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November 07, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-07

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SECION

Sfir ti#an

ONE

I M
...

VOL. XXXI. No. 30. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENT

I

11

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If

BRY9NANMPEKSTo
BIG6UDIENCE IN
HLL. AUDITORIUM
POINTS OUT NEED OF EDUCATION
AS A DEBT WE OWE TO
SOCIETY
SAYS TREATY SHOULD
NOT BE PARTY ISSUE
Describes Governmental Methods;
Shows Need of Correcting
Abuses
William Jennings Bryan, speaking
last evening in Hill auditorium on the
subject, "But Where Are the Nine?"
took as his theme "Ingratitude" from
the Biblical story of the 10 lepers.
Mr. Bryan was introduced by Presi-
det Marion L. Burton, who declared
him "one of the world's greatest or-
ators." The audience was large, and
after recalling his first address here
28 years ago, the speaker called the
audience "unusually large."
The famous Bryan smile was pres-
ent as the orator stepped upon the
platform, and he appeared at his best
when discussing political subjects
such as an association for world
peace. The address contained humor
at times, and the audience enjoyed
Mr. Bryan's observation, "I have sense
enough not to make a democratic
speech, and further it would be
cruelty for people to have. to pay to
hear a democratic speech."
After outlining the story of the 10
lepers, Mr. Bryan made the applica-
tion to citizens, describing three priv-
ileges: Education, religion and popu-
lar government.
In treating of education he empha-
sized that it is a gift rather than an
accomplishment. "We do not go to
school; we're sent and the ideals that
later lead us to complete our educa-
tion come from those about us," he
stated. He then pointed out the in-
difference of those who receive edu-
cation, showing a lack of sense of ob-
ligation or a desire to repay the debt
they owe society.
"This country never fell so low as
when it stooped to make a treaty of
peace a party issue," said Mr. Bryan
when he referred to the past cam-
paign, and he drew applause when he
observed that it didn't make any dif-
ference to him exactly what kind of
league or association it was, so long
as it prevented war.
In regard to popular government,
he described our governmental meth-
ods, and emphasized the value to us
of the rights and liberties which nre-
ceding generations have given us. He
stressed the need of vigilance and
alertness in the discerning of abuses
and the correcting of them. In the
course of the address, Mr. Bryan il-
lustrated his theme by reference to
the four constitutional amendments
adopted in the past 10 years, and
closed with an appeal to "bless our
own land and through it the world."
Mr. Bryan's address was the first
on the program of the Oratorical as-
sociation. The "Commoner," while in
Ann Arbor, is the guest of Prof.
Thomas C. Trueblood, a former col-
lege mate at Illinois college, Jackson-
ville, I11.

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED
All men who care to take pie-
tures for the Mhiganensian,
call Avery, phone 2220, or leave
names, addresses, and phone
numbers at office in Press build-
ing. Post card size kodak most {
desirable, although others will
do.

EVERYBODY

OUT!

Voicing enthusiastic loyalty with thundkring cbeers, thou-,
sands crowded around tht Ann Arbor station Thursday afternoon
in the mammoth send off we gave the team as it left for' Columbus.
The Yostmen were backed by theastudent body to a man and they.
deserved every bit of support that was given.
On the field at Columbus, although the scene of Thursday was
an event of the past, the men of the Maize and Blue still remem-
bered the departure and were urged on to greater effort by recall-
ing the seething mass of supporters that roared its encourage-
ment.
We gave the team a Michigan Send-off. Are we going to let
its sincerity suffer from a flabby welcome to a homecoming Michi-
gan team? The test of Michigan spirit put forth in the right kind
of reception to the team with the Michigan fight is twice as severe
as the one put forth Thursday. Let's make the answer twice as
decisive. ° When they come into Ann Arbor at 8:30 this morning'
let's see eevry man and woman enrolled at Michigan down at the
station!

