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November 13, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-13

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I

THE WEATHER.
FAIR AND COLD, EXCEPT
!SNOW FLURRIES

4

t l

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I

DAY AND IGHT WIRE
SERVICE

A

VOL XXXI. No. 35.

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1920.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

.

_

YOSTMEN BATTLE CHICAGO TODAY

ALUMNI AID IN
RAISING PEP FOR
CNicCOC GME
EATON OFFICIATES AT MEETING;t
INTRODUCES EX-PRESIDENT c
OF UNION HOGAN
FRANK MURPHY, '14
GIVES ROUSING TALK
Varsity Band, New Songs and Yells
with Pictures of Team Add
to Spirit
Alumni and students of Michigan
united in Hill auditorium last night
to organize pep for the Chicago foot-
ball game to be played on Ferry field.
this afternoon.
Following the parade of the Varsity
band around the campus, the meeting
was opened at 7:30 o'clock by Paul
Eaton, '21, president of the Union, who
acted as chairman. Eaton introduced
Carl T. Hogan, '20E, after Varsity
Cheerleader Cuthbert had led the
crowd in yells.
Hogan, remembered as one of the
best of last year's speakers, roused
great enthusiasm in his audience with
his inspiring words. The necessity of
backing up the efforts of the Varsity
with a maximum of constructive en-
thusiasm was his talking point, which
found favor with his hearers. -
Hogan continued, stressing the ne-
cessity for supporting the twice de-
feated Michigan eleven, which is play-
ing Chicago for the first time in 16
years on the Michigan field. This is'
cause for the utmost determination ons
the' part of every Michigan student,
the determination to win, and avenge
the effect of the 'previous defeats, on'
the part of all students of the Uni-
versity is needed a great effort, an'
effort to back up what 'the alumni
have done for Michigan in gettin.
athletes here. Michigan students must'
keep these men eligible so that they
can put forth their best efforts for
the University.,
Frank Murphy, '14, spoke from the
alumni standpoint. -Mr. Murphy i'
one of the hardest workers for Mich-
igan and Michigan athletics, his ef-
forts being mainly through the De-
troit Alumni association.
"The oath taken by all Athenian
youths to leave Athens 'better, finer.
and more beautiful/ than they found
it' is inspiration enough for Michi-
gan students. It is the duty of every
man and woman in the University t
follow this idea and do his or her
best for Michigan," was Murphy's
message.
From the first cry of. "coats" the
crowd, which completely filled thr
auditorium, overflowed with pep. New
yells were tried, and -the indivdual
pictures of the Varsity players
thrown on the screen, were cheered
The Varsity band opened the meet-
ing with the "Victors" and "Varsity"
and ended with the Michigan hymn.
"The Yellow and Blue." Several new
songs were tried out for the game
tomorrow.
Red Cross Roll Call Next Week,
The Red Cross membership roll call
is to be held on the campus next'
week. Hazel M. Whitland, '21, has
charge of the women's division.

TO SELL YEAR BOOKS
All last year's Michiganens-
lans not called for this week
will be sold.I

