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November 05, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-05

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGIT WIRE
SERVICE

and MINNESOTA Too

_

VOL. XXXI. No. 28. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

PR ESI DENT-ELECT
GIVEN GREATEST
VOTE' I'N HISTORY

I ,:

Varsity, Aided By A. A. Ry., Finally BAN0 NiirNOT
Reach Toledo After Exciting Trip' UlpIU

DEMOCRATIC

STRONGHOLDS

OFI

OKLA., TENN. AND MO.
GO REPUBLICAN

G. O. P. HAS MAJORITY
OF SCORE IN SENATE
Of 34 Upper House Contests the
Victors Captured 9 from
the Defeated
(By Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 4. - A record
smashing electorate vote for Senator
Harding, topping the 400 mark, and
Republican majorities of more than a
score in the senate and 150 in the
house were assured from practically
complete returns tonight from Tues-
day's election.
Parts of South Go Republian
With the Democratic strongholds of
Oklahoma, Missouri and Tennessee
definitely swept to therRepublicans'
ranks by the party's crushing vic-
tory, the Harding-Coolidge ticket had
396 votes, exclusive of the 5 from
Montana, where the Republican's
state ticket was victorious and the
presidential ticket ahead. The Re-
publican landslide tonight has given
them 58 senate votes as against 37
for the Democrats, with the late re-
turns failing to determine the- seat
of Senator Beckham, Democrat of
Kentucky.
Democrats Lose in Senate
Of the 34 senate contests, the Re-
publicans captured 9 from the Demo-
crats and elected'all 15 of their can-
didates. Among the Democratic sen-
ators who today went down to defeat
were Senators Chamberlain of Ore-
gon, former chairman of the military
committee; Senator Smith of Ari-
zona, who lost to former Republican
Ralph Cameron; and Senator Hender-
son, Nevada, who was defeated by
former Governor Goody.
Final returns from a few congres-
sional districts were belated tonight;
some due to close races which upset
a few previous announcements and
others from isolated sections. With
these missing districts the Republican
roll in the senate had climbed past
285 to 135 for the Democrats.
(Continued on page Eight)
FAONHAM TO TELL OF T. H
President Burton Declares Same Talk
Well Received at Minnesota
Charles W. Farnham, attorney of
St. Paul, Minn., will lecture at 4
o'clock this afternoon in Hill auditor-
ium on "Theodore -Roosevelt," at the
personal request of President Marion
L. Burton. There will be no admis-
sion charged.
Last spring Mr. Farnham spoke to
the students of the University of Min-
nesota on Roosevelt and elicited
warm admiration from the students
and faculty for his knowledge of the
intimate life of Roosevelt. His talk
was declared by President Burton to
be the finest given there during the
three years he spent as president of
Minnesota.
The President has urged attendance
at the lecture by the students.
4 DENT, MEDIC ELECTIONS
Dent elections will be held
from 10 to 12 o'clock this morn-
ing in the Dental college.
Medic elections will be held
from 9 to 12 o'clock this morn-
ing in the Medical college.

(Special to The Daily)
Toledo, Nov. 4, 7:30 o'clock -
Viichigan's Varsity arrived here in
;reat spirits this evening. Yes, they
were looking forward to some real
iotel food at the Secor. But that
wasn't the only thing that made them'
"eel on the crest, so to speak. The
old send-off hadn't been forgotten by
i long shot.
No sooner had the train etarted
than Eddie Usher and Jack Perrin
began wishing it would hurry up. You
gee Eddie lives in Toledo and Jack
has heard about it. Coach Yost and
Frank Steketee, on the other hand,
found the slow easy dog-trot which
the engine had assumed very much
to their liking and regretted that the
pleasant journey must end so quickly.
Duke Wants to Walk
Duke Dunne was all for getting off
at the first stop and walking the rest
'f the way, claiming that he wanted
to be in Columbus by Saturday. Gob
Wilson, though commending Duke for
his fine spirit, took the other side of
the argument in which he was sup-
ported by Ernie Vick. These two
rterling linemen vetoed Duke's propo-
sition on the grounds that it would
be a shame to make the engine feel
badly.
Captain Goetz sustained a slight in-
4ury enroute, but it is not expected
that it will keep himout of the game.
The Michigan leader was biting his
aails vociferously when one of the
rails ended with disastrous results to
the captain's upper lip. Jim Johns
rushed to Goetz' rescue, however,
and, by dexterous use of a safety pin,
managed to stop the bleeding. The
fact that the captain can neither talk
nor eat now is a slight drawback.
Jack Goes Half Fare (Almost)
The conductor was all for letting
Tack Dunn go through on a half fart
but Jack felt insulted and offered to
lick him. Needless to say the con-
ductor conceded the point. A little
later Nelson thought he would warm
'ip a -little and so started blocking in
the aisle, but no sooner had he be-
-un than the engine gave up alto-
gether, wailing that it could not hope

