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November 02, 1920 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAIL

Volume I TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1920. Number 2

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' '

Jaw- School Lectures on Investments:
Hon. Dallas Boudeman, a member of the Kalamazoo bar and a close
student of practical finance, taxation, and kindred subjects, will begin a
course of 10 lectures on Investments, Monday, Nov. 15, at 4 o'clock, in Room
C in the Law building. These lectures are open to students of all depart-
ments and are designed to be rather in the way of practical suggestion than
of theoretical study. The lecturer will give suggestions as to how invest-
ments should be made and dangers to be avoided, and will describe and dis-
cuss the various forms of investment securities.
The lectures will be given on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
. and Friday, until the series has been completed.
Mr. Boudeman will also begin a course of lectures on Michigan Statute
Law, particularly for the benefit of law students, on Monday, Nov. 15, at 5
p. m., in Room C. This course is also open to all who may care to follow it.
HENRY M. BATES.
Mcdicad t "sdents:t
PFroessors Depage, Bordet, Sand and Dustin of the University of Brus-
sels will talk to the medical students Tuesday morning at 9 a. m. in the am-
phitheatre of the medical building. All medical students are requested to
attend these talks and will be excused from their usual duties during that
time.
VICTOR C. VAUGHN, Dean.
Meeting of the American Association of University Professors:
There will be a meeting of the local branch of the Anerican Association
of University Professors on Wednesday evening, Nov. 3, at 7:30; Room 304,
at the Union, for the purpose of electing officers, of reorganization, and at-
tending to any other business which may be brought before the meeting.
H. P. THIEME, Secretary.
Junior Engineers:
The first assembly of the year will be held in Room 348, Engineer build.
ing, at 10 a. m., Tuesday, Nov. 2. A. H. LOVELL, Mentor.
To Rletorie Students:
Section X of my students in course 3 will meet Mr. Peterson in Room F'
314 N. 8. Thursday at 9 o'clock. T. E. RANKIN.
Electrical Engineering 2A:
Lecture at 10 o'clock Tuesday, Nov. 2, will be given in Room 411, Engi-
neering building, instead of Room -348 as usual, on account of Junior E.n-
gineers' Assembly. The 1 o'clock section will meet at the usual time and
place. H. H. HIGBIE.
Drawing 4,
Section 9 at 10 o'clock Tuesday, Nov. 2, will meet in Room 445, Engi-
neering building, instead of Room 4l1 as usual, on account of the Junior En-
gineers' Assembly which had to be postponed from last Tuesday.
H. HI HIGBIE.
Excursion to Selfrige Aviation Field:
Members of the Aeronautical Society, Aero Students, and others inter-
ested are invited to visit Selfrige field Nov. 6, 1920. Those desiring to go will
register at the New Engineering building, Room 341, before the evening of
Nov. 4, 1920. F. W. PAWLOWSKI.

TUESDAY
10:00-First Junior Assembly of the
year in room 348, Engineering
building. A large attendance is de-
sired.
3:30-Soccer practice on South Ferry
field for all interested.
6 :00-Board ofdUnion Governors din-
ner, room 133, Union.
6:30--Bible class in the study of the'
gospel of St. John, Upper room,
Lane hall.
7 :00-Sophomore tryouts for basket-
ball manger report at Waterman
gym.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal, School
of Music.
7:00-Orchestra rehearsal, assembly
hall, Union.
7:15-U. S. Marine club meets, room
325, Union.
:15 - tInterfraternity conference
meeting, room 318, Union.
7:15-Sphinx meet, room 302, Union,
7 :15-Friars meet, room 306, Union.
7 :30-Meeting of howe club at the

SERICE FELLO UI PU
(Continued from Page One)
though the candidate may choose
whatever branch of study he prefers,
it is planned to grant fellowships for
advanced study in the particular field
in which he has already proven him-
self proficient.
Numerous Choices
French universities which success-
ful applicants may select as their
choice 'for study are Aix-Marseille,
Alger, Besancon, Bordeaux, Caen,
Clermont-Ferrand, Dijon, Grenoble,
Lille, Lyon, Montpellier, Nancy, Poit-
iers, Rennes, Strasbourg, and Tou-
1ouse.
In 1921, the fellowships, not exceed-
ing 25 in number, will be awarded.
They will have a value of $200 plus
10,000 francs, are tenable for one year,
and if circumstances warrant, may be
renewed for another year upon appli-
'ation. Payments will be made in
avance in threeninstallments per
year: A first payment of $200 in June
of each year, and second and third
installments of 5,000 francs each, pay-
able in Paris on the following Sept.
1 and Feb. 1.
To be eligible, applicants for fellow-
ships must be citizens of the United

