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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1920 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I I IIIIVILi
OHIO BATTLE

Yost Working with His Men on Ways
to Break Up Ohio's Strong
Aerial Attack
SECRET PRACTICE TO BE IN Ol-
DER THIROUGHOUT THE WEEK
Ferry field gates were closed to the
curious as well as to the patriotiG
Monday afternoon, when the Varsity
wasgiven the first plays that will be
used against Ohio State on Saturday.
Secret practice will be the rule all
week, witha possible let up Wednes-
4day.
Coach. Yost returned from Chicago
impressed with the powerful State
aerial attack, by means of which the
Buckeyes pulled the Chicago game
out of the lost column. As this same
thing happened against Wisconsin,
opponents of the Columbus eleven
would do well to watch the passes
until the last moment. Ohio defeated
Chicago with Stinchcomb playing
only three quarters; which shows the
strength of the-Buckeyes.'
Workman Fills Harley's Shoes
In Harry Workman, Ohio has a
man who, for individual playing, is
now the center of attention in the
West. He has assumed that place
which critics had assigned to Stinch-
comb, .the filling of Chic Harley's
shoes. 'I'he passing combination of
tie two Workman brothers made pos-
sible 24 completed passes in the
Wisconsin game, and half that num-
ber in the contest with the Maroons.
Michigan backs ae now being drill-
ed in breaking up passes after they
reach the line of scrimmage, and it is
to this phase of the game that Yost
will devote attention .this week. As
well as having the backs break up
passes, Yost is teaching his linemen
to break through the opposing for-
wards, and block the pass before it
reaches the scrimmage line. In this
Vway the Michigan line will aid the
backs in that the pass will have to be
hurried, and will not be as effective.
Lights and Ghost Ball Used
For the first time this year, the
ghost ball a'nd the are lights were
used to complete the practice sesson.
On account of the change in'time, the
field is dark 'a full hour earlier than
usual, and to get in the necessary
dril each evening, the lights and the
whitewashed ball will be, called into
service. ,
Micigan came through the Tulane
game in good condition, none of the
men being injured. Wieman is still
out of the game, and will not be back
for the Ohio contest. Steketee ran
through. signals with the Varsity
Monday night, as his knee gives him
little trouble now. Vick was not
out, and Johns played the pivot posi-
tion. Cappon, who was called be-
hind the line in the Tulane game for
several plays, will probably be given
a chance in the backfield this week,
although a permanent switch is not'
likely, as the Holland boy has shown
too good stuff at the end position to
be moved, this season at least. .
SOCCER MEN MEET
M. A. C. SATURDAY
On Saturday of this week the Var-
sity" soccer team will play M. A. C. at
Lansing. The fact fthat Steve Far-
rell's cross country men are also go-
ing to be there offers a double attrac-
tion for the farmer student body. M.
A. C. has no football game schedul-
ed for this day so will have' the sup-
port of the entire school. It is hoped
that this contest will become an an-
nual affair.

Last fall Michigan's soccer team
played industrial teams of Detroit,
winning four out of five games. This
year it is hoped that a collegiate
schedule may be arranged so that
soccer may be made a minor sport.
Illinois has organized a soccer team
this year for the first time. Other
conference teams are considering or-
ganizing varsity soccer teams. At
Ohio State, soccer is already a strong
intramural sport and it is believen
that they would readily fall in line if
it were made a conference sport.
All further candidates for the var-
sity team are requested to meet at'