t

to buck up against the Michigan full-
back.
Help! Mich. A. A. Loses Quarter!
Just before the train dragged into
the city on the Maumee, Coach Dou-
glas dropped a quarter under the
seat. The commotion was consider-
able, but above the groans of wrest-
ling humanity was heard the voice of
Yost commanding his men to stop
fighting and let the coin go.
Douglas was then seen to lean over
and whisper in Yost's ear, whereupon
the Michigan mentor sang out in his
mdst compelling tones, "Get-after it,
boys! Don't give up if it takes all
night." You see that quarter belonged
to the Athletic association.
I Goebel Comes in Handy
After arriving in Toledo the team
was conveyed to .the Secor in a street
car. Paul Goebel made himself use-
ful by reaching out the window and
putting on the trolley a couple of
times.
Soldier Virtuoso Employs Every Op.
portunity for Complete Self
Expression
PROGRAM MARKS OPENING
OF EXTRA CONCERT SERIES
(By D. F. 3.)
In a program of exceptional inter-
est, Lieut. Albert Spalding, noted
American violinist, the first artist to
appear in the Extra Concert series,
played to a large audience Thursday
night in Hill auditorium.
Beginning with "Sonata in D" by
Corelli, perfectly rendered, and end-
ing with Sarsate's familiar "Car-
men" Fantasy, Lieutenant Spalding
held the entire approbation of the
audience throughout the evening.
Among the most noteworthy of the
numbers were the adagio and Fugue
from Bach's "Sonate in G minor,"
played without piano accompaniment.
The violinist took every advantage of
the opportunity for complete self-ex-
pression and admirably fulfilled the
necessity for pure technique which
such an attempt entails.
The richness of tone and intelligent
appreciation exhibited in the "Con-
certo in D minor," by Wieniawsky,
was so well received that an encore
followed, while a Brahms' waltz had
to be repeated.
Technically, Lieutenant Spalding is
amply equipped, but it is his person-
ality, his fine musical feeling, and the
variety of expression as shown in this
program which especially recommend
his playing.
Andre Benoist at the piano added
much to the artistry of the violin-

COMMITTEE

CHAIRMAN

PROPER MANNER

TICKET SALES STILL TOO
SMALL
FIVE FEATURE ACTS-
SECURED FOR PROGRAM
Personnel of Band as it Will Make
Columbus Trip Decided
Upon
"The Band Bounce is not being
properly supported. Ticket sales are
far below what they should be at this
time." That is the statement made
yesterday by H. B. Lindsay, '21, chair-
man of the Band Bounce committee.
Must Fill All Seats
"It is necessary," said Lindsay, "to
sell every seat in the house if we ex-
pect to send the band to Ohio State.
At least $1,500 is required to make the
trip. The committee in charge of the
program has made a special effort to
secure interesting numbers for the en-
tertainment, and it seems to me that
they have been successful"
The band will start off the program
and will be followed by five feature
acts. The first entitled "Xylophonits,"
will be staged by Donald Rhodes, '21,
and Maurice Wood, '23. The next act.
will consist of "Impersonations," by
someone whose identity will be kept
secret until this evening. Knight Mir-'
rielees, '21E, aided at the piano by
George Roderick, '21E, will stage a
regular "Al Jolson" performance as
the third number. The "Varsity Quar-
tet" will sing some old college songs,
and the fifth number will be "Tommy
Thomas' Octette." As a closing num-
ber the "Professional Trio" playing
the piano, banjo, and xylophone will
render "Whispering."
Tickets on Sale Today
Ticket tables will be located at var-
ious places about the campus today.
Selections have been made of the
men who are to be sent with the band
on its trip to Ohio State Saturday.
These men will also appear on the
Band Bounce program. The men nam-
ed below have been chosen for these
events, and are listed together with
the instruments they will play.
Trombones: N. W. Eddy, Grad.,
Harold C. Seeley, '21E, J. D. Mille1
'23M, J. D. Brown, '21E, Cec Rhodes,
'21E, W. T. Ferguson, '23E, Wm.
Paynter, '22E, H. L. Packer, '23, and
Ed. Wishroppe, '22M. Baritones: A.
Heald, '23, J. E. Bacon, '24M, J. B.
Fuller, Grad. Basses: Allmann, '23,
W. J. Schank, '21E, A. R. Wagner,
'21E. Altos: Perry Mason, '21, John
Sanders, '23M, G. E. Korten, '22E, W.
C. Ellet, '21M, A. F. Heyl, '23M, C. E.
phones: E. T. Griffs, G. F. Green,
'24M, C. A. DeWitt, N. P. McNaughton,
'21E, C. K. Madden, '23D, I. D. Lum-
by, '22E, J. E. Williams, '22E.
Eleven Cornets
Cornets: F. B. Thomas, '22, M. K.
Davis, '22L, C. J Cole, '23, W. P.
Lyons, '22E, G. V. Harrison, E. M.
Beresford, '22, E. M. Apple, '22L, B.
F. Zinn, '23, N. C. Roegner, '22E, J.
N. Towne, '21E, H. W. Jackman, '23E,
Drums: K. P. Jones, '23M, D. E.
Rhodes, '21, E. F. Bacon, '22E, W. C.
Kruger, '23M, F. M. Burns, '21E.
Cymbal: H. Herman, '21. Long-
drum: F. H. Pearce. Clarinets: H.
S. Sherman, '21E, Geo. Collins, Grad.,
C. E. Arther, '21E, R. A. Cowles, L.
Stutz, '23D, R. D. Horn, '22, E. H.
Beernink, '21M, E. L. Overholt, Grad.,
G. E.- Bachman, '23E, W. O. Kling-
man, '23M, F. E. Jacobs, '21, W. E
Comb, '23E, A. C. Beam, '23. Oboe:
W. H. Seeley. Piccolo: D. M. Teal,
'21D, G. J. Higgins. Drum major: E.
A. Osus, '21M.

