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October 29, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-29

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I

THE WEATHER
FAIR; RISING TEMPER.
ATURE TODAY

Abp
411
4r Ir t an

~aiti

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 22. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1920. PRICE FIVE C

SALES DRIVE FOR
MICH I SANENSIAN
TOBINMONDAY

Advisors 2egin
Freshmen Visits
"Approximately 20 advisors have

PETTY ELECTED
SENIOR PRSDN

CAMPAIGN
WILL

FOR SUBSCRIBERS
BE WAGED ON
CAMPUS

EDITOR AND MANAGER
APPEAL FOR SUPPORT
Large Circulation Will Enable Staff
to Issue Best Book in Country,
Says Blakeslee
If backed by a sufficient subscrip-
tion among the students, the 1921
Michiganensian will be the most com-
prehensive and elaborate yearbook
ever published by any university ac-
cording to Willis Blakeslee, '21L, and
Boyd H. Logan, '21, managing editor
and business manager, respectively,
of this year's annual. The sales cam-
paign begins Monday morning on the
campus.
Will Increase Space
The editors base their assertion on
the innovations and increased space
which will feature the book. More
room will be devoted to athletics, spe-
cial sections being planned for last
spring's championship baseball team
and the Olympic games.
"Every Conference school, some
with much smaller enrollments, has
heretofore outsold the Michiganen-
sian," said Blakeslee. "There is no
reason why Michigan cannot support
a yearbook as well as they. The
more books sold, the better will the
work be on the volume. It is essen-
tial for every senior to have a book,
and freshmen should start getting a
book and have one every year. Back
your yearbook. It will be a book well
worth having. Every student should
have a copy for every year in col-
lege."
Radical Departure Made
A radical departure from prece-
dent in the 1921 Michiganensian will
be the fact that all art work will be
done by outside professionals, insur-
ing satisfaction in this department of
the book.
FUN{RAL SERVICES.
FOR ALLEN TODAY
Funeral services for the late Prof.
John R. Allen will be held at 2:30
o'clock this afternoon from the Bap-
tist church. Rev. J. M. Wells will
read the service. Prof. H. E. Riggs,
Prof. Emil Lorch, Prof. H. C. Ander-
son, Prof. J. C. Parker, Prof. Q. W.
Patterson and Prof. H. C. Sadler,
close associates of the deceased in a
personal and professional way, will
act as pall bearers. Interment will be
in Forest Hill.
Professor Allen, whose death Tues-
day in the east came as a sudden
shock to his many intimate friends
and associates in Ann Arbor, was
one of the most prominent men on
the engineering faculty here until
he left several years ago to head the
engineering department at Minnesota.
-He left Minnesota last spring to take
up research work in Pittsburg, and
his success in this field is considered
the greatest achieveemnt of his ca-
reer.
Professor Cross to Lecture on Art
Prof. Herbert Cross of the fine arts
department, will give a lecture on
"The Evolution of the Seascope," at
4:15 o'clock Wednesday afternoon,
Nov. 3, in the Natural Science audi-
torium. In this lecture special refer-
ence will be made to the Woodbury
collection of marine paintings which
is to be exhibited beginning Wednes-
day evening at Alumni Memorial hall.