Ferry field at 3:30 .,p. m. this after-
noon. At that time first steps will be
made towards the selection of a
team. Freshmen are not eligible to
try out for this team. An All-Fresh
squad is to be selected at the same
time and will battle the varsity ox
Thursday afternoon as final practice'
for the M. A. C. game.
DISCONTINUE FOOTBALL
AS INTURAMURAL SPORT
LACK OF NECESSARY TRAINING
AND EQUIPMENT LEADS
TO ACTION
Interclass and interfraternty foot-
ball will be liscontinued in the fu-
ture. This was the decision reached
Monday afternoon at a conference be-
tween L. A. Gaines, president of the
Student council, and E. D. Mitchell,
director of intramural athletis.
Lack Training and Equipment
Director Mitchell has never been
firmly convinced" as to the advisabil-
ity of football as an intramural game,
due to the fact that the players-ca
not be properly equipped and trained.
Accidents have always been frequent
and this fall some of the injuries have
been serious in nature. However, the
game has been so popular that it has
kept a place on the 'intramural pro-
gram until the present, when the stu-
dents themselves have seen the dan-
ger of continuing play.
Although the intramural depart-
ment wishes to encourage as many as
possible to participate In other games
where recreation can be secured with
but little necessary equipment and
preparation, it is acting in accord
with the sentimet of the Student
council, that football is a sport which
should be limited to the number of
teams tha~t can be fuly equippd and
carefully coached and trained.
Soccer to Be Introduced
I Soccer is to be introduced as an ex-
veriment and will be continued in the
"uture if it proves popular with the
student boy. Soccer is soon to be
made a minor sport in the University
and games will be scheduled with
outside schools. These interclas and
fraternity contests, will be a good
means of developing prospects.
ELECT NEW CROSS
COUNTRY CAPTAIN
R. C. Brannan, '21, has been elected
captain of Michigan's cross country
team. The squad has returned from
ts disastrous trip to Purdue and de-
spite the Boilermaker's overwhelm-
ing victory they are far from disheart-
ened.
The next #ill and dale race will take
place at Lansing next Saturday when
the state cross country title will be
decided. The men are looking for-
ward to a possible victory over M. A.
C. which will bring the state trophy
permanently to Michigan.
On theother and, should the
'Farmers emerge on the top of th pile,
they will carry off the cup, for it goes
to the school which is first to win it
three times. The Wolverines and Ag-
gies have both copped first honors
twice. There is a chance, however, for
one of the smaller colleges in the state
to win, and should that be the re-
sult, final possession of the trophy
will remain undecided, for another
year.
PHYSICAL EXAM REPORTS NOW
SENT TO PARENTS OF FRESHMEN

Instituting a custom new to the
Univeristy, Health service authorities
are now mailing to parents of fresh-
men reports of medical and physical
examinations.
s After the examination, - which is
compulsory for both men and women,
is completed, a detailed report is com-
piled, and after careful consideration,
this together with a letter of sugges-
tions by which the patient might im-'
prove is sent to the parents.
Answers to many of the letters al-
ready received indicate that the par-
ents appreciate these suggestions of
the Health service.ยข
We write insurance of all kinds:
Fire, tornado, automobile, tourist,
loater bonds. POTTER & ALLS-
gOUSE, 601-4 First e National Bank
Bldg. Phone 2072.-Adv.

.
Chicago Drops to Third Place After
Defeat by Ohio; Indiana Has
Equal Claim
MICHIGAN-0HIO, CHICAGO.
ILLINOIS NEXT SATURDAY

CONFERENCE STANDING
Won Lost
Illinois ..............3 0
Ohio .................2 0
Chicago ...........2 1
Indiana.........2 1
Wisconsin..........1 1
Iowa ...............1. 2
Northwestern .........1 2
Michigan .............0 1
Purdue ..............0'2
Minnesota - ............0 3

Per-
cent
1.000
1.000
.666
.066
.500
.333
.333,
.000
.000
.000

Saturday's games in the Big Ten
left Ohio State and Illinois still unde-
feated and in a tie for first place, and
showed that the contest for Confer-
ence honors is likely to be settled at
Urbana, Nov. 20, when these, two
elevens clash.
Chicago by losing to Ohio by a point
was dropped to third place, which In-
diana is contesting through a hard
earned victory over Northwestern, 10
to 7. Frequent use of passes mark-
ed this game a gruelling battle, from
which the favorite emerged victorious.
Minnesota Shows Improvement
While the outcome of the Ohio-Chi-
cago and Illinois-Minnesota games
was as looked for, the scores were
closer than expected. The Buckeyes
won from Chicago because the Mar-
oons failed to kick goal. Nevertheless
the Ohioans deserved the victory, al-
though Chicago was more successful
in solving the State offense than seem-
ed possible.
Coach Williams is bringing his
eleven into form, which means a fierce
battle" for Michigan, Nov. 20. A de-
cided comeback was evidenced by the
Gophers, and their bitter fight held
Illinois 17 to 7, in a game which was
expected to be decisively for Illinois.
By next Saturday, Minnesota will have
an eleven, which ought to worry Wis-
consin.
Other Teams Prepare
Wisconsin and Iowa rested in pre-
paration for games next week with
Minnesota and Northwestern respect-
ively, and Purdue had a hard game
with Wabash, which it won 19 to 14.
Michigan's contest with Tulane was
an easy victory, although the south-
erners put up a great scrap, and at
times showed the Wolverines that they
took the outcome too much for grant-
ed.
As the season develops, it becomes
more and more probable that none of
the Conference teams will go through
the season undefeated, in which event
no school will have an undisputed
claim for the title. With powerful
elevens representing almost every un-
iversity in the Big Ten, the games are
all contested bitterly, and last quart-
Ia r