SAYS

Vulcans Take 12
Senior Engineers
Twelve men entered Vulcans sen-
ior engineering honorary society, yes-
terday afternoon accompanied by the
rings from clanging anvils.
he initiates were: M. E. McGow-
an, R. . Fischer, C. 0. Wilson, F. R.
Storrer, R. B. Marshall, C. N. Johns-
ton, A. C. Bennett, E. M. Stevens, W.
R. Harrison, D. A. Longendecker, D. B.
Stratton, and R. H. Shirk.
A banquet was held at the Union
following the initiation. R. F. Grindley
acted as toastmaster. C. G. Wetzel
welcomed the new men, Prof. J. C.
Parker spoke for the faculty, M. E
McGowan answered for the initiates.
and Roy Elliot spoke under the title
of annealing.
PB PRESENT BRYAN
Great Commoner Who Will Speak
Here Saturday Was Classmate
of Professor Trueblood
TO BE OPENING NUBER OF
1920-21 LECTURE COURSE
President Marion L. Burton will in-
troduce William Jennings Bryan in
the first lecture of the Oratorical as-
sociation lecture course to be given
at 8 o'clock Saturday evening. Be-
fore the lecture the great orator will
be the guest of honor at =a dinner
given at the Union, which 'President
Burton, Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood,
and other members of the faculty will
attend._
Mr. Bryan will be a guest of Pro-
fessor Trueblood while in Ann Arbor.
The two are old college classmates,
and both took private work under the
same professor, who was at that time
the best teacher of oratory in the
West. Mr. Bryan is an alumnus of
Illinois college at Jacksonville, Illi-
nois. Professor Trueblood was at that
time a special student at the college.
The association announces that
there are still some season tickets on
sale at the bookstores, while single
lecture tickets may be obtained at the
box office in Hill auditorium after 7
o'clock Saturday evening.
'ENS/AN SALES TOTA
HAULF OF sum HOPE
With the sales campaign of the 1921
Michiganensian drawing to a close
tonight, subscriptions- thus far re-
ceived amount only to $1,499. This is
approximately half of the sum
of $3,000 set as the objective for the
drive.
Campaign managers, in order to
clear up a. wrong impression which
has spread about the campus, state
that today is the last opportunity for
entering subscriptions to the 'Ensian.
All applications must be handed in
before this evening, when, with the
close of the drive, no more orders wil
be accepted.
"FI Fl" PLEASES
Campus Stars at Best i n Musical
Fantasy Given for Charity
"Fi-Fi," the home talent production
presented under the auspices of the

Kings daughters of the Congregational
church at the Whitney theater last
night, received the unstinted applause
of a house that was filled to capacity.
Mrs. Potter, Mrs. Hunt, and Kemp
Kenna, '20, played their important
parts with a thoroughness. The danc-
ing of Mlle. Kruska was particularly
pleasing.
THE WEATHER
Generally Fair; Colder

