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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
AND COOLER
TrijDAY

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ASSOCIAT]
PRESS
PAY AND IHT
SERVICE

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XXXl No. 2 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1920 PRICE THREE C]

TANLEY TO QUIT
AT ENDOF YEAR
ETIRE3IENT WILL END THIRTY-
TWO YEARS OF ACTIVE SER-
VICE IN ANN ARBOR
RESPONSIBLE FOR
SUCCESS OF MUSIC HERE
ime Here at Request of Late Pre ..
Angell After Brilliant Period
Of Study Abroad
Dr. Albert A. Stanley, director of
e Univeristy School of Music, has
inounced that the present school
ar will terminate his active partici-
tion in the administrative affairs of
nn Arbor musical activities. This
cision by Dr. Stanley will end a

DR. A. A. STANLEY
eriod of 32 years' association with
he development of musical culture in
he University and Ann Arbor.
Came at Angell's Request
The late Pres. James B. Angell in-
uced Dr. Stanley to join with the
Iniversity in 1888, when the latter, af-
er a brilliant career as a young man,
iad spent several years in Europe in
tudy under leading masters and had
.lready won an enviable position
mong musicians of that time. Through
is influence, the musical activities
f Ann Arbor and the University were
aerged into one central organization,
he University Musical society, whose
'urpose was to conduct a school of
nusic, an orchestra, and a chorus for
he presentation of the more import-
'nt choral works in connection with a.
eries of artist concerts.
A firm believer in the fact that-the
tudy of music should be supplement-
A with the hearing of the best music,
)r. Stanley was immediately inspired
o the establishment of several series
f concerts. In 1893 this course was
.bandoned for the May Festival, which
mmediately became an annual event.
Dr. Stanley's painstaking care in
he selection of the artists for these
oncerts has been instrumental in
naking these concerts celebrated
hroughout the country.
Starts Extra Series
To provide larger facilities for the
nusic lovers of Michigan, an extra
oncert series of five numbers was an-
ounced last year. In the Choral Un-
on series six numbers will be pro-
ided, in which artists of international
epute will appear. The extra concert
eries calls for five programs. The
aculty concert series will be enrich-
d by the en agement of out of town
rtists, and a dozen programs devoted
o solo and ensemble music will be
ffered. The May Festival is looked
orward to as the crowning success
, Dr Stanley's career

FIRST ESTIMATES
BELIEVED CORRECT
Although new students still contin-
ue to enroll in the University, the in-
crease yesterday was not great
enough to permit the forming of a
more accurate estimate of the ulti-
mate total than that already given
out, according to Registrar Arthur
G. Hall.
Basing his judgment on the num-
ber already enrolled early yesterday
afternoon Dr. Hall stated that he did
not believe the Monday enrollment of
5,600 in the literary college would be
increased by more than 150 or 200
students by yesterdays influx. There
was nothing phenomenal about yes-
terday's increase, he said, it being
about the same as at this time in
former years.
From these facts he said it would
be impossible to form any new total
estimate and that as nearly as could
be figured, the number finally reach-
ed, including the Summer session,
would probably be in the neighbor-
hood of 10,500.
TURNERWITES ON
IRISH QUESTION
Article By History Professor Appears
In October Issue of World's
Work Magazine
BELIEVES SENTIMENT HERE
CAUSED BY PROPAGANDA
"The Sinn Fein and the United
States," a six page -discussion of the
attempts in the United States during
the last 12 months to free Ireland, is
the subject of an article written by
Prof. Edward R. Turner of the his-
tory department which appears in the
October number of "The World's
Work."
Professor Turner believes -that war
between the United States and Eng-
land over the Irish question is almost
inconceivable and that there Is small
possibility of war if the Irish propa-
gandists are to be no more effective
than they have been.
Campaign Conducted
According to Professor Turner, a
vigorous campaign of propaganda has
been conducted in this country to
arouse Americans to take the side of
the Irish against the English.
"Too emotional to be reasonable,
too excited to be charitable, too prej-
udiced to inspire confidence or re-
spect," is Professor Turner's charac-
terization of the Irish-American press.
Big Parties Refuse Appeals
The great political conventions last
summer gave the propagandists and
Irish workers a cold shoulder, ac-
cording to Professor Turner, but he
says they did succeed in getting in-
serted a plank in'the platform of the
party recently organized by the Com-
mittee of Forty-Eight, a declaration
about Ireland which exactly suited
De Valera.
This is the first of two articles
written on this question by Professor
Turner. The other will appear in the
November issue of "The World's
work."
FRATERNITY ROBBERIES WORK
OF PROFESSIONAL THIEVES
Robberies of the Psi Omega fraterl
ity, 1007 East Huron street, and the

Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity, 1003 East
Huron street, are believed by the po-
lice to be the work of professional
thieves and not that of students, as
was first suspected.
Both fraternity houses were entered
shortly before midnight and were ran-
sacked systematically. Several watch-
es and chains, and $100 in cash were
stolen. The police declare that they
have no clues which will lead to an
immediate arrest.

PRICE OF Rooms
CUT A THIRD IN
LSTFEW DYS5
OVER-SUPPLY BRINGS ABOUT RE-
DUCTION IN SCALE OF
RENTS
DROP C AUSED BY INFLUX
OF "GET RICH QUICKS"
Reputed Iligh Prices Bring Many Out
of Town People Here to Take
Share of Profits
Further drop in the prices of rooms,
together with an increase in the num-
ber of rooms available, was reported
yesterday by the Union housing com-
mittee.
It is estimated by committee officials
that there has been a general reduc-
tion of at least 30 per cent in room
prices in the past three days. This
radical cut has been precipitated by
those landladies who made extensive
preparations for housing students
only to find that their rooms could not
be rented at exhorbitant prices.
Many Come for Profits
The reputed large profits in the
room renting business have brought a
number of people to Ann Arbor with
"get rich quick" intentions. These new
landladies have been forced to cut
their prices or face an entire loss on
their investments. The whold market
has been affected by this action, and
indications now point to the estab-
lishment of prices nearer those of a
few years ago.
The Union committee has endeavor-
ed to educate the students to accept
rooms a little farther from the cam-
pus, and this has ended the "corner"
maintained by the centrally located
rooming houses, according to Emerson
Swart, '22E, committee chairman.
Accommodations Provided
In order to prevent any student
from hastily accepting a high priced
room because a few days search did
not discover a moderately priced one.
the University has provided sleeping
accommodations for 65 men at Hal
house, corner of Volland and Wash-
tenaw streets. Thirty-five cets h
charged for one night's lotrg. ,
MEETING UNITES
SMALLER HOUSES
The first of a series of attempts to
unite the women of the smaller. Uni-
versity houses took place Monday ev-
ening in the parlors of Barbour gym-
nasium when 300 University women
met in an informal manner to get
acquainted with each other.
Marguerite Chapin, '20, assistant to
the dean of women, introduced Mrs.
Marion L. Burton and Dean Myra B.
Jordan who gave short talks. The
Chinese women of the University put
on a comedy skit in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, and Irene Rosenberg, '21,
played the piano for the singing of
the Michigan songs.
Theeparty was assembled by a com-
mittee appointed by Miss Chapin,
which called at the league houses to
meet the girls and invite them. Oth-
er affairs of a similar nature are
planned.
"A large majority of the University

women live in the smaller houses,
which are widely scattered, geograph-
ically speaking," said Miss Chapin.
"These women have great potential-
ity for leadership and influence
among all the women of the Univer-
sity, and it is the hope of the com-
mittee, recently organized, to draw
these scattered houses together to the
end that the women who live in these
houses may come to realize their
strength and develop their possibili-
ties for leadership."

