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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1920 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DETROIT
APHRODITE
Company of 304. 8 Big Scenes

A R R I c
DETROI
America's Foremost Singing, Comedienne
NOR A BAVES -"HER FAMILY TREE"
Famous Musical Play by Al Weeks and Seymour Simons
Theatrical Treat of the Year

How did the disciples start? A ser-
'mon by F. P.Arthur tonight at Church
of Christ. South University.-Adv.
For results advertise in The Mich-
igan Daily.-Adv.

d

s

THREE DAYS STARTING TODAY

rim
BE

lT E lm L L

ANN ARBOR REDCRS
PREPARES FOR' DRIVE
"EVERY HOUSE 100 PER CENT,"
SLOGAN FOR COMING CAM-
PAIGN
"Every house 100 per cent and every
person a member," is the slogan of the
Ann Arbor branch of the American
Red Cross in the coming drive for
members and funds. The "Roll Call,"
as it is called, is an annual event, in-
augurated during the war and is the
fourth of its kind to be launched. The
national campaign is to begin on Arm-
istice day, Nov. 11, and is to be corny-
pleted by Nov. 25, but so enthusiastic
is the local chapter over its prospects
that they expect to finish their cam-
paign within three days after the
start.
Is Not War Organization
The Red Cross is desirous of im-
pressing the fact that it is not a war
time organization. At present their
work is divided into two branches: the
home service and the nursing service.
The home service branch is doing
everything within its power to aid ex-
service men and their families. They:
afford them vocational training, give
them medical attention when neces-
sary, settle up their i surance dif-
ficulties, lend them money until their
own pay for service can be secured
from the government, and other in-
valuable service.4
The nursing service sends nurses to
the homes of Ann Arbor families who
are too poor to afford trained nurses.
This department has gust completed
a medical examination of all the child-
ren in the country schools about Ann
Arbor. Besides these services, the

Red Cross is ready for any disastrous
emergency such as a large fire.
Still Doing Service
"We are not a war time organiza-
tion," said Margaret R. Reynolds, sec
retary of the home service. "Our ser.
vices to the community were not com-
pleted with the end of the war."
Any ex-service men who wish to aid
the chapter in the coming membershipt
roll call are asked to phone 2751 to
the Red Cross secretary from 4 to- 6
o'clock any afternoon.
WHOLE CONSIGNMENT OF OHIO
TICKETS PRACTICALLY SOLD
More than 2,350 tickets for the O.
S. U. game at Columbus Saturday, have
been sold from the offIce of the Ath-
letic association to Michigan alumni
and students. This figure represents
practically the whole of a consign-
ment of tickets sent from the Ohio
State university athletic association to
the association for sale here.
While in 1918 and years previous to
that date 4 large number of seats for
the Ohio game have been taken by
Michigan supporters, the present high
prices and recent advance in railroad
fare, may be considered as sufficient
reason for the drop in attendance.

Students Luui
409 Jefferson
High Class To

Open 6 a.m. Close _1
F EtraC c

Series

IN,
"TheEYriceof
Redunption"
HERE YOU ARE!

AT THE THEATERS
TODAY

Screen

THE O

S. U. GAME SATUDRAY

Will be shown play by play on the Majestic Theatre stage with a replica of a gridiron, moving
football and a huge scoreboard. The play will be shown just as it happens at Columbus. Us-
ual show runs until gime starts. No raise in prices.