Bioth Teams Have
Equal Chance To
Win B ig Contest
Rivals of 29 years standing will
clash when Michigan meets Chicago
at 2 o'clock this afternoon on Ferry
field. Football relations between the
two schools began in '1891 and were
continued until Michigan's withdraw-
Michigan Position Chicago
11 Cappon or
22 Cohn. L.E..Strohmeier 39
1 Goetz.....L.T. Jackson 1
Capt Capt.
3 Dunn-e ..L.G....Hartong 18
8 Vick ......C...N...Reber 7
4 Wilson ... ...Pheney 3
14 Johns ....R.T.... McGuire 2
10 Goebel ....R.E.. Halladay 15
15 Banks .... Q.B......Tatge 8
6 Steketee ...L.H... Hutchin-
son 9 or Rouse 6
7 Usher .., R.H. Palmer 41
12 Nelson ....F.B... Timmie 21
Officials: Referee-J. H. Nich-
ols (Oberlin). Umpire-H. B.
Hackett (Army). Field judge-
J. W. Means (Pennsylvania).
Head linesman-H. G. Hedges,
(Dartmouth). Length of quart-
ers-15 minutes.
al from the Conference in 1905, be-
ing resumed on her return. in 1918.
To date the Wolverines have the
edge on their opponents from !the
Windy City, having won nine games
to Chicago's seven. In points Michi-
gan shows an even greater superior-
ity, the count beig 184 to 115. How-
ever, the Maroon team has the honor
of having won last year, 13 to 0.
Whether the 1920 season must be
,onsidered a wholly unsuccessful one
from a Michigan standpoint will be
'letermined this afternoon. If the
Yostmen can put across the victory
which the whole student body is pull-
ing for, the chances of beating Min-
nesota next week will be greatly en-'
1'anced because of the increased con-
fidence which the team will acquire.
Two victories at the end of the sea-
son would do much toward taking the
bad taste of the Illinois and Ohio
eames out of the Michigan mouths.
After all, it would be no disgrace to
finish the season with victories
against all but the two best teams in
the Conference. o
(Continued on page Three)
Medal Blanks Supplied by Red Cross'
Any ex-service man who wishes td
apply for a Victory medal mayobtain
the necessary blanks at the Red'
Gross office in the Bornwell build-
ng. corner of Fourth and Huron
streets. A new supply has just been
"eceived.

US MARINE BAN
CONCERTTONIGHT
Ensemble and Solo Program Composed
of Well Known and Treas-
ured Pieces
ORGANIZATION HAS BEEN
IN EXISTENCE 100 YEARS
(By L. L. N.)
The United States Marine band, rec-"
ognized as the world's greatest con-
cert band, will give Ann Arbor music
patrons a rare treat at 8 o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium in the form
of a very, unique ensemble and solo
program arranged for the occasion.
Consisting mainly of well known and
treasured selections. this concert is
destined to be the most popular of
the season.
Has World Wide Reputation
The United States Marine band has
been in existence for more than a
century and has gained a world wide
reputation. Its members are all men
of ability and reputation, while the
average time of service of the mem-
bers is eighteen years. This with the
regularity of rehearsals has given
them unity of ensemble which does
not ordinarily exist among bands.
Its Ann Arbor appearance was
brought about through the joint nego-
tiations of the Chamber of Commerce
and the University School of Music.
Program Announced
The program follows:
Overture, "Tannhauser," Wagner;
nocturne, "Dream of Love," Liszt;
cornet solo, "Arbucklinian," Hartman
(musician Arthur S. Whitcomb); "In-
vitation to the Dance," Weber-Wein-
gartner (transcribed for band by Wil-
liam H. Santleman); prologue. "Oag-j
liacci," Leoncavallo; concerto for twol
violincellos, Kummer, (musicians
Fritz Mueller and Gerold Schon);
"Southern Rhapsody," Hosmer; Sec-
ond Polonaise," Liszt; "Star Spangled
Banner." -