er .victories and frequent upsets are
to be expected.
Ohio State and Illinois seem to be
the strongest in the race as their per-
fect record indicates, but Michigan
or Illinois may trim the Buckeyes,
while the Illini may be downed by
either Wisconsin, Chicago, or Ohio.
Freshmen Flock
To Gymnasium
Freshman gymnasium classes start-
ed yesterday in Waterman gymna-
sium with an enrollment of 1,553
men, one of the largest; registrations
in the history of the department of
physical education. Of this number
943 are lits, 5,66 engineers, and 44
architects.
Because of this enrollment it has
been necessary to divide the men into
seven classes. These classes will be
held as follows: Monday and Friday
at 3:15, 4:15, 5:15 o'clock; Tuesday
and Thursday at the same hours;
Wednesday at 3:15 o'clock and Friday
at 4:15. The men have been evenly
divided at the various hours so that
each class will contain about 250
freshman.
There are still a few freshman lits
that have failed to classify; they must
do so at once or will be marked ab-
sent.
RED CROSS AIDS
+EX-SERVICE MEN
During the month of October the
home service section of the American
Red Cross, Washtenaw county chap-
ter, has given aid in some form to 50
ex-service men or their families.
Nine men were aide in filing their
claims for compensation for disabil-
ities received while inthe service. Two
men were enabled to get their Fed-
eral 'Board of Vocational Education
grants changed, which means that in
addition to their tuition and supplies,
they will receive $100 each month
from the government.
One man needed at home for the
support of his dependent parents was
enabled to obtain his discharge from
the Navy. Two men in the Naval re-
serve force received 'back retainer
pay.
The Blue Front
Cigar Store
STUDENT OWNED
Corner of State and Packard

a compensation of $8 the Red Cross
succeeded in having it changed to $80
per month.
Nine Federal board students were
given loans to enable them to stay in
school until their first government
checks ewre received.
The Red Cross office is located in
the Cornwall building, corner of Hu-
ron street and Fourth avenue.
Paronize Daily Advertiers.-Adv.

N

For one man

who had been given

*W *
aad1 two bst
FOOTWEAR OF
QUALITY AND
DISTINCTION

They Are
Pair And
Year.

More By The
Less By The

AleIx"

Latest advice from the Ann Ar
railroad officials places the price
the round trip to the Michigan-I
State game at $14.78; former st
ments set the price at $13.50, but
failed to include the war tax
$1.28. Men may purchase trip t
ets on Tuesday and Wednesday/ti
10 to 12 and 3 to 5 o'clock in the
by of the Union. Women may
their tickets at Barbour gymnas
on the same days.

Atfrbi 3f. ruby. lac.nr

Chicago - Madison - Ann Arbor - Detroit

t

GYMNASIUM,

OPENS

MONDAY,

NOV.

1

.. ..

Set Your Syni Supplies Ti

..S

"SPORT SHOP"
7ON J. Moe
711 N. UniversityAve. Next to Arcade Theatr

"-Makes Jack a Dull Boy!"
Jack and Tom and Harry get
to be very dull chaps, indeed, if
they believe in all work and no
play.
Men who want to keep their
minds keen and their wits
sharp, know that they must play
to keep fit for the terrific strain
of modern life.
If your "prof" is wise he will.
heartily approve of your play-
ing an occasional game of bil-
liards. Come in tonight-get a
good cue in your hands again-
and see how soon your former
skill comes back to you.
HUSTON BROS.
Pocket and Carom Billiards.
Soft Drinks and Light Lunches.
Cigars and Candles, Cigarettes
and Pipes.
"We Try to Treat You Right"

We are zealous in maintaining
the QUALITY of
OurFactory at Ann Arbor is One of
4 w
the Finest in the State
and it is equipped with every modern appliance
to insure uniformity of product
ASK FOR IT A T YOUR FA VORITE FOUNTAIN

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11

Varsity

Band

111

Concert

Hill Auditorium, Friday, Novm.5, at 8 P. M.
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50c-Tickets aWahr'Graham's,

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