ion."
"I have always had faith in the
rooad judgment and patriotism of the
American people," said the governor,
"and an analysis of the past tells us
that in all our history wherever a
moral issue has been presented it has
met with the approval of the Amer-
ican electorate. If there ever was a
campaign based entirely on a great
moral issue this is the campaign, be-
cause the thing to be decided is:
'Whether the civilization of the world

shall tie itself together in a c
certed purpose to prevent the trag
ies of war'"
Hopes for Good News
"I hope we will have good news
morrow night. When I say good ne
I do not speak of a Democratic
tory. I speak for a victory for hu
anity which will be a victory 1
humanity world wide, having a sig
ficance that touches every man, wc
an and child in the civilized nati
of the earth."

H I EY HEATRE
SU7NDAY, NOVEMBER 7

T HE W ORLD'S

GR EATEST

MUSICAL

COMEDY

STAR

Union.
7:30 - Round-up smoker,
room.second floor. Union.

r'eading

7:30}-Kentucky club meets, room 319. State, between 20 and 30 years of age

Central League Debating Squad:
The first elimination tryouts for th
Saturday morning, Nov. 6, at 8 o'clock
will appear in the order in which the n
rom 304 Mason hall at the time the try
of either the affirmative or the negativ
in with each speech. The speech itse
the brief, and proof of this point shoul
will be limited to six minutes.
*Nottice:
I wish to urge the co-operation of
the next few months to avoid a possi
The setting of the clock one hour 1
.: oneour generators, which are alreadyr
All men planning to enter the field
attend a meeting in Room 302 of the M
7:30. Purpose of the meeting is to co
cational club..
ART EXHIBITION
OPENS TOMORROW
Charles H. Woodbury's collection of
paintings will be shown at 8 o'clock
Wednesday evening in Alumni Mem-
orial hall to members and prospective
members of the Ann Arbor Art asso-
ciation. The exhibition will open to
the general public at 2 o'clock Thurs-
day afteronon.
Mr. Bruce M. Donaldson, of the fine
arts .department, will give a gallery
talk to members'and prospective mem-
bers the first evening which will be
"varnishing" night. Two gallery talks
a week will be given by some member
of the fne arts faculty throughout the
exhibit which will continue until Nov.
12. There will be one each Sunday
afternoon and the other sometime dur-
ing the week.
Prof. Hugo P. Thieme has just re-
ceived aletter from the director o
the Detroit Art museum congratulat-
ing him on securing the collection for
Ann Arbor and stating that it was one
of the best and most popular exhibits
ever shown in Detroit. Professor
Thieme says that that the pictures are
all hung; the seascapes typefy differ-
ent moods cause a marvelous reaction
on the observer. The exhibition room
wll be open from 2 to 5 o'clock every,
afternoon.,
UNION ANNOUNCES NINE NEW
CO)J[ETTEE APPOINTMENTS
_ (continued from Page One)
'24M, assistant chairman; Arthur
* Davis, 'n.E; George 11. Korten, '21E;

he Central League Teams will be held
in room 302 Mason hall. Candidates
names are placed on the blackboard in
-out starts. Consult this list. A brief
e side of the question must be handed
lf should deal with only one point in
d be as complete as possible. Speeches
RAY K. IMMEL,
Intercollegiate Contest Director.
everyone to conserve light and power
ble shutdown of our lighting plant.
back throws a heavy additional load
running 50 per cent overload.
E. C. PARDON, Superintendent.
rd of public school work, are urged to
Michigan Union Wednesday, Nov. 3, at
nsider the formation of a Men's Edu-
J. B. EDMONSON,
Department of Education.
Wilson P. Lyons, '22E; Leonard F.
Meilander, '22E; C. Eugene Perry,
'23; Cecil C. Rhodes, '21E; William
Schanck, '21E; William Seeley, '22E;
Herbert M. Shaw, '22E; Francis B.
Thomas, '22; W. M. Webster, '23.
Bowling committee: Kershaw
Harms, '21E, chairman.
Billiard committee: William Ing-
ham, '21, chairman; Buckley Rob-
bins, '23.
S'choo lDays Ho l
New A ttractions
The old, old problem of, "How to
keep Willie in school," seems to have
been solved at last. At least the stu-
dents of the Tappan grammar school
have not the least desire to stay away
from school. In fact they are very
ranxious to go every morning.
Thereason? Lunch is being served
at 10 o'clock every morning at that
institution.
Mrs. Harry N. Cole, wife of Prof. H.
N. Cole, has discovered, by experi-
menting, that she can increase the
efficiency of the pupils by serving
them a half pint of milk every morn-
ing. Dr. J. H. Herdman, city physician,
has recommended that a graham waf-
er be added to the lunch.
While the idea is new in Ann Ar-
bor, it has met with success in many
other large cities. Many mothers
commended Mrs. Cole for her work
and it is expected that. the practice
will spread to other schools of the
district.