CHIMES FEATURIS
YOST'S PICTURE
With a photograph of Coach Field-
ing H. Yost, in football outfit, as its
cover illustration and a frontispiece
of Captain Angus Goetz, the November
issue 'of the Chimes makes its ap-
pearance on the campus today.
Stuart H. Perry, '94, editQr of the
Adrian Telegram, has written the is-
sue's leading article entitled "The
Newspaper Game." A contribution by
Prof. Robert M. Wenley is also a fea-
ture of the fall number. A short
story by Rosemary Arnold, "An In-
vitation for Criticism" by Prof. A. D.
Moore, and an article on "College
Men and Politics" by Douglas Clap-
perton, '21L, are also included.
Subscriptions for the Chimes will
be taken all day today at the Union
and at Ferry field before the game.
All students and alumni wishing to
sign up for the magazine are asked to
do so at this time.
WOLVEINE RUNNERS
MEET ILINOIS TODAY
Headed by Coach Gill and Captain
Allman, Illinois' cross country team
arrived in Ann Arbor last night for
this morning's hill and dale battle
with Michigan's harriers. The Illini
are confident of victory, for, though
they were beaten by Purdue as was
Michigan, they put up a far stiffer
race. Other than Allman, whose
name is known to every Conference
track enthusiast, there is Dusenberry
a man whose running was to a large
extent responsible for the Illinois vic-
tory in the Conference meet last
year.
While there is no doubt of the fact
that Illinois is represented by a
strong squad, Coach Farrell is far
from beaten. Captain Brannan and
his men are determined to wie out
the Blue and Gold victory of las
year, and this determination may b(
a large factor in the final outcome o
the race.
The men will go on their marks
at 10:45 this morning at the Homeop-
atic hospital, and the event shoulr'
be over 30 minutes later. It is hoped
that a big crowd will be out to give
the Wolverine harriers their sup-
port.
A lumni Gather
r'orHomecoming
Gathering from far and wide to
see the Wolverine eleven go into bat-
tle with Chicago this afternoon, thou-
sands of graduates are expected to
make today one of the greatest Mich-
igan homecomings.
The advance guard, eager to catch
the old time inspiration at last night's
pep meeting, came into town yester-
day afternoon and evening, and by
noon Ann Arbor will be in complete
possession of the invaders.
Fraternities have made prepara-
tions to entertain an unusually larg
number of guests. Requests for rooms
at the Union have been pouring in
for some time, and rooms in private
residences are at a premium.
Have Printed 4,000 Programs
Printing of the 4,000 athletic pro-
grams was completed yesterday by the

Ann Arbor Press, and copies were on
sale on State street during the after-
noon. The price of the program is 2F
cents. Additional copies will be sold
at Ferry field this afternoon p-eced-
ing the game.

T1WO CONTESTS NEW TO, MICHIGAN
WILL BE INAGRTDIN FALL

FOR SCORES, PHONE 960
Football scores will be given
out by a special operator at
fThe Daily. Call 960 after 6
o'clock.
DEFENDS TICKET SAE
PROF. R. W. AIGLER EXPLAINS
PLAN USED BY ATHLETIC AS.
SOCIATION

SOPHS
TO

AND FRESHMEN TO MARCH
FIELD AFTER DONNING
PAINT

SHUTTLE RACE, OTHER
GAME, USED BEFORE
Entire Student Council with 36 or 40
Upperclassmen Will
Officiate

MEETING PLACES

l

WILL ISSUE EXTRA

Containing a running story of
the Chicago game, The Daily
will have an extra on sale at
the Ferry field gates a very
few minutes after the final whis-
tIe blows this afternoon.
Efforts are being made to run
I the edition off the presses in the
shortest possible time. In spite1
of the attempt at speed the ac-
count of the contest will be play-
by-play and complete in every j
respect.'

Editor The Michigan Daily:
A large number of people, alumni,
students, faculty, and others-have
been greatly dsiappointed by their
in ability to get tickets for the Chi-
cago game. May I take this oppor-
tunity to say that everybody connect-
ed with the affairs of the Athletic as-
sociation regrets that the situation is
such that these disappointments are
unavoidable.
The plan for ticket distribution for
this game was precisely the same as
that which' has been followed for
many years in the big Homecoming
games. While soma: inevitably got the
poorer seats, the plan generally
=peaking worked to the satisfaction of
the applicant for accommodations.
Office Swamped
The wholly unexpected and un-
nrecedented demand for seats for the
Chicago game literally swamped the
Athletic association office, making it
necessary to cut down and refuse ap-
nlications, much to the disappoint-
ment of those who count;u upon be-
ing cared for. Apparently it would
have been possible to sell 50,000 tick-
ets had they been available. It should
"iot be necessary to say that these
refusals were made entirely imper-
'onally and impartialfy.
The basic idea of the present plan
has been to give to each group -
the alumni, students, faculty, andf
supports of the visiting team-an
,even chance. Space is roughly -ap-
nor~ioned to each group, and within
any such group the practice has been
and is, first come, first served, so
long as the tickets last. The only de-
-arture from the order of preference
based on order of receipts has been
in the student group in which there
were made sub-groups based on num-
her of years on the campus. Thus a
student who has been here two years
will ordinarily get a better seat than
another who has been here only one,
even though the latter's application
was in earlier.
Revision Necessary
The present experience has shown
very clearly that there must be a rad-
ical revision in the plan for the fu-
ture. It is probable that it will be
concluded that the limit in number of
tickets purchasable by any one per-
son must be materially reduced from
six, its present figure, with prefer-
ence of course as heretofore to stu-
deats, alumni, and others connected
with the University. It will be neces-
sary also to give serious considera-
tion to the possibility of adding to our
present seating capacity.
-(Signed)
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
ATHLETICS.
By Ralph W. Aigler, Chairman,
Board in Control of Athletics.