MICIIIG AN
LEAVES

THOU.SANDS GIVE
VARSITY SEND Off
FOR 0. 5. U. TIL

FOOTBALL
YESTERDAY

COLUMBUS
BAND LEADS SNAKE-
DANCE TO STATION
Crowd Is Largest That Ever Wit.
nessed Departure of a Maize
and Blue Team
With the Varsity band playing the
Victors and 3,500 students cheer-
ing, the 1920 Maize and Blue football
team left Ann Arbor for Columbus and
the Ohio State game at 4:50 o'clock
Thursday.
Record Crowd Present to Cheer
The largest crowd that has ever
witnessed the departure of a Micht-
gan team-gathered at Hill auditorium
and, four abreast, followed the band,.
the football team in automobiles, and
the Varsity cheerleader, Al Cuthbert
to the Ann Arbor railroad station,.
where the coaches, trainer, and mem-
bers of the squad, numbering in alt
35 persons, took the special car re-
served for the trip to the Buckeye
campus.
s Collection Successful
Before the start from the auditor 2
mum the band marched around the.
,ampus, and a collection was taken to.
send the cheerleader to the game,,
The members of the sophomore engf-
neering class contributed $21.40, and
one fraternity offered to give more
than enough to send a cheerleader
urovided that sufficient money was-
not raised by popular subscription..
The Student council secured a gen-
erous contribution consisting of sums
'.mounting totapproximately $130,.
which made a total of $150.
This makes it possible to send be-
sides the cheerleader eight more
freshmen than had.. been expected.
-ould be provided for through the re-
turns from the various fraternities.
Students Snake Dance
The long line of Michigan support-
ers snake danced down Huron street
to Main, and then to the Ann Arbor
station, where the enormous crowd
swarmed over the platform, box cars,
and baggage trucks.tWith Cuthbert
leading yells from the roof of the
station, the crowd cheered the team,.
Coach Yost, and the individual mem-
bers.
Le Grand A. Gaines, Jr., '21E, pres
ident of the Student council, Donala
J. Porter, '21, chairman ofthe pro-
cession, and R. W. Christie, '22D, n
charge of contributions, stated last
night that thanks are due the 4u-
dents whose generous contributions
made possible the sending of the
cheerleader and eight more of the
freshman squad, making a total of
26, to Ohio State.
MEDICS WILLVOTE TODAY~
Juniors, Sophomores, and Freshmen
to Ballot in Medic Building
Classes in the Medical school will
elect officers today. The freshmen,
sophomores, and juniors will vote in
the medical building from 9 to 12
o'clock in the morning, the seniors
will vote in the afternoon at the ho-
pital.
Senior nominees are as follows:
president, D. W. Durbin, O. H. En-
sing; vice-president, Mary Baker;
secretary, W. P. Cook, W. G. Cowan;
treasurer, A. W. Coarey, John Hef-
rick-
The juniors will vote on the fol-
lowing names: president, Angus
Goetz, H. J. Smith; vice-president, W.
(Continued on Page Eight)

SQUAD
FOR

DETROIT ALUMNI GUESTS
OF TELEPHONE COMPANY
I;EACH, CRUSE TO RUN SCORE.
BOARD AT 0. S. U. GAME
SMOKER
Detroit alumni were guests of the
Michigan State Telephone company
at a luncheon given Thursday noon
in the offices of the telephone com-
pany. Judge F. Kuhn, '93, '94L, who
is president of the company, was in-
troduced as the principal speaker by
Pat O'Dea, who declared that he was

"the best judge the supreme court hadist'swork.
ever had.'
Judge Kuhn told of the efforts be-
ig made by the telephone company to
improve the service. FOR OHIO SPECIAL
"Jack" Watkins explained that plans
have been perfected for the smoker
to be held Saturday afternoon, begin- Only 250 tickets for the trip to Co-
ning at 2:30 o'clock. Arrangements lumbus on the Union's special train
are completed for play by play bullet- had been taken at a late hour last
ins of the Ohio State game, which will night. Because of the poor response'
be supplemented by a graphic repre- to the plea for early, reservations the
sentation on a miniature gridiron to Union has decided to accept applica-
be operated by "Waffle" Peach, and tions for train tickets until 5 o'clock
"Bill" Cruse. tonight. It is thought by the com-
It is the hope of the alumni that a mittee in charge of the special train
large number of the undergraduates that the men who have already signed
who are unable to attend the Ohio up for the trip represent only a small
game in person will avail themselves portion of the students who intend to
of the invitation extended and "smoke make the journey on this train.
up" with the alumni pn Saturday. Tickets will be sold between 9 and
But few tickets had been sold last 12 o'clock in the morning and be-
night for the special car to Detroit tween 2 and 5 o'clock in the after-
that the Union has scheduled for the noon today. Special arrangement
alumni smoker tomorrow. The booth have been made with the Ann Arbor
in the Union lobby will be open today railroad to accommodate about 125
to accommodate late signers. more men than have already signed.

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