BRYAN TO SPEAK
AT NOON TODAY
William Jennings Bryan will deliv-
er an address to students of the Uni-
versity and townspeople at 12 o'clock
today in Hill auditorium.
At the conclusion of his lecture last
night, Mr. Bryan accepted the invita-
tion of President Marion L. Burton and
others to speak today. His accept-
ance was made on the spur of the mo-
ment, and he made no definite choice
of a subject. However, it is expect-
ed that his address will be of a re-
ligious character.
The meeting today will be free, and
as has been the case whenever he ap-
peared before an Ann Arbor audience,
a capacity attendance is anticipated.
It was Mr. Bryan's original inten-
tion to leave for the east after deliver-
ing his address last night, and as soon
as it was learned that he would re-
main in Ann Arbor today, he was ask-
ed to speak again.
Ii
CAOVER WILL SING AT.
TUESDAY'S MUSICLE

VARSITY 'HOLDS BUCKEYES 7 TO07
IN FIRST HALF BUT BREAKS UNDBHTRIICSRI gE R.I G

DETROIT ALUMNI
SMKRSUCCESS
Crowd of 600 Attends Pep Meeting
and Hears Returns of the
0. S. U.-Mich. Game
SIMILAR GATHERING FOR THE
MINNESOTA GAME PLANNED
If mental telepathy could be made
possible, the 600 men who filled the
Chamber of Commerce hall in Detroit
yesterday afternoon, would have won
the game for Michigan.
Alumni and undergraduates held a
pep meeting that despite the unfav-
orable score was so satisfactory that
plans are being discussed for a like
smoker to be held during the Min-
nesota game. Each play was shown
in detail on a miniature gridiron, re-
ports being received by a special wire
from Columbus.
One minute talks by Michigan alum-
ni, and by Mr. Griffiths, representing
Ohio State, broke up the intervals
when no news came in over the wire.i
Cider, smokes, and food further pro-
vided for the good nature and enthus-
iasm of the "600."
Recent graduates were primarily re-
sponsible for the success of the smok-
er. "Jack" Watkins, '12, Pat O'Dea,
'04, Harry Carey, '20, W. W. Hinshaw,
'20, and Carl Johnson, '20, had charge
of the arranging of the smoker.
M. A C. HARRIERS
DEFEAT MICHIGAN
Lansing, Nov. 6. - Michigan's
cross country team came in second
in the all state race this aternoon.
The harriers from M. A. C. captured
first honors, thus gaining permanent
possession of the cup. The victory
today was the third for the Lansing
squad. The score for the run was
M. A. C., 26; Michigan, 31.
The Aggies' men finished 1, 2, b,
6, 12. For Michigan, Frebona came in
third, Whittemore fourth, Penberthy
seventh, Standish eighth, Brannon
ninth, and Douglas eleventh. The
time was 14 minutes 24 seconds.
Michigan's soccer team defeated the
Aggie squad one goal to nothing. For
the Varsity, G. Dyason was the indi-
vidual star. He scored the winning
goal. VanReeman saved a penalty
kick.
Advisory Board Entertains Cabinet
As guests of the Advisory board,
the entire cabinet of the University
Y. W. C. A. motored to Cavanaugh
Lake, leaving Newberry hall at 11
o'clock yesterday morning. Mrs. Lou-
is Karpinski and Mrs. Harry Bacher,
who have summer homes at the lake,
entertained at dinner. , Boat rides
were a feature of the day.

fiadame Fokina
Is deal Artist
(By E. V.)
With gestures more expressive
than speech itself Madame-Vera Fo-
kina gave the impression during an
interview just before the performance
at the Whitney theater last night,

