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November 11, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer.
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this. paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ceses matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daisy office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications."
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertior.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE t. BROPHY JR.
News Editor..........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Edito Adams . W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. 1. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood JA enti
Sunday Editor......................J. A. Bernstein
Editorials............Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage. T. 3.Whinery
Assistant News............ ................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports. ....... ...... ...............Robert Angell
Women'sy Editor..... ...... ............ Mary D. La' e
Telegraph... ...............................West Gallogly
Telescope......................... .........Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer I,. Armstrong Kern
Paul G. Weber Robert E. Adams iughston McBain
Almena Barlow Norman C. Damon F~rank H. MePike
Elizabeth Vickery Byron Darntgn Geratd P. Overton
G. E. Clark Thomas E. Dewey Edward Lambrecht
George Reindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
Dorothy Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

believe that Yost and - the Maize and Blue will
triumph.
FALL IN !
Two years have elapsed since the suffering of
the greatest war in history was cut short by the
armistice between the Allies and Prussian militar-
ism. In the meantime the people of the world
have of one accord attempted to dismiss the memo-
ries of five years of conflict in which all man's in-
genuity was bent toward destruction. As the. war
has become an event of the past the cloud of de-
pression has lifted and we have again become en-
grossed in the present and future.
That we forget the unpleasant scenes of the war
is absolutely necessary for the healthy state of mind
which will allow us to do our duty as a nation and
face realities. But there is one phase of the strug-
gle we should never forget - the heroism and self-
sacrifice of those who went to fight and never re-
turned. No matter how dimly the war years them-
selves may stand out to us as we go about our peace-
time pursuits, these memories are sacred and should
be forever cherished.
For this reason Armistice day is more than "The
Day" of supreme rejoicing, It is the occasion when
we all leave our routine duties to voice again our
love, gratitude, and admiration for the heroes who
never returned.
All ex-service men, regardless of whether or not
they saw action and regardless of the innumerable
other distinctions that could be made, have been
called on by the University to express, in a man-
ner more fitting than words, this tribute that rises
in the hearts of every one of us. While some of
those chosen may modestly feel themselves unde-
serving of the privilege or may prefer to let people
learn in other ways that they have "done their bit,"
these are not important points. The paramount con-
sideration is that, with a forgetfulness of self akin
to that shown during the stress of the Great War,
our homage be properly rendered.
This afternoon every Michigan ex-service man is
going to do his part in the Armistice day program.
Faculty and students who have their uniforms here
will again form marching masses of color, while
those who haven't their "outfits" are going to do
the next best thing by falling in with the "plain
clothes batallion."
TH "Y" TANK PRIVILEGE
The informal swimming team representing the
University last year was a first class squad. It
owed no small measure of its success to the fact
that the members were permitted the free use of
the Y. M. C. A. tank for daily practice.
This year the privilege may be denied to them
because so many unauthorized men took :advantage
of the situation last season. The only possible
means of avoiding a similar occurrence this year
lies in-some system of registration whereby all of
the squad men may be recognized and outsiders
barred from the tank.
A requirement that members of the team pay
every time they take a practice dip is unnecessary
and unworthy of Michigan. The coach should find
no difficulty in providing a means of identification
for his men, so that the University may gain the
use of the tank for the season on the same plan as
last year.

GRAHAM

(Two Stores)
Agents for ROYCROFTERS

GRAHA-M

BOTHI ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALL

DETROIT UNTED LINES
Iu Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, nn Arbor and Jackson
(eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Lintiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and A.ery two
fours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit- 5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti onlyq
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

NOW IS THE TLME TO PLACE YOUR ORDER
FOR
PERSONAL CHRISTMAS GREETING
CARDS
PRINTED OR ENGRAVED

THE MAYER - SHAIRERCO.
STATIONERS, PRINTERS AND BINDERS
OFFTICE OUTTFITTERS

P~lionie 1404

112 South Main Street

-

i

Harry ii. Grundy

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGERĀ°........aLEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising .............---..-....-D. P. Joyce
Classifiep..................................Robt.MO. Kerr
Publication .. ........ .......... ........... M. Heath
Accounts................... ..............E. R. Priehs
Circulation.......... ........................-V.--.-illery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. "Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth

11

I

t , . ..