not been notified of their undergrad-
uate charges because of insufficient
addresses," reports Albert C. Jacobs,
'21, chairman of the upperclass advis-
ors committee. He requests that these
men get in touch with with him at
once as the committee wants all ad-
visors to become personally acquaint-
ed with the freshmen assigned to
them before Nov. 1.
The 40 committeemen should com-
municate with the advisors under
them at once, to avoid confusion and
delay in case that sone of the ad-
visors have left school or will be
forced to drop this work for other
reasons.
Cards, to be used in reporting the
progress of the movement, have been
given to the committeemen, and these
should be forwarded to the advisors
some time this week with complete in-
structions as to the method of filling
them out.
UNION CAMIGN
CAPTINS MEET
Ofilcials Explain Plan for Conducting
This Year's Life Membership
Drive
COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN AND
EATON, '21, ADDRESS LEADERS
Officials of the Union's life mem-
bership drive met last night with the
captains of the canvassing teams will
explained to them the plan which will
be used this year in'the campaign.
The meeting was addressed by
Maynard Newton, '22, chairman of
the drive committee, Paul Eaton, '21,
president of the Union, and Richard
Khuen, '21, assistant committee chair-
man.
Team Captains Announced
The team captains are Richard
Bromfield, '22, Reaumer C. Stearns
Jr., '23E, James B. Witker, '23, Law-
rence Snell Jr., '23, J. Douglas Dow,
'22E, Robert F. Wieneke, '22, Bert
Ubele, '23E, Bruce Van Dusen, '22,
Ben W. Winter, '22, Kenneth Rindge,
'22A, Seward S. Cramer, '23, West H.
Gallogly, '22, Byron Darnton, '23,
Donald J. Thorp, '21, David Preston,
'23, Clark Boothby, '22, Maurice
Moule, '23, and A. B. Sharpe, '23.
Each of these captains will have a
team of 10 men, and each team mem-
ber will be given a list of 18 pros-
pective members.
Life membership rates are the
same as last year. The regular fee
is $100, payable in installments of
$20 per year. Students in ;the last
year of residence at the University are
assessed $50, payable in yearly in-
stallments of $10. These latter must
make the initial payment before or
during the last year of residence.
Credit Given
If the first payment is made before
Dec. 1 of the last year of residence,
credit will be given for the yearly fee
paid to the University for that year.
Students not in the last year of res-
idence may begin payments on a life
membership, but no credit will be
given for the Union fee paid to the
University until the final year. Life
members' buttons are given to the ap-
plicant as soon as the first yearly
payment is made.
Union officials did not confirm the
report that the money from the cam-
paign would be used for the comple-
tion of the swimming pool.

Douglas
neers;

FOUR CLASS ELECTIONS
SCHEDULED FOR TODAY
Fred J. Petty defeated his oppo-
nent, Albert C. Jacobs, in the race
for president of the senior literary
class by only a few votes in the class
elections held yesterday morning. Oth-
i er officers of the class determined by
the election are: Alethea Yerkes, vice-
president; Jean Wallace, secretary;
John McManis, treasurer; Lowell
Genebach, football manager.
Douglas Dow won the presidency of
the junior engineers, with Milton
Goetz, vice-president; Edward Brad-
ley, secretary; George McCordie,
treasurer, and Daniel Kearney, . foot-
ball manager.
Hillery Heads Sophs
Returns from the sophomore lit
election held yesterday afternoon
show Vernon Hillery to have secured
the presidency by a slight majority.
Other officers of the class are: Helene
Torrey, vice-president; Merry Wag-
ner, secretary; Robert Gibson, treas-
urer; R. E. Adams, football manager.
'Officers of the sophomore engineers
elected yesterday afternoon are: Ed-
ward Johns, president; R. Hand, vice-
president; Edward Haugh, secre-
tary; Thomas Lynch, treasurer; Ray-
mond Olds, football manager.
Among the four class elections to
be held today is that of the senior
engineers, to be conducted from 9-to
12 o'clock, in the corridor over the
engineering arch.
The list of the nominees is: Pres-
ident, Clarence Johnson, Carl Wet-
zel; vice-president, Roswell Dillon,
Murray Van Wagner; secretary, Law-
rence Frost, W. R. Harrison; treas-
urer, James Barger, Mark B. Covell;
football manger, Paul Carrick, A. R.
Reynolds.
Fresh Engineers to Elect
The election of the Fresh engi-
neers is from 2 to 5 o'clock in the
same place. The nominees are: Pres-
ident, John Bernard, Raymond Kritz;
vice-president, Frank Pollen, John
Sutter; secretary, Henry Slaughter,
Chester Swigert; treasurer, Robert
Mitchell, Russel Paris; football man-
ager, Harry Reed, Cameron Ross .
Junior lit elections come from 9 to
12 o'clock in University hall. Nom-
inees are as follows: President,
Maurice Atkinson, O. W. Rush; vice-
president, Margaret Stone, Hazel
Storz; secretary, Brewster Campbell,
Zella Carr; treasurer, Edward Priehs,
F. M. Smith.v
Freshman lits will have their elec-
tion from 2 to 5 o'clbck in University
hall. The nominees are: President,
Harry Kipke, Donald Steketee; vice-
president, Edith Barker, Mary
Hayes; secretary, Mary Hause, Dor-
othy Rockwell; treasure, Robert
Wilkins, W. Baker. (