BASSO TO BE ACCOMPANIED
LA FORGE, A COMPOSER
OF NOTE

BY

that she was too ull f Ioer art to
talk at that time. Although madame Charles Carver, who sings next
speaks no languages other than Tuesday evening in Hill auditorium
French and Russian she said through atscthe second concert of the Matinee
one of her interpreters that she Musicale series, while not yet 24
could think of nothing but her even- years of age, has been very favor-
ing's dancing, ably received by New York critics. He
She ays htheliwas trained under Frank La Forge,
She says that she likes our coun- who is to assist him on the program,
try and is fond of appearing before and shows the influence of La Forge,
American audiences. Beginning to according to a well known critic, by
study at the age of nine she has been his slmpliicty of manner, and the free
able to reach her present stage of production of his tone.
perfection in many different types of La Forge, besides being one of the
dancing, which is unusual among most skillful American accompanists,
most modern dancers and with her raiks among the best song composers
master, Michel Fokine, she has stud- in the country, and many of his com-
led the national dances of many positions have been dedicated to, and
countries. The folk-dances she learn- sung by the leading artists of the
ed from the Bohemians during a tour day.
through the land. Included in the pro .am are "Ri-
In her dances Madame Fokina per- dente la Calma" by Mozart, "The
sonifies grace itself in every move- Kiss" by Beethoven, Hendel's "0 Sleep,
ment, while both on and off the stage Why Dost Thou Leave Me," Bishop's
she impresses one with a certain "Love Has Eyes," La Forge's "Ro-
charm of sincerity and sympathy mance," "Des Pas des Sabots" by Sap-
which proves that she really feels the paran, "Chainson du Tambouriner,"
inspiration of her dances, not only the two Mexican folk songs, and "A Heart
happy mood of the Columbine, whom Mislaid," which was dedicated to
she portrays. but also the grave trag- Carver by La Forge.
edy of the "Dying Swan." Other selections to be given are
Richard Straus' "Dream at Twi-
SINK CHOSEN AS light," "0 Thou My Sacred Land" by
STATE SENATOR Hugo Wolf, Loewe's "Maidens Are
Like the Wind," Gretchmaninow's
"Over the Steppe," "Thy Warning Is
Charles A. Sink, head of the Univer- Good" by Grieg, MacDowell's "Etude
sity School of Music, has again been de Concert," "La Procession" by Cae-
chosen state senatnr from this sen- sar Franck, "Algir le Soir" by Four-
atorial district. &r. Sink graduated drain, and "Before the Crucifix" and
"A Heart Mislaid" by La Forge.
from the University of Michigan in"AHatild"bLFog
1904 and soon after receiving his di- WIDOW OF FORMER GEOLOGY
ploma was appointed business man- PROFESSOR WINCHELL DIES
ager of the School of Music.
Succeeding in everything that he Word was received in Ann Arbor
undertook and working for the inter- yesterday of the death of Mrs. Win-
ests of his state, he has come to be ad- chell, widow of the late Prof. Alex-
mired by all who know him. He has ander Winchell, who formerly held
served on different educational boards the chair of Geology in the University.
throughout th'e state and also was an The older residents will remember
active member of the Red Cross and the octagon house which stood on the
the war board. While in the state site of the Hill auditorium and which
legislature he was appointed to the was the home of Dr. and Mrs. Win-
committee on education and there se- chell.
cured for himself an enviable record Mrs. Winchell is survived by two
as a straight-forward business man. daughters, Mrs. Jennie Sylvester of
Oakland, California, and Mrs. Horace
ANN ARBOR HIGH ELIMINATES V. Winchell of Minneapolis, with
PONTIAC IN SCHOLASTIC RACE whom she made her home.
The remains will arrive in Ann Ar-
Ann Arbor High School took a hard bor at 2:45 o'clock Monday afternoon.
fought game from Pontiac High yes- Interment will be made in the For-
y est Hill cemetery, Rev. A. V. Stalker
terday afternoon by a score of 14 tofficiating.

7. Pontiac up to yesterday was still
one of the contenders for the state,
scholastic title but now must give up
its claims. For the local team, the
playing of Gregory and Crippen was
particularly good, both of these men
scoring a touchdown. Pontiac's score
was made by Boardman.

University of Indiana Professor Here
With prospective changes in view
for his own university, Dr. J. O.
Ritchie, profesosr of internal med-
icine at the University of Indiana, was
in Ann Arbor Thursday inspecting the
Medical school and the hospital.

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