Classes will meet on the cam-
pus at 9 o'clock.
Sophomores-In front of Tap-
pan hall.
Freshmen-In front of the Li-
brary.
Student councilmen will meet
at Ferry field at 9 o'clock.

Rivalry which has been nourished
in the bosoms of the two under class-
es will be loosed with Vigor this
morning and for the first time this
year the classes of '23 and '24 wille
have an opportunity to match their
prowesses.
After falling in on the campus and
donning+the red and green fighting
paint, the two classes will march in
body to Ferry field, where officials
will take charge and conduct the an-
nual fall games.
Pillow Fight First Game
The first game will be the pillow
fight on the greased bars. There will
be nine individual pillow fights and a
class to win this event must take
five out of the nine. Men for this
contest were picked by the class cap-
tains yesterday afternoon. The team
winning this contest is to be award-
ed one point.
The second game is to be the shut-
tle relay race, which will also count
one point. There will be 20 men on
each team in this contest, 10 on each
side of the field, and the object is to
relay the flags with these men, the
class bringing in their flag first to
be declared the winner.
Sophs to Guard Cane
The third and last game will be the
cane contest. A cane will be given
to the sophomores and they will in
turn form around it and attempt to
hold it against the attacks of the
freshmen until the 15 minute period
is over. The class possessing the cane
at. the end of 15 minutes will be de-
clared the winner and will be award-
ed one point.
The entire Student council will of-
ficiate at the games and in addition
there will be between 35 and 40 up-
perclassmen, other than the council-
men, on hand to guard against slug-
ging or other foul practices.
Old Clothes Suggested
All participants in the games must
wear tennis shoes and it would be
advisable to wear old clothes. If the
games can be started by 9:30 o'clock,
they should be over by 11:30 o'clock,
which will give everyone time to get
ready for the Chicago game in the
afternoon.
Herbert G. Dunphy, '23, is captain
of the sophomores and Harry Kipke,
'24, is captain of the freshmen. The
Student council committee in charge
is as follows: Chairman, C. G. Wet-
zel, '21E, John Cary, '22L, George'Dut-
field, '21, Roswell Dillon, '21E, and
George Gregory, '22E.

?oster Appears, Campus L.irns
That Freshmen Haven 't Grown Up
Remember the dear old high school -well, we hope Frank Murphy did-
days when we used to convene in the n't see any of them.
morning to the tune of "Good Morn- The poster invited the' sophomore
ing Dear Teacher?" Remember when class to descend into the heated por-
the pedantic principal rapped the tion of that land from which no trav
edge of his desk with a ruler and de- eler returns. It called the second
manded that little Freddie sling the year class slackers, and added an ad.
quietus on the gum-chewing act? You jective which, to put it mildly, did-
don't remember? Well, that's too bad, n't reflect a lot of glory on . the
for the latest arrivals in our Univer- writer.
sity have started out to set up some Little boys, very little boys, were
such regime at Michigan. They seem induced to pass out the posters. They
to remember. Awfully easy to get be- may have been freshmen. We do not
hind the times these days, isn't it? know. They looked like it.
A poster made its appearance on Anyway, the class of '24 has made
the campus yesterday. It was a '24 its debut.
poster. Aside from that fact, it was Speaking of being "collich," won't it
awful. Considering that fact, it was be great to return in 1924?

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