Union.
7:30-Underclass conduct committee
meets, room 323, Union. .
7:30-Erie club meets, room 304.
Union.
7:30 - Aer2autical ~ society meets,
room 302, Union.
8:00-Junior Research club meets.
room F, 426, Natural Science build-
ing.
WEDNESDAY
3:30-Soccer practice on South Fer-
ry field.
6:30-S. A. II. dinner, room 319.
7:15 - Inter-collegiate Zionist socie-
ty meets, Lane hall.
7:15 - Veterans of Foreign Wars
meet, room 318, Union.
7:15--Western club mixer, audito-
rium, Lane hall. All men and
women from west invited. Musical
program has been secured..
7:15-Student council meets, room
306, Union.
7:30-Educational club meets, room
302, Union.
7:30-Am. Association of University
Professors meets, room 306, Union.
U-NOTICES
At the meeting of the Cooley club
Tuesday Professor Shartel of tht
Law faculty will speak on subjects
of interest to all law students.
The following men will report for
Glee club tryout, at 5:30 Tuesday,
room 206, School of Music: Wm.
Ellit, Thomas E. Dewey, F. H.
McPike, H. P. Wagner, C. E. But-
ler, B. G. Booth, H. G. Whitcomb,
N. H. Swenson, E. M. Stevens, and
L. M. Turner.
Due to conflict with Saturday's game.
Greater Newark club of New Jer-
sey will meet at 7:30 p. in. Wednes-
day in the Union. Room number
will be posted on bulletin board.
Sophi lit football practiee which was
to have been held at Ferry field
this afternoon has been called off in
accordance with Intramural rul-
ings.
CORRECTION
Wm. Jennings Bryan will lecture at
8 o'clock, Saturday, Nov. 6, in Hill
audtiorium instead of Nov. 1. as stated'
in the "What's Going On" column of
Sunday's issue of The Daily.

and graduates of a college requiring
our years, or a professional school
requiring three years of study for a
jegree. . If not qualified in either wR
they must be 24 years of age and must
have spent five years in an industrial
establishment requiring technical
skill. Candidates must also present
testimonials to good moral character,
personality anrd intellectual ability,
and must have a practical ability to
use French books.
Application Requirements
Application blanks, which can be
procured at the New York office, 522
Fifth avenue, should be filed with the
secretary, Dr. I. Ia. Kanriel, at the
same address. Applications must be
accompanied by certificates of birth
and naturalization, record of college
studies or industrial work, and a sign-
ed photograph taken within a year.
In addition, all written or printed
articles and books written or pub-
lished by the applicant, must be sent
to the secretary.
The advisory board of the organiza-
tion is composed of 77 men, the ma-
jority of whom are at present mem-
bers of the faculties of the larger
American universities. Prof. Raymond
Weeks, of Columbia university, is
oresident. Prof. Louis F. Hall, of the
College of Dental Surgery, and Asso-
ciate Prof. Charles B. Vibbert of the
philosophy department, are the two
University of Michigan representatives
on the board.
IIARDINIG AND COX OPTIMISTIC
AS ELECTION RESILT LOOMS
(Continued from Page One)
issue, declaring that the Republican
candidate was "wiggling and wob-
bling;" and that the senator's elec-
tion meant "controversy and confus-

IN
THE MUSICAL SUCCESS OF ALL AMERICA
Book by Catherine Chisholm Cushing
Music by Rudolf Friml, Composer of "The Firefly"
ONE HUNDRED FIFTY NIGHTS IN NEW YORK
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Star in Musical Comedy
TH E GREAT BROADWAY CAST
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AND ENTIRE NEW YORK PRODUCTION INTACT
Prices: Gallery-75c; Balcony-$1.00, $1.50, $2.00;
Lower Floor-$2.50
MAIL ORDERS NOW
SALE OPENS FRIDAY, 10 A. M.

C: ymnaS I U fl Complete outfit Includin
S o t h i n shirt, pants, supporte
Cltig and9shoes $4.25

WAHR'

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BOOKSTOR ES

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-U

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S r o emSENLAD ISSION $1.00

per 6

This Is the First Number of the
Oratorical Association Lecture Course
Ten Lectures Season Tickets $2.50 and $3.00
At Wahr's & Graham's

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