BURTON TO ADDRESS
ADVISERS TONIGHT
Upperclass advisers to whom Union
Pres. Paul W. Eaton wrote this sum-
mer, will meet in the second floof
reading- room of the Union 'at 7:15
o'clock tonight. These men are re-
quested to attend the meeting wheth-
er they have seen Chairman Albert
Jacobs or not.
President Burton will be present
and will deliver a message of signific-
Once to this group of men. His talk
will begin sharply at 7:15 o'clock and
for this reason all are earnestly re-
quested to be there at. that time.
CLEVELAND WINS
FIRST OF SERIES,
Indians Exhibit Perfect Team Play
and Individual Starring; Day
Cold and Windy
COVELESKIE- SHOWS MASTERLY
PITCHING THROUGHOUT GA1E1
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 6.-The Cleveland
American ball club decisively defeated
the Brooklyn Nationals in the initial
game of the 1920 world series this aft-
ernoon.
The victory, which was far more im-
pressive than the -score would appear
to indicate that it was won by per -
feet team play, sparkling with bril-
liant individual work on the part of
the Indians, who made the efforts of
the Superbas dull by comparison.
Gate Receipts Large
The opening contest was witnessed
by 23,573 persons. The gate receipts
were announced as $79,049.00. I
The game was played under condi-
tions far from being ideal for baseball.
A stiff north wind blew out of a cold
grey sky, and the temperature was
reminiscent of football rather than
America's great summer sport.
Both the team and individual play-
ing of the winner was superior to that
of Brooklyn.. Coveleskie pitched a
masterly game and held the opposing
batters in check throughout the con-
test. He was backed by perfect field-
ing of both infield and outfield.
Speaker Stars
Manager Speaker in center field
prved a barier beyond which it was
ahl opt imcssible to drive the ball.
Catcher O'Neil with his two timely
r;ecring doubles was the star bats-
n:apn for the victors.
BURTON MEETS '22 MEN
AT SECOND RECEPTION
SAYS JUNIORS SHOULD BE IN
POSITION TO THINK FOR
THEMSELVES

TRYOUTS FOR VARIOUS
AC'klVITIES WANTED
icibiganenslan
The editorial staff of the 1921
Itichiganensian will-neet at 4
o'clock this afternoon-at the of-
fices- in the Press building. Staff
tryouts will also come at this
time. Good photographers are
particularly wanted and should
bring specimens of their work.
Chimes
All sophomore men wishing to
try out for the editorial depart-
ment of the Chimes are request-
ed to report between 4 and 6
o'clock in the afternoon to the
managing editor, Lester E. Wat-
erbury, '21L.
Athletic Program
Tryouts for the Athletic Pro-
gram should apply at the offices
in the Press building from 3 to
5 o'clock in the afternoon any

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,
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;,
1
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.

day this,-wgeek.
WILL HOLDUNFER E
GOLF MEETAT CHICAG
TOURNAMENT -WILL BE PLAYED
ON OLYMPIAN FIELD
COURSE
The first Conference golf tourna-
ment, which was postponed from last
fall due to lack of interest is to be
held Oct. 22 and 23 at the Olympian
Fields golf course in Chicago. Near-
ly all Confrence schools are planning
to send teams to this meet. Chicago,
Illinois, Wisconsin, Purdue, Indiana,
and Michigan, have already signified
their intention of so doing, and North-
western and Ohio State are also ex-
pected to send representatves.
The teams, which will consist of
two men each, will play a 72 hole
match against bogey, both men play-
ing each day. The man turning in
the lowest score will be awarded the
individual trophy, while the two men
having the lowest total will be the
Conference champions.
The tryouts for the Michigan team
will be held at the Ann Arbor golf
course the week of Oct. 11. As the
tournament will be governed by Con-
ference rulings no freshman will be
am7tiwe + n t c mo ill

SEVERAL COLLEGE PRESIDENTS
SCHEDULED FQR
SPEECHES
HUTCHINS WILL GIVE
HISTORICAL ADDRESS
Admnimistrative Problems and Con.
struct ive Measures to be Dis-
cussed Friday
Appearing on the program of tho
coming inauguration of Pres. Marion
L. Burton are many names of national
reputation in educational work, and
the presidents of several universities
are scheduled for addresses some time
during the three-day event. -
The inaugural session is set for
10:30 o'clock, Thursday, Oct. 14, in
Hill auditorium, to be preceded by th.e
academic procession at 9:30 o'clock.
President-emeritus Hutchins heads
the program with the historical ad-
dress,' followed by the introductian
of the President by the Hon. Victor M.
Gore, regent of the University.
Burton's Address Third
President Burton's inaugural ad-
dress is third on the program. For
the subject of his address he has takY
en "The Functions of the State Uni-
versity." Two other speakers are also
scheduled for the morning session,
which develops more strongly into the
educational phase of the gathering; and
deals with the functions of g'overning
boards and the faculty in the admin-
istration of a university.
The aftei'noon session ,concerns ed-
ucational readjustments, and is - fol-
lowed by a reception for delegates
guests, and members of the faculty:at
8:30 o'clock in Alumni Memorial hall.
Friday's .sessions will be taken up;
with administrative problems and
constructive measures. At 7:30 o'clocl
that evening at the Union a banquet
will he tendered to- delegates, invited
guests, and members- of the faculty
of professorial rank. Pros. A. Law
rence Lowell, Harvard university am
other guests will speak.
- Regents to Meet
The morning of Saturday, Oct. 16
will be given over to a meeting of th
regents of state universities witi
addresses and discussion of problem;
confronting the governing boards :o
universities. A luncheon at 12:3
o'clock at the Union for the variou
regents will conclude the sessions.
TO USE NEW PLAN
IN FILLING JOBS