Its full of pep
from start to
finish

al
usa c

A STORY AND
AN ACTRESS
THATILL
INTEREST

j

Majestic- Bert Lytell in "The
Price of Redemption." Pathe
News and Paramount Mag-
azine.
Arcade-Katherine McDonald in
"Curtain," and a comedy, "The,
Window Trmimer."
Wuerthl - Eugene O'Brien in
"The Wonderful Chance." Kin-
ograms and a Hall Room Boys
comedy.
Orpleunm-Eva Novak in "Want-
ed at Headquarters." Also
Jack Dempsey in "Daredevil
Jack" and a comedy.
THIS WEEK
Stage[
Whtney-Today and tomorrow,
"Fi-Fi of the Toy Shop" underE
the auspices of King's Daugh-
ters of the Congregational
church with Helen Knowlson
and Kemp Keena, '21.
Saturday - Micheil and Vera
Fokina, Russian ballet danc-
ers.
Sunday-Fritzi Scheff, the fam-
ous musical comedy star, in
the musical comedy, "Glori-
anna."
Garrick (Detroit)-Nora Bayes
playing in that Weeks-Simons
musical play, "Her Family
Tree."
Shubert (Detroit)- "Aphrodite"
the Comstock-Morris produc-
tion which was the sensation
of the season in Paris, New
York, and Chicago.
University Men! Start a Savings
Account with HURON VALLEY BLDG.
& SAVINGS ASSO. Your money will
double in 10 years. Never paid less
than 6 per cent dividends since in-
corporation 30 years ago. Can draw
your money any time and receive 5
per cent from date of investment.
Money in association not taxable.
Under State control. Wm. L. Walz,
Pres. H. H. Herbst, Secy., A. A. Sav-
ings Bank Bldg.-Adv.

JANUARY 10
THE

FLONZALEY QUA

HILL AUDITORIUM
NOVEMBER 4.
ALBERT SPALDING
Violinist
ANDRE BENOIST, Accompanist
America's finest violinist who gal
up his art during 'the war and W(
great distinction as a Lieutenant
the Aviation Corps.
NOVEMBER 13
UNITED STATES
MARINE BAN:
WILLIAM H. SANTELMAN, Lead
ARTHUR S. WHITCOMB,
Cornet Soloist
This organization, famous for
century and a quarter, has played
every presidential inaugural sin
that of Thomas Jefferson. For: t
first time in nearly a decade it h
been permitted to leave Washingt
for- a brief tdur, Ann Arbor, throu
the co-operation of the Chamber
Commerce, being one of the few mus
centers to be visited.
DECEMBER 2
PERCY GRAINGER
Pianist
Mr. Grainger is recognized as o
of the world's greatest artists. He
also famous as a composer and co
ductor.

;k\

/10
s --
Kat
The.

3

47i'aeo

I tiff
S . " ft
. 't ije
'*y4 "

ADOLFO BETTI, First Violin
ALFRED POCHON, Second Violin
LOUIS BAILLY, Viola
IWAN D'ARCHAMBEAU, 'Cello
The most. perfect string quarte
ever assembled.
FEBRUARY 28
NEW YORK
CHAMBER MUSIC
SOCIETY
CAROLYN BEEBE, Director and
Pianist
ANDRE TOURRET, First Violin
IHERBERT CORDUAN, Second Vio
SAMUEL LIFSCHEY, Viola
JACQUES RENARD, Violoncello
LUDWIG MANOLY, Double Bass
WILLIAM KINCAID, Flute
GUSTAVE LANGENUS, Clarinet
HENRI DE BUSSCHER, Oboe
1UGO SAVOLINA, Bassoon
JOSEF FRANZEL, French Horn
I LAWRENCE WHITCOMB,
English Horn

TICKETS FOR THE COURSI
$2.00 - $2.50
SINGLE CONCERTS: $1.00, 75c,

See

Brine McDonald
American Beauty
IN
Her Greatest

Cold: Wave Coming
"The Weather Man Says So"
/LOOK AT US

You will
never
forget it

AIN"

You can't
forget it

Al. St. John Tropical Nights
"The Window Trimmer" BRAY PICTO
FRIDAY - SATURDAY

Rain Coats--- Brown and Black Leat-
hers---Sheep lined and Fur Colla-
red Coats. We can show you a
real line of Gordon Coats-
J. KARL MALCOLM
604 EAST LIBERTY STREET

I_

Returns of the Michigan-Columbus Game will be given out at Saturday Matinee '

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