Dow to Head Junior Engi-
Hillery Wins First Honors
in Soph Lit Class

First Gargoyle
Comes Out Today
Michigan's humor magazine, the
Gargoyle, will be offered for sale on
the campus today for the first time
this year. While obeying what seems
to be an old custom, that of dedicat-
ing its first number to the freshmen,
the Gargoyle offers the work of the
best cartoonist on the campus.
Waldo Gower, '23, who has recent-
ly published a book of cartoons deal-
ing with life on the campus, has a
double page cartoon in this number.
Lee Boyd, '22, is the cover artist, the
work being done in three colors. Carl
Hubach, '22, has a full page cartoon,
and the issue contains the usual num-
ber of smaller drawings, as well as a
wealth of other humorous material.
RESERVED SEATS FOR
CHICA9GAME SOLO
MONEY ORDERS FOR TICKETS
RETURNED TO MANY
APPLICANTS
No more tickets for reserved seats
either in the north or in the south
stands for the Michigan-Chicago
game are available, according to Har-
ry Tillotson, assistant athletic direc-
tor. After 6 o'clock last night no ap-
plications were received, and many
students who delayed filing their
blanks in due time were disappointed.
Several thousand dollars' worth of
money orders for reservations were
returned to applicants, and a state-
ment of explanation for this action
has been issued by the Athletic as-
sociation. The statement follows:
"We regret that we are cailed up-
on to return remittances as our en-
tire seating capacity of 23,000 seats
has been sold. We have a limited
number of general admission tickets
at $1.50 which may be purchased at
the gate on the day of the game,
which will entitle purchasers to"
etanding room. Student coupon num-
ber 5 will be accepted at the gates
for standing room."
PRESIDENT OPENS 67TH
TEACHERS'__ CONVENTION
MICHIGAN PROFESSORS ARE ON
PROGRAM OF MEET.
ING
Taking for his theme the address,
"Being Alive," delivered before the
graduating class of the University at
Commencelast last spring, President
Marion L. Burton opened the 67th an-
nual convention of the Michigan State
Teachers' association yesterday aft-
ernoon at Grand Rapids.
Following the address given before
the teachers, the President discussed
"The Aim of American Education" at
a sectional meeting in the Grand
Rapids armory.
A number of the University faculty
are in attendance at the convention
and are scheduled to speak at the
meetings - today.
Registrar Arthur G. Hall will dis-
cuss the question of whether high
school graduates are as successful in
colleeg work as in business life, and
he will be followed by talks by Prof.
Guy M. Whipple, Cleo Murtland, as-
sociate' professor of Industrial edu-

cation, Prof. C. O. Davis, and Prof.
A. S. Whitney.
This afternoon Prof. George E.
Myers will discuss the James law,
and talks will also be given by Prof.
Charles P. Wagner and Prof. J. B.
Edmonson.

WHO IS YOUR CHOICE
FOR U. S. PRESIDENT
Students are urged to ex-
press their preference for the
presidency of the United States
for the ensuing years.
On the dotted lines below,
place your choice for President{
-Harding, Cox, Debs, or any of!
the candidates, then your class,
and whether you are a man or
woman. Mention if you are a
faculty member.
Mail this slip or take it to the
office of The Michigan Daily in
the Press building by noon
Friday. Place it in an envel-
ope for the Sunday editor.
Thebresult of the straw ballot
will be published Sunday, in
connection with the political fea -
tures in the Sunday Supple-i
ment.
My Choice for President
Male....................
Female... .......... ...
Faculty .....................
Class ..... . .........
Arias,lDuets,
Quartettes Wi ll
Feature Concert
Arais, duets, and quartettes will
feature the program which will be
presented by the Metropolitan Opera
sextette in Hill auditorium at 8
o'clock tonight. This concert will
open the 42nd season of the Univer-
sity Choral Union series.
The program will be divided into
two parts: the first of which will be
given over to the rendition of selec-
tions written by the renowned Ital-
ian composer, Giacomo Puccini, while
the second part will be made up of
numbers composed by his fellow
countryman, Giuseppe Verdi. This
program will be the same in every
respect as the famous concert pro-
grams given at the Metropolitan
Opera house. A significant fact re-
garding the individual numbers is
that each artist will appear in the
numbers that have won him or her
the greatest success on the operatic
stage.
The sextette includes some of the
most renowned artists on the Metro-
poditan roster. The personnel is as
follows: Giovanni Martinelli, who
ranks next to Caruso among the ten-
ors at the Metropolitan; Giuseppe Co-
rallo, who has made an enviable rep-
utation for himself in tenor roles;
Marie Rappold, a prima donna sopra-
no; Nina Morgana, a young soprano
who has earned many laurels since
her discovery by Caruso; Helen
Marsh, who has sung many leading
contralto roles, and Thomas Chal-
mers, noted as the finest baritone at
the Metropolitan. They will be ac-
companied by EmilioRoxas at the
piano.
Marine Minister Elected Greek Regent
London, Oct. 28.-The Greek chamb-
er of deputies has selected Admiral P.
Coundouriotis as regent of Greece by
a vote of-137 to 3, says a dispatch to
the London Times from Athens. Ad-
miral Coundouriotis is minister of
marine in the Venizelos cabinet.