MEN OF NATIONAL REPUTATION IN
EDUCATIONAL WORK ON PROGRAgM FO;
PRESIDENT BURTON'S INAUGURATIl

"Being a junior implies setting up
in business for oneself," declared
President Marion L. Burton to the
class of 1922 at the second"informal
reception held last night in the Union
Assembly hall. President Burton em-
phasized the fact that when the first
two years of a man's college course
are completed, he is in a position to
question everything that is told him,
not merely to accept what is handed
down but to think for himself.
Paul Eaton, '21, president of the
Union, introduced the new head of the
Universty after seeral hundred jun-
iors had filed by to shake his hand.
President Burton 7ill address the
male members of tho senior class of
every department of the University at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the Assembly
hall of the Union. "Every senior in
the University is u'┬░pected to be pres-
ent to hear the message that the pres-
ident has for him," stated Harry C.
Willson, '22L, chairman of the Union
reception cor'mittee.
The sophon:.-)re classt will be pre-
sented to the president at a similar
meeting Thui :day night in the Union.

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allowed to compete. T en men wil
be chosen from those making the Reorganization of the "Y" empl
course in 42 or better. However, if ment bureau for this year is plann
ten players do not succeed in making so that the students and empl9y
this score the number of strokes for will receive better treatment. (
eligible men will be raised to 45. cials plan to list a small number
Any one wanting to try out should students, who are williig to do. h
give his name either to Professor work at odd jobs. Fifty cents
Adams, Professor Trueblood, or Pro- hour will be paid for work of 1
fessor Wenley, the first two of whom kind, which will be abundant eno
are the sponsors of the meet, or hand to keep all- applicants busy.
in his name at the intramural offices. In previous years it has been fo-
Records of scores made, either at the by the city people that many stude
home course or local club, should be loafed on the jab and did not do th
turned in when the candidates pre- work satisfactorily., To preven
sent themselves, repetition of - this, the "Y" plans
get report. on all the workers.
ANN ARBOR WILL GO BACK men doing good work will be ca
TO CENTRAL TIME ON OCT. 31 upon again, and placed in line for
easier and better paying 'jobs n
It has been announced that 2 o'clock year.
Sunday, Oct. 31 all clocks in the city To effect this organization, the
will be turned back one hour to coin- employment bureau wants all
piy with the day light saving plan in- dents needing work to apply at .L
augurated several yeArs ago. hall and wants the'town people to
This change will not affect the foot jobs there.
ball schedule, as all games, including
thiose played in October, will be play- Ponzi Meets Only a Third of Ca
ed according to Central time. It is ad- Boston, Oct. 5.-Charles Ponzi
vised that thoze'taving friends in oth- paid less than one dollar in three
er cities make this point clear to the claims of creditors of his s
them. -tered scheme of high- finanlce.

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Important Notice
Students must exchange athletic coupon for athletic book before 12 noon
Saturday, October 9th, 1920. Otherwise they will have to p'ay admission
of 50 cents to Case game.
Books can be secured at Waterman Gymnasium, Main Hall and Athletic
Association Offices.

Ushers Wanted for Illinois and Chicago Games
The Athletic Association will pay a fee of $i.oo fer each game to Univer-
sity Students, providing they are able to report at Ferry Field at 4:00 P. M.
Friday, the day previous to the game, and at 12:00 Noon on- the day of,
the game.

Applicants for Ushering appointments call immediately at the Athletic
Offices, Ann Arbor Press Building, to leave Coupons No. 3 and No. 5 with
name, class and address on reverse side of each coupon.

..

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