'S SOCCER PLAY SEES been too short before the game.
Coach Stagg's reticence when asked HARDEST CONTESTED GAMES This being Hdmecoming day for
for a statement concerning today's the alumni, more members than ever
game. He discussed football in all its Yesterday's play in the interfratern- before have signified their intentions
phases, reminisced freely about last ity soccer tournament resulted in the of attending . More than 65 cards
year's Maroon baseball nine that made hardest fought games yet played. Phi have been received, and it is expected
a successful trip through the Orient, Gamma Delta defeated Phylon, 1 to 0, that this number will be increased.'
but when it came to attempting the in a hotly contested game which was Following the dinner, the members
probable outcome of the battle this finally decided when the Phi Gamma will proceed to the game, where they
afternoon, he just didn't function. Delta team put a penalty kick over will sit on the side lines or in the
Reports have eminated from the the goal line. In the second game special section reserved for their
Chicago school of late that "the old Signus defeated Phi Chi, 2 to 0, in a use. Victor Pattengill, president of,
man" isn't what he used to be in game which showed a powerful offense the club, will preside at the meeting,
health. Rheumatism has laid him low on the part of the victors. which all "M" club men who happen

to be in Ann Arbor are urged tp at-
tend.
Among the visitors there will be
F. J. Blanding, '10, baseball pitcher
and former member of the Cleveland
Americans; C. F. Cooley, '70, the old-
est living member of the "M" club
and a former baseball player; James
DePress, '06, baseball player; E. Han-
aran, '12, holder of the Varsity mile
record; Judge Ray Hart, '95, base-
ball player; Carl Johnson, '20, track
star; D. C. May, '09E, track captain;
J. F. McLean, '00,track captain; G.
A. Miller, '00, pitcher against Cor-
nell's famous team; V. Pattengill, '11,
president of "M" club; Floyd Rowe,
'08, track captain; S. W. Sedgwich,
'19, track captain; G. C. Thompson,
'13, football captain; J. Utley, '03,
baseball pitcher; F. L. Conklin, '10,
football captain; F. J. Longman, '06,
football player; J. Enzenroth, '10E,
baseball captain; J. C. Garrells, '07E,
*one world record in track; W. Hes-
ton. '04, All-tIme All American; J.
D. Hubbard, '87, former member of
Chicago Cubs and now a. member of
the Athletec Board of Control; J. E.
Duffy, '95; L. M. Thurber, '00, who
made his letter riding a bicycle; Hon.
G. P. Codd, '07, track star, just elect-
ed U. S. congressman.
Paronize Daily Advertiers.-Adv.

I

May
T.

To

Nis F.t Alle C.Tl M rif
tter not loose any time this morning in getting down to N. F. Allen Co.'s Rconstruction Sale -it's the biggest sale
and creating more excitement than any sale Ann Arbor has ever known. People from far and near are crowding
e every day. High grade Men's Suits and Furnishing Goods going at a Big Sacrifice - Nothing Cheap but the
Come down today and look over the finest line of merchandise you ever saw and buy now while the buying is good.

Be
in town
the store
Price.I

GOO:) 'TABLES, GOOD CUES,
GOOD SERVICE
To get real enjoyment out of
a game of billiards, the equip-
ment must be top-notch.
You want good tables-sound
cushions and new, clean cloth.
You want good cues-well-bal-
anced, of the right weight, with
tips that hold the chalk.
You want good service--at-
tendants who are quick to antic-
ipate your needs.
You'll find the best of service
and equipment here. Come in
and play a game or two, today.
HUSTON BROS.
Pocket and Carom Billiards.
Cigars and Candies.
Soft Drinks and Light Lunches.
Cigarettes and Pipes.
"We Try to Treat You Right"
No. 5

MEN'S SUITS AND OVERCOATS, WORTH UP TO $45.00 -
RECONSTRUCTION PRICE $29.95
Men's and Young Men's High Grade Suits and Overcoats in every wanted
material, worth to $45. Snappy and nifty, all the last minute styles.
Reconstruction price ........................................

4

.95

Last years customers
One half block South
of "*MAJ"

-1

I

f

We Pack We Mail
-
-
= AN BOX
- _
OUJ will agree with us that this box
= of blue with the M of gold makes
a most fitting gift. Filled with our own
pack of Fresh Chocolates, it will, indeed
be most apprebiated. '=
Or you may preter a Chinese Basket
or Japanese Box this time.
709 North University
HNi _HHH ll iill iil~ 1|||11111111111111111111|1111|1!

SUITS AND OVERC2ATS SUITS AND OVERCOATS SUITS AND OVERCOATS SUITS AND OVERCOATS
Worth to $50.00 Worth to 606.00 Worth to $35.00 Worth to $40.00
RECONSTRUCTION PRICE RECONSTRUCTION PRICE RECONSTRUCTION PRICE RECONSTRUCTION PRICE -
$32.95 $38.95 $17.95 $22.95
MEN'S UNI2N SUITS MEN'S OVERCOATS MEN'S PANTS
Men's $1.50 Union Suits-all sizes Men's $3.50 work pants-real value
RECONSTRUCTION PRICE Men's Overcoats to $70.00 values, very high grade mate- RECONSTRUCTION PRICE
95c a'ls in very best o styles-your choice at our $1.95
P econstruction price . .......... ....$48.95
MEN'S UNION SUITS MEN'S SILK HOSE
Men's $2.50 Union Suits-all sizes MEN'S OVERCOATS Men's $1.25 & $1.50 silk thread hose
RECONSTRUCTION PRICE RECONSTRUCTION PRICE
$1.85 Men's Overcoats to $80.00 values, all very high grade ma- 95c
terial and nifty styles, good range of sizes-
MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS your choice at our Reconstruction price... .$58.95 BOYS' SUITS
Men's $2.50 Shirts - good patterns Boys' $12.00 suits - sizes 8 to 18
RECONSTRUCTION PRICE MEN'S FLANNEL SHIRTS RECONSTRUCTION PRICE
$1.49 Men's $3.00 Flannel Shirts in the usual colors- $6.95
Reconstruction price ...................$2.19
MEN'S HA TS BOYS' SUITS
Men's $8.00 high grade felt soft hat M Boys' $18.00 suits - sizes 8 to 18
All shades and eery latest styles MENBS FLANNEL SHIRTS Best of Materials
ECeyTIzePIE Dn' 50 lnnlSitAn exceptionally good suit
RECONSTRUCTION PRICE Men's $5.00 Flannel Shirts, the best materials- RECONSTRUCTION PRICE
$4.95 Reconstruction price ....... ..........$3.89 $10.95

I

it

A,

Extra Concert
Series
Course Tickets
$2.00 - $2.50

UNITED STATES MARINE BAND
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Saturday, yNemberl3
"THE PRSIOEetIT'S ONN BAND" Tiokets at University School of Musio

Prices For Band

Concert

$1.00 - 75c - SOc

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