LEARN

SERVICE TO MICHIGAN, SLOGAN Of
THIRD TRADITIONS DAY CELEBRA HTION,
FOUR THOUSAN'D STUDENTS ATTE!

TO BE OF VALUE
UXIVERSITY, SAYS
WATKINS

JOHNSON'S APPEARANC
SIGNAL FOR CHEERIN(
Professor Aigler Urges Closer Rela
tionship of Men and Faculty
in His Address
Service to Michigan was the ke:
note of the third annual celebratic
of Traditions day - the day whe
Michigan freshmen and Michiga
men are inculcated with Michiga
spirit.
Four thousand students of the Un
versity, last night in Hill auditorium
made the third annual Traditions da
a reality. They heard what Michiga
means to her faculty, her altmni, at
to her student body. And from th
cheering and singing, they know no
what it means- to the new Michiga
men - the class of '24.
Watkins Speaks
"There is a place for you in th
University; there is something tha
each of you can do to help the Un
versity," James Watkins, '09, speal
er for the alumni, told the 4,000 sti
dents who had gathered in the and
torium. "Keep your eeys open an
learn to be of service to Michigan."
Watkins declared that there we:
two types of traditions - the typ
that is evinced outwardly and th
type that is composed of ideals. I
the first he included the wearing c
freshman pots, showing courtesy .
upperclassmen, and the like. In th
latter, he put the Michigan ideals c
sportsmanship, spirit, and schola
ship.
Watkins, following his introductit
by Carl E. Johnson, '20, was enthus
astically cheered. Johnson, who act
ed as chairman of the meeting,
Michigan's famous track star, fo
mer president of the Student cour
cil, and Olympic athlete. Johnsor
appearance on the platform as char
man was the signal for an outbur
of cheering, spontaneous at first, an
finally developing into an oragnize
effort, led by A. O. Cuthebrt, '21E,
an effort to show Michigan's appr
ciation of one of her greatest men.
Aigler Talks for Faculty.
Prof. Ralph W. -Aigler, the fix
speaker on the program of the eve
ing, was the representative of tb
faculty. His address urged a clos
relationship between student and fa
ulty.
"Meet the faculty man half wa
and he'll be mighty glad to come tb
rest of the way," Aigler declare
"The only reason that we can't knc
you all is because there-are too man
of you."
James McClintock, 121L, speaker!f
(Continued on page Eight)

I.-

LAST CHANCE TO VOTE
WITH ABSENT BALLOT
All those who have not sent
in application for ballots should
do so at once. Necessary forms
may be. obtained at the Repub-
lican club headquarters, Nick-
els' Arcade. All ballots should
be mailed to proper officers not
later than Saturday. Election
will be held in all states, Nov. 2.
Free notary service, Farmers
and Mechanics bank, 9 to 10
o'clock and at Republican club,
4 to 5:15 o'clock.

ELECTIONS TODAY.

Senior engineer election will
be held from 9 to 12 o'clock this
morning in the corridor over
the engineering arch. Freshman
engineers will elect their officers
from 2 to 5 o'clock this after-
noon in the same place.
Junior lit election will be held
from 9 to 12 o'clock today in
University hall. Fresh lits will
have their election from 2 to 5
o'clock in the same place.

r i . rr r .

Friday
Oct. 29
8 P. M.

Six

Brilliant

Opera Stars

FIVE BIG
CONCERTS

GIOVANNI MARTINELLI TENOR MARIE RAPPOLD, SOPRANO
NINA MORGANA, SOPRAv0 GIUSEPPE CORALLO, TENOR
HELENA MARSH, CONTRALTO THOMAS CHALMERS, BASS
EMILIO ROXAS, AT THE PIANO
IN A PROGRAM OF VERDI - PUCCINI .MUSIC AS GIVEN AT THE FAMOUS SUNDAY EVENING
CONCERTS AT THE METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE
COURSE TICKETS (with $3.00 Festival Coupon) $4.50 - $5.00 - $5.50 - $6.00. INDIVIDUAL CON-
CERTS $1.00 - $1.50- $2.00 FOR SALE AT THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC - MAYNARD STREET

LATER
America's

ANN ARBOR'S
GREATEST CONCERT

Greatest Stars.

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