Night editors for this week are: Hugh Hitch-
cock, Monday night; T. W. Sargent, Jr., Tuesday
night; B. P. Campbell, Wednesday night; Thomas
Adams, Thursday night; B. P. Campbell, Friday
night; John McManis, Saturday night.
Persons wishing tosecure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The University Musical society which controls
the University School of Music, the Choral union,
and the University Symphony orchestra is now in
its forty-second year. It is organized under an
Act of the state of Michigan providing for the in-
corporation of associations not for pecuniary profit.
Its purpose is to "cultivate the public taste for
.music." In 1888, when Dean Albert A. Stanley
came to Ann Arbor, the society was reorganized as
it stands today. The School of Music is affiliated
with the University in that credits are interchanged
between the two organizations.

Let's not see any ex-service men on the
when the Armistice day parade swings into
this aftern'oon.

curb
view

'0

TOO MANY COOKS

Great teams are made out of co-operation, and
not out of discord. Victories are the stuff of loy-
alty and teamwork, not of individualism, distrust,
:back-talk, and criticism. There is a small group
on Michigan's campus which is deliberately throw-
ing obstacles in the way of Michigan success on the
gridiron by "riding" Coach Yost and his methods,
getting together in little aft'ermath gossip-circles to
play the game over again as they "would have
played it."
For this sort of individual, who fails to realize
that this is mid-season, with two more games to go
and a chance to raise our Conference rating from
zero to .500, the great loyal body of Michigan men
and women should display the genuine scorn which
disloyalty deserves. Such talkers are seldom will-
ing to go out and play for Michigan, for if they
did they would not be engaged in that kind of sew-.
ing circle occupation. The greatest tragedy of all
is that some ofthis spirit seems to have reached
even the ranks of the team, where, fostered by a
small group, it can do nothing but cause stagnation
and block the efforts of the ,coaches and the loyal
players to finish the season successfully.
Let's cone to our senses. We have no right to
listen to this propaganda, nor to permit its spread.
Whatever happens after the season is over, we are
now engaged in a struggle to prove that the Maize
and Blue can come back. The last two games have
brought nothing but honor to the men who fought
for us, even if victory was not ours. We have been
handicapped by injuries, but never, so far, by the
spirit of the quitter or the traitor. That spirit can
kill every chance we have. It is up to us to kill the
spirit first.
Fielding H. Yost and his assistants, our coaches
for- the season of 1920 (which does not end until
:he last whistle of the Minnesota game) are fight-
ing with every ounce of their energy, every atom
>f their skill, to win from Chicago and Minne,
ota. Every man on the team, every student-'in the
Jniversity, ought to be fighting with them toward
he same goal. Are we going to tie their hands
with criticism and disloyalty, or do we want Mich-
gan to win? There is only one answer ; and when
very Michigan man and woman has made it, we

Being a co-ed didn't prevent Alice Freeman
Palmer from making the New York Hall of Fame
along with Patrick Henry, Mark Twain, and other
famous Americans.
[ The Telescope
As the Girls See Us
The girls have many faults,
The boys have only two --
Everything they say
And everything they do.
A Short Story
CHAPTER I
The man was calm and collected as he searched
for the gas leak with a lighted match.
CHAPTER II
He may still be calm, but so far he has not been
collected.
VI NIS
Dear Noah:
A friend of mine, a second lieutenant, was acci-
dentally shot by his orderly last night. Can you
think of an appropriate epitaph? H.' W.
Why not something like this:
"Here lies Lieutenant who was acci-
dentally shot by his orderly.
"Well done, good and faithful servant."

1

IIH

emember that pretty girl who spoke
back there? Do you know her well?"
"Relatively well. She's my sister."

to you

lI
t pacrag. diso obtainablein

Today's nominee for the Royal Order of Oil-
Cans is the bird who, for fear you might mistake
him for an independent, begins and ends every sen-
tence with "my fraternity brothers."
Famous Closing Lines
"It all comes out in the end," he sighed, as he
squeezed the tube of toothpaste.
NOAH COUNT.

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